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Publication numberUS2666644 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1954
Filing dateFeb 15, 1951
Priority dateFeb 15, 1951
Publication numberUS 2666644 A, US 2666644A, US-A-2666644, US2666644 A, US2666644A
InventorsWalter A Heiby, Richard A Strehlow
Original AssigneeWalter A Heiby, Richard A Strehlow
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board apparatus
US 2666644 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l5 Sheets-Sheet l Jan- 19, 1954 R. A. sTREHLow ETAL GAME BOARD APPARATUS Filed Feb. 15, 1951 F|G.l

Jan. 19, 1954 Filed Feb. 15. 1951 rms cem-mons R. A. sTREHLow ET Ai. 2,666,644

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PAR VALUE All VALUE PAK VALUE $|zooo :s ooo $2oooo L J L .1 L I FIGB | m 'l l: :l L3 r' m I3 EXTRA mwoeno amm olvlosno :xm uvnosno New Yoan cem-RAL cousus msnm' zemrn nAono zooo $5000 4ooo Pen |oo smoes Pea loo sumas en loosmmes r m -1 n m -1l r tb J3 3 Y J3 EXTRA mvloeno sxrnn mvlosnn exTnA owloeno osuenALuoTons Dupon-r m.1's|..a TEL.

sooo sooo vooo Pen loo sumas Pen loo sumas en loo sHAnEs f@ f@ fo U U U J |NvENTORs=. RICHARD A STREHLOW WALTER A. HEIBY Recewe #Iooo FRoMBRoKaR Jan. 19, 1954 Filed Feb. l5, 1951 News TICKER '"4 You ruwe eARNeo AN ARBITRAGE PROFIT R. A. STREHLOW ETAL GAME BOARD APPARATUS NEWS TICKER A SUCCESSFUL PUT OPTION" HAS RESULTED IN A PRoFIT CoI.I.ecT$Iooo moon a 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 News TICKER `-'4 MOVE TO NEXT A.T. T. IF YOU PASS INCOME TAX UARE, PAY YOUR TAX y News TICKER '14 YOUR BROKER NEEDS `\YOUR ATTEMPTEO NEWS TICKER I4 News TICKER YOUR LOSS ON A FALSE None MARGIN mv $Ioooo PYRAMIDING OPERATION HAS FAILED PAY ssooo To sRoKeR nove wAs SMALL Due To Youn sToP Loss mv Saooo To aRoKeR PARvALuI-:In DIVIDEND PER CHAIPMAN'S CORNER.

SECURT remco sums Ioo sumas SALAILV PeNALTv FIC-3.7 NEWYUKKCENTRAI. 4.000 $2.000 S 8.000 $Ie.ooo DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT 6.000 3 .00o l2 .obo 4.000 zeNITN IzAoIo 5,090 4.ooo Is.ooo 32.000 B GENERAL MoToIzs I2,ooo 5.ooo 24.00 4a.ooo F Du vom' Ie.aoo s-ooo 32ooo 64.000 AM. TEL. ErTEL. 7.000 40.0()0 80000 l l j FIC-:.9 @Ffm INveNToRs: l RICHARD A. STREHLOW WALTER A. HEIBY MA/JJM ATT'YS Patented Jan. 19,1954

GAME BOARD APPARATUS Richard A. Strehlow, Champaign, and: Walter A. Heiby, Chicago,.l1l.

Application February 15, 1951, 'Serial-.Nm 211,082

Claims;

This invention relatesto` a parlor game board apparatus and particularly togarne boardsY which provide a predetermined path along which each player moves his playing piece during the course of the game, the path being divided into a plu'- rality of spaces or segments each determining a kind or condition of play, and in which the extent of each players move is designated by chance.

Games of this kind are old and well known and several, such as Landlords Game, disclosed in U. S. Patent No. 1,509,312, issued September `23, 1924, and Monopoly/ disclosed in U. S. Patent No. 2,026,032, issued December 31, 1935, have the added feature of requiring a certain degree of individual skill during the course of the game to determine which. of the players will be the winner of the game.

The present invention is, inparticular, lan improvement over the games specifically above mentioned and the main objects of the invention are to provide an improved game oftrading in property in which the actions of bartering, exchanging and bargaining are involved; to provide such a game in which the play automatically and continuously causes a reasonable and logical iuctuation in the value of the property traded or held by each of the several players; to provide such a game in which, for each play, the player is required to make a choiceof one or more of several alternative chance de;- terrnined moves, and thereby employ his personal skill to attain the objective of winning the game; to provide an improved game board apparatus in which successive groups of segments, of av multiple-segmented playing path, are designated to represent different kinds of properties and: in which each groupuof segments intermixes, to a certain extent, with the next succeeding group in such a manner as to oiier a choice of alter,- nativey moves to each player; to provide such a game board apparatus in which the several y.seg-

ments of each group, or kind of property, are further designated to represent different conditions of trade; and to provide van improved game apparatus wherein the play involves the trading of property, such assecurities-or corn-kv modities, in a manner closelyy resembling the usual marketr practices and in such a manner that the game is highly educational as Well as entertaining.

A Yspeciii'c embodiment of this invention is shown in the accompanying drawings in which:` Figure 1 is a plan view ofA a game board or playing eld arranged according to our' invention and showing the various elements of the board .involvedr in the play of a typical'y game.-

2 The drawing is lined for color as when viewed from the bottom of the-sheet.

Fig. 2 is a view showing six diiierent playing cardseach representing. a specific property having a predetermined value, there beingA a plurality of like cards for each property in a set of property cards.

Fig; 3 is a view showing a set of cards each representing a special return or extra dividend accruing to the holder of one or more correspondingproperty cards, there being one special return orextra dividendi card for each kind of propertycards.

Fig. 4` is a view representing typical ones of a setof chance cards, each representing a particular'gain or lossv to the playerk who obtains onev of the cards during the'course of the game.

Fig. 5 is a view showing a set of markers or playing ypieces bywhich Teach ofthe vseveral players-` marks his position on the board or playing eld.

Fig. 6 isa view showing the play money or scrip used in the game, the money being in several denominations.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged' view of an instruction panel provided onV each side ofthe gaine board playing eld and showing'` the fixed values for various transactions arising in the play of the game. l Y

Fig. 8 is an enlarged view showing the details of a special one of the segments or divisions ofthe playing path, and

Fig. 9 isa perspective view of the dice used to determine. the extent of move a player may make along the playing path.

In the form shown in the drawings, the improved gameboard I is ofA flat rectangular form and is provided adjacent its margin with a circumferential playing path Zwhich is closed upon itself and which is divided into a plurality of segments or spaces 3. A brancher alternative pathdA is also provided on the board, which alternative path.leads.-,from one of the segments ofthe main path, and after traveling a predetermined course returns to another segment of the main path. This alternative path is also divided into a plurality of, segments `5 as will be hereafter described.

Each of the segments of the main path is provided with a particular indicia or designation representing either a property to be traded, a condition of play, a special award, a penalty, or a chance, and certainA of the segments may represent a combination of these features. Certain onesA ofthe segments or spaces are designated' or characterized'- as being members of a specific group and the total number of spaces is such that a plurality of such specic groups may be provided throughout the course of the path.

In the form shown, six speciiic groups of spaces are provided and the spaces contained in each group are characterized or designated to represent a particular kind l01 item of trade; for eX- ample, the shares of stock of a particular corporation. The number oi spaces contained in each of the groups is equal and the spaces constituting any one of the groups refer individually and collectively to the kind of item of trade, or shares of stock, as distinguished from a specic quantity of the item of trade or stock shares. For example, the spaces of one group may represent New York Central stock shares, another group may represent Douglas Aircraft stock shares, another group may represent Zenith Radiofstock shares, etc.; each group representing stock shares of a different corporation. Also, the individual spaces constituting any one of the specific groups of spaces may be further designated to additionally represent various conditions of trade, such for example as market open or market closed, this feature serving to properly and equitably distribute the traded items among the players, and to heighten interest in the game as will hereafter appear from the description of the play.

Each of the speciiic groups of spaces is arranged on the game path in a predetermined manner, such that the endwise spaces comprising each group will, to a limited extent, be intermixed with the spaces of the next succeeding' group, preferably in such a manner that less than one-half of the total number of spaces of any one group will be wholly within the end limits of any adjoining group. Thus there is maintained a denite progression of the groups along the game path, such that each group, from end to end, occupies a region of the game path in which it is the predominant group.

An example of such a progressive group arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 in which it will be seen that the Dupont group of segments begins just left of center at the bottom side of the rectangular game path and progresses clockwise. The New York Central groupl of segments extends into, or intermixes with, the rst part of the Dupont group and thelatter extends into, or intermixes with the next successive group which is designated A T. & T.. Thus assuming a starting point with the first Dupont segment and progressing clockwise along the game path, and disregarding the random inserted penalty segments, the sequence of group segments is as follows: Dupont, Dupont New York Central, New York Central, Dupont, Dupont, Dupont, .A. T. Sz T2, Dupont, A. T. & T., Dupont It will be seen that there are a total of seven Dupont segments in the Dupont group and that two segments of the New York Central group extend into, or intermix with, the Dupont group while two segments of the latter group extend into the next successive or A. T. & T. group. Also it will be seen that of all the commodity segments between the rst and last segments of the Dupont group, the Dupont segments are the most numerous and the Dupont group is` the predominant one in that region of the game path over which it extends.

As shown and in order to more, readily desig# nate and distinguish the spaces belonging to any specific group, each specic group of spaces is further identified by means or" a particular color. Thus the spaces or segments belonging to one particular group for example, New York Central, may be colored red, the spaces or" another group for example, Dupont may be colored blue, and the spaces of another group for example, A. T. & T. may be colored green, and so forth throughout the entire extent of the playing path. In this manner the spaces of each speciiic group can be readily identified during the course of play and the extent of intermingling of the respective groups with each other can be easily determined. As shown, the coloring for the different spaces or segments belonging to each group representing a specific traded item is applied at the end of each segment that is nearest the edge of the board, rather than over the entire space or segment, in order not to detract from the legibility of the printed matter applied to the space or segment to designate its kind or the related condition of trade.

As shown, there are provided certain other, uncolored, spaces or segments which are distributed more or less at random throughout the course of the playing path, and among the spaces or segments which belong to the specific groups of spaces. These other uncolored spaces or segments are unrelated to the several specic groups of segments and are marked to represent awards, penalties and chance plays. For example, certain of the uncclored spaces are marked extra dividend to indicate that, when any player lands on one of them, all players who hold certificates representing the item of trade designated by'one of the extra dividend cards (Fig. 3) are to receive an award of a predetermined amount. The penalty spaces are to indicate that a player landing on one of them is to be penalized in a predetermined manner and the news ticker spaces are to indicate that a player landing on one of them must take a chance play as will be hereafter described. It will be understood that additional uncolored spaces may be provided to show other types of directives designed to add to and further the players interest in the game.

As shown in Fig. l, one of the corner segments of the main playing path is designated as an income tax segment or space. This segment is indicated at A in the drawings and is shown in detail in Fig. 8, and as shown, this segment contains designations of a predetermined amount of tax which is to be paid according to the amount of any particular traded item the respective players may be holding.

As shown in Fig. 1, the alternative path may be a penalty path which begins and ends at predetermined spaces or segments of the main path, and the segments of the alternative path d may be provided with various specio penalties which a player landing upon them must pay. Thus, a player landing on the penalty segment 6, designated panic must travel over the alternative path before he can continue play along the main path. The several segments of the alternative path 4 may be marked to indicate penalties of predetermined amount and there may be several segments in the alternative path which represent like penalty amounts. Also, in order t0 more clearly designate the segments having diierent penalty amounts, the segments of the alternative path may be given speoic color indicia, each color representing a predetermined sum. Preferably this color indicia is applied in a marginal strip or border 'l which extends along the outer a'eecgecc 'margin of the alternative path. .In this manner the player, who in the ordinary course of the gameY usually` has a` choice 'of thel number vof spacesithat he may move in each play, may make hischoice according to the color of the space on which heV may land and thereby more/easily choose the space having the lowest penalty amount.

Asshown in Fig. 1 a marked starting box or area 8 is provided at each inside corner of the main playingV path, which starting boxes or spaces are numbered to indicatethe-star-ting position of each of the'respective players. Also, aninstruction box, indicated by the letter B, is provided on each of the four sidesof the board and adjacent to the inner margin of theplaying path. This instruction box B which is shown in detail in Fig. 7, provides a complete list of traded items together with the predetermined values for each of the traded items. For instance, as shown in Fig. 7, six securitiesare listed, a predetermined par value is given for each security, the value of the dividend that may accrue to each security is listed, and the value of the Chairmans salary and the corner penalty for each security is listed. Thus each ofthe players, who will normally be seated around the playing board, will have before him for ready reference, al coinplete list of the traded items and the various monetary values applying to each to-serve as a guide for his choice of play. The game board is also provided-with a box or square on which the news ticker cards may be placed, and another box l0 onvwhichthe extra dividend cards may be placed.

In addition to the playing board before described, the game apparatus comprises a number of markers or tokens by which the several players register their respective movements and positions on the playing path, for example, eight checkerlike devices i l, as shown in Fig. 5, each of which bears an identifying, number; a plurality of cards I2 representing stock certificates, such as shown in Fig. 2, ofy which there should be at least four for each stock represented to make a total of at least twenty-four certicates; a plurality of extra dividend cards 13 to total at least one for each kind of stock represented as yshown in Fig. 3; a plurality of news ticker cards I4, such as. shown in Fig. 4 of the drawings, and of sufli.-

4cient number, for example thirty, to provide a wide range of chance plays; play money l5 in at leastv four denominations, for example, $1,000.00, $5,000.00, $10,000.00 and $20,000.00 such as shown in Fig. 6, to total approximately $1,000,000-00; and one pair of dice i6, as shown in Fig. 9.

The stock certilicate cards l2 may be of any convenient size and of any appropriate printed form. Preferably each certificate will represent one hundred shares of a designated stock and will indicate the par value of the hundred share certificate.

The extra dividend cards I3 may be any convenient size and appropriate format, and each extra dividend card will bear a designationof the total value of the extra dividend accruing forl The news ticker cards 14, which are one of vthenieans for introducing the chance element Preferably each .,news ticker card will have the designation newsticker printed in large letters on one side of the cards and each card will have a predetermined directive printed thereon on one face only, and designating a particular reward, penalty, or game play by 'which the player may stand to gain or lose monetary values. Preferably the directive printed on each of the news ticker cards will use ordinary market terminology as an educative feature and the various rewards or penalties or other game actions described by the news ticker cards will correspond to actual events or happenings occurring in the course of ordinary stock market operations.

Preferably each news ticker card will contain ay directive that is different than the directive contained on the other news ticker cards, and these directives may be arbitrarily chosen so long as they relate to events or operations as they loccur in the actual markets where the commodities, securities, or other properties for which the game may be designed, are traded. For example, in addition to 'the sixy specimens illustrated in Fig. 4, the news ticker cards may provide for the following events:

You have made use of your option on a convertible bond.v Collect $1,000.00 from broker.

For attempting a washed sale you have been fined'. Pay $7,000.00 to broker.

You have sold your blue chip holdings at a loss. Pay $10,000.00 to broker.

By selling short in a rising market you have lost. Pay broker $4,000.00.

State personal property $4,000.00 to broker.

The market is dropping rapidly. Your protective stops have been caught. Go to panic.

One of your industrial holdings has been declared bankrupt. Receive your equity of $1,000.00 from broker.

Due to a mistake in your income tax you have been sent to Leavenworth penitentiary. If you pass income tax square pay tax and $10,000.00 line and lose one turn.

Immco preferred (callable at l0) has been called. Receive $1,000.00 from broker.

For ignoring triangle formation, pay broker $3,000.00

Unsuccessful call option, purchases have re sulted in a loss. Pay broker $1,000.00.

Move to next Zenith. 1f you pass income tax Square pay your tax.

It will be apparent that many other similar directives may be employed and iorder 'to provide a wide range of the Ychance possibilities, it is preferable that thirty or more news ticker cards be provided.

tax due. Pay

At the start of the play of the game one of the vplayers is selected to act also as the broker, and play money is distributed to each of the players in the following quantities:

Five $1,000.00 certificates; Three $5,000.00 certificates; and Six $10,000.00 certificates.

The extra dividend cards are then preferably arranged in a. stackV in increasing numerical order, and the stack is placed, preferably face up, on the extra dividend square on the playing board; and the news ticker cards are shufed and the stack is placed, face downwardly, on the news ticker square 9 on the playing board. Each player holding his own marker then takes a turn at throwing the dice. The player with the highest sum from his shake of the dice places his marker in position number 1, and the succeeding players place their markers on positions 2, 3, 4, and so forth, in accordance with their sequence as determined by the sum which they respectively get from their roll of the dice. ln case or tie for position, the players who are tied determine their position by further rolls of the dice.

The play begins by the player at No. 1 position throwing the dice and selecting one of the two numbers which appear as his move, and he then moves his marker that number of spaces. For example, if the player shakes 3 and 6 on the dice, he may move either three or six spaces along the playing path from his starting position. The player must select one of the two numbers that appear on the dice, and may not use the sum of the numbers. Successive players proceed similarly.

The method of play is as follows:

1. A player landing on a security square is privileged to buy one hundred shares of that security from the broker if the square is marked market open. lThe player buys the security at par value and may buy only if there are shares of that security in the brokers cnice.

2. A player landing on any security square representing a security which he owns receives from the broker the dividend stated in the instruction box B for each 100 shares that he may own.

3. If a player lands on a security square, which security he does not own, he must pay the salary or corner penalty amount indicated in the instruction box B to any player owning 300 or 400 shares of that security' A player owning 300 shares of a particular security is designated as the Chairman of the Board and is entitled to receive the Chairmans salary from any other player who lands on one of the segments of that security group. A player owning 400 shares of a particular security is considered to have cornered the market, and any other player landing on a square or segment for that particular security, is considered to have sold short to the holder of the corner and must cover his commitments by paying the corner penalty amount stated in the instruction box to the holder of the corner.

4:. A player landing on an extra dividend square, causes the extra dividend stated on the uppermost card of the extra dividend pile to be paid to anyone owning the security indicated by that card. That extra dividend card is then moved to the bottom of the pile. By arranging the extra dividend cards in predetermined sequence, preferably of ascending par value, and face up, the players are able to determine the security on which the next extra dividend will be paid, and may govern their choice of moves along the playing path accordingly.

5. A player landing on a news ticker segment of the playing path removes the top card from the pile of news ticker cards and follows the instructions printed thereon. This card is then placed face down at the bottom of the stack of news ticker cards.

6. A player landing on the square marked panic must travel over the alternate path, and while in the alternate path, he must pay the amounts stated on the particular segments on which he lands. The colors of the alternate path segments indicate the amounts to be paid. For example, red $12,000.00; orange $6,000.00; green $2,000.00.

7. A player landing on the square marked Leavenworth must pay a $10,000.00 line and lose his next turn.

8. A player landing on a go to panic segment must move his piece to the panic segment, paying income tax if he passes the income tax segment, and then proceed along the alternate or panic path.

9. A player landing on the segment marked go to Leavenworth must pay his income tax, a $10,000.00 ne and lose his next turn.

10. A player landing on a segment marked go to iirst extra dividend square must move to that position and pay income tax in accordance with the schedule in the income tax segment A. An extra dividend is then paid in accordance with Rule 4.

l1. A player landing on or passing the income tax square must pay a tax on each kind of security that he may hold in accordance with the following schedule:

For each shares of a kind-s 5,000.00 For each 200 shares of a kind-$10,000.00 For each 300 shares of a kind-$25,000.00 For each 400 shares of a kind- $50,000.00

A player may not reduce his tax by sale of his securities after his turn with the dice which forces him to land on or pass the income tax segment.

12. 1f doubles are thrown with the dice, the player must pay to the broker accumulated commissions of $5,000.00.

13. A player may at any time sell his securities to the broker at one-half par value, abiding by Rule l1 when applicable.

14. A player may oier to buy or sell any securi- 1 ties after his turn and before he releases the dice to the next player by asking for quotations from any or all of the other players. He may do this regardless of the space on which he has landed even if the space indicates market closed.

(Market closed merely indicates that there can be no purchases from the broker.) player is bound by players rules.)

15. A player may offer to buy securities from any other player at the close of his turn.

16. Once bidding has begun, any of the other players may also bid on the particular item offered or sought even though the ultimate transaction does not involve the player who has just completed his turn.

17. Transactions may be made which involve transfer of stock shares, as well as cash, for other stock shares.

The game continues according to the above rules until only two persons remain in the game due to bankruptcy of the other players, unless at the option of the majority of the players, the game may be concluded after fewer players have declared bankruptcy. When the number of players remaining in the game has been reduced to (Broker as two, or any other agreed number, the game is terminated when the last of the remaining players, in the order of play, has paid his income tax by landing upon or passing the income tax segment. At the close of the game, the securities held by the closing players are calculated at par value and the cash held by the respective players 'is added to the value'of their securities. VThe per- 'in the arrangement of the game board whereby ordinary play of the game resultsin fluctuating lvalues of the properties traded, and in the 'fact that each kind of security has a difierentvalu'e so that each player starts the gaine with a'different competitive position, depending upon'his particular starting point. Other advantages are to be found in the endwise intermixed Vrelation of the specic groups of segments whereby, while all of the segments of one group are contained in one particular portion of the playing path, the several segments of that group Yare suiiciently spaced and intermingled with the segments of the next succeeding group as to provide an opportunityfor the player to exercise his judgment in the choice of plays that may be made; and inthe Vuse of two chancedevices jfor determining ythe play to'be made, such as a pair of dice or two spinners, ywhereby the player is compelled. to make lan election yor choice each time it lis :his turn to play.

Still further advantages are to be found inthe use of multiple starting points, each of which affords the 'espective player a vdifferent valueffor the securities he may initially acquire, andin the arrangement in the playing iield ofthe incometax segment and the alternate or panic path whereby accumulations of capital and securities by each of the several players may be siphoned off and returned to the broker for continuance of play of the game. Still` other advantages are to be found in the use of the extra dividend cards by which the value of various securities may be enhanced, and in the dispersal along the playing path of the positions at which stock purchases from the broker may be made, thereby affording the several players ample opportunity to increase their holdings and to utilize their judgment as to which of the traded' items it might be mostY advantageous for themY to acquire.

Although but one specific embodiment of this invention is herein shown and described, it will be understood that variations of the apparatus and the game board shown may be made without ydeparting from the spirit oi this invention as dened by the following claims:

We claim:

l. A game board apparatus comprising va board having a playing path thereon divided into a plurality of segments, certain of said segments s being designated to constitute a distinguishable group of'segments and there being a plurality of such groups in said path each diering from the other by individual distinguishing characteristics, said groups being arranged in succession along the course of said playing path and in such a manner that the segments adjacent one end oi each group intermixed-With those of the adjacent end of the next succeeding groupand each group being so arranged that, from' end to end, its segments numerically predominate the intermixed segments of the adjoining groups, a set of individually distinctive playing pieces for registering movement and positionY o each player along said path, and means for determining by chance the extent of at least ltwo alternative playing moves on said board for each player.

2. A game board apparatus comprising a board having a playing path thereon divided into a plurality of segments, certain of said segments being designated to constitute a distinguishable group of segments and there being a plurality of such groups in said path, each group differing from the other groups by individual distinguishing characteristics, said. groups being arranged in succession along the course of said playing path and 'in such a manner that the segments adjacent one end of each group intermix with those ofthe adjacentend of the next succeeding group, yand each group being so arranged that from end to end its segments numerically predominate the intermixing segments of the adjoining groups, a plurality of other segments distributed at random along said playing path and among theY segments constituting said distinguishable groups, said other segments having designations indicative of diiferent playing actions than-said'groups of segments, and an alternative path onsai'd board beginning at one of said other segments` and ending at another thereof, `said alternative pa-tli'being` divided into a plurality of segments each of which is identied as belonging to one of a plurality of differently characterized groups o1y said'segments, a set of individually distinctive playing pieces for registering movement and position of each player along said paths, and means-for determining by chance the extent of atleast two alternative playingmoves on said board for eachpiayer.

8. Aigame board apparatuscomprising aboard having a continuous playing path thereon divided into a plurality of segments, certain of said segments being designated to constitute a distinguishable group of segments and there being a plurality of such groups in said path, each group differing from the other groups by individual distinguishing characteristics, said groups being arranged in succession along the course of said playing path and in such a manner that the segments adjacent one end of each group are intermingled with those of the adjacent end of the next succeeding group, said apparatus including groups of property designating devices, each group of said devices comprising a plurality of like elements and each group ofk devices being characteristically related to a respective one of said segment groups, means for indicating predetermined monetary values for the individual property devices contained in each group of the same and to indicate increased valuations for such devices according to the number of property chance the extent of at least two alternative playing moves for each player along said path.

4. A board'gameapparatus comprising a board having a continuous playing path thereon divided into a plurality of segments, certain of said segments being designated to constitute a distinguishable group of segments and there being a plurality of such groups, each group differing from the other groups by distinguishing characteristics indicative of a kind of property, said groups being arranged in succession along the course of said playing path and in such a manner that the segments adjacent one end of each group intermingle with those of the adjacent end of the neXt succeeding group, and certain others 0I" the segments of said playing path being located at random along said playing path and among the segments constituting said distinguishable groups, said other segments having designations indicative of awards and penalties; said apparatus including groups of property designating devices, each group of said devices comprising a plurality of like elements and each group of devices being characteristically related to a respective one of said segment groups, and a pair of independent move indicating devices operable for determining simultaneously and by chance the extent of at least two alternative playing moves along said path for each player.

5. A board game apparatus comprising a board having a continuous playing path thereon divided into a plurality of segments, certain of said segments being designated to constitute a distinguishable group of segments and there being a plurality of such groups, each group dierng from the other groups by distinguishing characteristics indicative of a kind of property, said groups being arranged in succession along the course of said playing path and in such a manner that the segments adjacent one end of each group intermingle with those of the adjacent end of the next succeeding group, certain others of the segments of said playing path being 1ocated at random along said playing path and among the segments constituting said distinguishable groups, said other segments having designations indicative of awards and penalties, and an alternative path on said board beginning at one of said other segments and ending at another thereof, said alternative path being divided into a plurality of segments characterized to indicate differentpredetermined play actions; said apparatus including groups of property designating devices, each group of said devices comprising a plurality of like elements and each group of devices being characteristically related to a re spective one of said segment groups, and a pair of play indicating means operable for determining simultaneously and by chance the extent of at least two alternative playing moves on said board for each player.

RICHARD A. STREHLOW.

WALTER A. HEIBY.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,509,312 Phillips Sept. 23, 1924 1,529,908 Newcombe Mar. i7, 1925 1,574,394 Holme Feb. 23, 1925 1,616,328 Nix Feb. 1, 1927 1,642,711 Alfonso Sept. 20, 1927 1,695,144 Edwards Dec. 11, 1928 1,779,584 Brown Oct. 28, 1930 1,994,053 Sweet Mar. 12, 1935 2,026,082 Darrow Dec. 31, 1935 2,174,058 McGennis Sept. 26, 1939

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Referenced by
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US2930621 *Sep 23, 1954Mar 29, 1960Kenneth J GrossGame
US2976044 *Oct 29, 1958Mar 21, 1961Gene S CorpeningBoard game apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00072, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6F