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Publication numberUS2667875 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1954
Filing dateMar 30, 1951
Priority dateMar 30, 1951
Publication numberUS 2667875 A, US 2667875A, US-A-2667875, US2667875 A, US2667875A
InventorsWallace Frederick Joseph
Original AssigneeAmerican Cystoscope Makers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inflatable retention catheter
US 2667875 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3954 F. J. WALLACE 57,

INFLATABLE RETENTION CATHETER Filed March 50, 1951 32 32 FEQE N gs 2a INVENTOR. FREDERICK J. WALLACE .QT TORN EY.

Patented Feb. 2, 1954 INFLATABLE RETENTION CATHETER Frederick Joseph Wallace, New York, N. Y., 8.5- signor to American Cystoscope Makers, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application March 30, 1951, Serial No. 218,467

4 Claims. 1

This invention relates to catheters, and more particularly to inflatable retention catheters that are adapted to be advantageously employed in various urological procedures, such as drainage of the bladder.

A primary object of the invention is to provide a retention type catheter having simplified and improved features of construction.

Another object of the invention is to provide an inflatable retention catheter that may be readily introduced into a body cavity, maintained in the cavity for an extended period of time without accidental dislodgement, and subsequently removed, all without undue pain or discomfort to the patient.

The invention has for a further object the provision of a catheter of the character indicated that is capable of performing its intended functions in a dependable and efficient manner.

With the View of attaining the foregoing objects, a catheter constructed in accordance with this invention preferably comprises an elongated, flexible tubular member closed at its forward end and open at its rearward end. The tubular member defines a central longitudinal passage that serves as a drainage channel or lumen, and has in its forward end portion a plurality of spaced openings which establish direct communication between its interior and exterior. An inflatable bag is carried by and encircles the tubular mem ber rearward of the openings. The bag consists of a pair of thin, flexible annular members that are substantially impervious to moisture and nonelastic when stressed in tension under conditions of normal intended use. The inner marginal portion of each annular member is hermetically sealed to the tubular member and spaced from the corresponding portion of the other'annular member. Also, the outer marginal portions of the annular members are hermetically sealed together. The sealing of the annular members to the tubular member and to, each other may be accomplished in any desired manner known to the art. For example, the outer marginal portions of the annular members may be readily united to obtain an effective seal therebetween with the aid of a high frequency electric current.

The catheter is provided with means within the outer confines of the tubular member and the bag for transmitting a fluid, preferably air, into the bag, whereby to inflate the bag. This means is independent of the central longitudinal passage in the tubular member and includes a second longitudinal passage in a wall of the tubular member that extends from the rear end of that member to a point beyond the annular members.

, 2 A duct or port establishes communication between this passage and the interior of the bag. A conduit connected to the rear end of the second longitudinal passage supplies air thereto and thence to the bag.

Inflatable retention catheters have generally in the past been made of rubber. Such catheters, when employed for long-term drainage of the bladder, frequently become encrusted with deposits of urinary salts. Withdrawal of these catheters, after deposition or crystallization of urinary salts on their outer surfaces, may be extremely painful to the patient and may at times require an open operation before they can be removed. Further, urinary salts deposited within the catheter reduce the drainage channel or lumen and, as a result, prevent adequate elimination of urine.

I find that catheters constructed in accordance with this invention and made of a thermoplastic material, particularly polyvinyl resins, such as copolymers of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate,,or polyethylene, are especially Well-suited for the purposes indicated. A catheter of this invention formed from a polyvinyl resin or polyethylene may, with its inflatable bag in deflated condition, be readily inserted into a body cavity, such as the bladder, retained in desired position in the bladder for an extended period of time upon inflation of the bag, and subsequently withdrawn after the bag is again deflated, without undue pain or discomfort to the patient.

Among the principal advantages of using polyvinyls or polyethylene, in place of rubber, in inflatable retention catheters are that these thermoplastics are non-irritating and non-toxic and do not support the deposition of urinary salts thereon. Moreover, polyvinyls and polyethylene are chemically inert and resistant to acids and alkalis; possess requisite smoothness, strength, and flexibility when formed in tubes and thin sheets; and have a low absorption factor, all of which characteristics contribute to the utility of these material in inflatable retention catheters.

The enumerated objects, as well as other objects, together with the advantages attainable by the practice of this invention, will be readily understood by persons skilled in the art upon reference to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the annexed drawing, which respectively describe. and illustrate a catheter constructed in accordance with the invention.

In the drawing, wherein like reference numerals denote corresponding parts throughout the several views; I A

Figure 1 is a view in side elevation of a catheter embodying the invention, partly broken away and partly in central longitudinal section;

Figure 2 is a central longitudinal section through the forward portion of the catheter shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 corresponds to Figure 2 and shows the configuration of the. bag of the catheter While inflated;

Figure 4 is a view taken along line 44 of Figure 1; and

Figure 5 is a view in enlargement taken along line 5-5 of Figure 1.

The illustrated catheter is generally indicated by numeral I0 and comprises an elongated, flexible tubular member [2, that is made from a suitable material, preferably a molded or extruded polyvinyl resin, such as a copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate, or polyethylene, that is substantially circular in transverse cross-section, and that defines a central longitudinal passage M. The tubular. member is closed and rounded at its. forward end 56 to facilitate insertion into a body cavity and is open at its rearward end 13. Adjacent the forward end of the tubular member is a plurality of openings 2! for permitting body fluids, such as urine in the bladder, to. flow into passage Hi when the catheter is in position. The tubular member has a second longitudinal passage 22 formed in its wall. A conduit 24 connected to the rear end of the tubular member is in communication with passage 22.

Rearward of, openings 2G is an inflatable bag 25 that comprises a pair of flexible, non-elastic annular members 28. The inner marginal portion 35! of each member 28 is flange-like and is hermetically sealed to the tubular member in spaced. relation to the corresponding portion of the other annular member. The outer marginal portions 32 of the annular members are disposed in abutting relation and are joined together in a manner to obtain a hermetical seal. As in the case of the tubular member, annular members 28 are also preferably made of a polyvinyl resin or polyethylene. A duct 34. establishes communication between longitudinal passage 22 and the interior of the bag.

For the purpose of outlining the manner of using the catheter, it is first assumed that the parts are in the relative position shown in Figure. 1, and that the rear end of conduit 24 is open to the atmosphere. Bag 26 is manually collapsed and deflated and arranged so that its annular members 28 extend rearwardly along tubular member l2 from the position shown in Figur 1. Closed end It of the tubular member is then inserted in the urethra and the catheter is advanced through the urethra until the forward portion of the tubular member and all of bag 25 have been introduced into. the bladder and lie forwardly of its vesical' orifice. A sufficient amount of air may next be introduced into the bag by way of conduit 24, passage 22 and duct 34 to partially inflate the bag. The. catheter is then retracted through the urethra until the rear annular member 28 of the bag bears against the anterior and posterior lips of the vesical orifice to properly position the catheter. Additional air under pressure is supplied to the bag by Way of conduit 24, passage 22 and duct 34 until the bag is fully inflated, as shown. in Figure. 3. The free end of conduit 2 is closed by a suitable plug or the like to preventescapeof air. from. the bag and conseouent deflation of. the same.

With bag 26 located and inflated as described, the same ensures retention of the catheter in the bladder. In other words, bag 26 prevent accidental dislodgment or removal of the catheter from the bladder, and the bladder is drained by Way of openings 20 and central longitudinal passage H.

To remove the catheter from the bladder, the rear end of conduit 24. is opened. to; the atmosphere, permitting discharge of air from the bag, and resulting in collapse of the bag. The catheter is then slowly retracted and completely withdrawn from the bladder and the urethra.

Thus-it will be seen that the construction herein shown and described is well adapted to accomplish the; objects of the present invention. It Will be understood, however, that the invention may be embodied otherwise than here shown, and that in the form illustrated certain obvious changes in construction may be made. Therefore, I do not wish to be limited precisely to the construction herein shown except as may be. required by the appended claims considered with reference to the prior art. a

I claim:

1. In a catheter, an elongated tubular member defining a central longitudinal passage and having in its forward end portion at least one opening establishing communication between its interior and exterior, a non-elastic inflatable bag carried by the tubular member rearward of said opening, said tubular member and bag being formed from a thermoplastic material selected from the group consisting of polyethylene and a copolymer of vinyl resins, and means within the outer confines of the tubular member and the bag for transmitting a fluid into the bag to indate the same;

2. In a catheter, an elongated tubular member defining a central longitudinal passage and having in its forward end portion at least one opening establishing communication between its interior and exterior, an inflatable bag carried by and encircling the tubular member rearward of said opening, said bag comprising a pair of thin,

flexible, non-elastic annular members made of a material that is substantially impervious to moisture, the inner marginal portion of each annular member beinghermetically sealed to the tubular member and spaced from the corresponding portion of the other annular member, the outer marginal portions of the annular members being hermetically sealed together, and means within the outer confines of the tubular member and the bag for transmitting a fluid into the bag to inflate the same.

3. In a catheter, an elongated flexible tubular member closed at its forward end and open at its rearward end, said tubular member defining a central longitudinal passage having in its forward end portion at least one opening establishing communication between its interior and exterior, an inflatable bag carried by and encircling the tubular member rearward of said opening, said bag comprising a pair of thin, flexible, nonelastic annular members made of a material that is substantially impervious to moisture, the inner marginal portion of each annular member being hermetically sealed to the tubular member and spaced from the corresponding portion of the other annular member, the outer marginal portions of the annular members being hermetically sealed. together, and means. independent of said passage. and within the outer confines of the tubular member and the bag for transmitting a fluid into the bag to inflate. thev same.

4'. In a catheter, an elonated flexible tubular member defining a central longitudinal passage and having in its forward end at least one opening establishing direct communication between its interior and exterior, an inflatable bag carried by and encircling the tubular member rearward of said opening, said bag comprising a pair of thin, flexible, non-elastic annular members, the inner marginal portion of each annular member being hermetically sealed to the tubular member and spaced from the corresponding portion of the other annular member, the outer marginal portions of the annular members being hermetically sealed together, said tubular member and bag being formed from a thermoplastic material selected from the group consisting of a copolymer of vinyl resins and polyethylene, and

means within the outer confines of the tubular member and the bag for transmitting a fluid into the bag to inflate the same, said means being independent of said central longitudinal passage and including a longitudinal passage in a wall of the tubular member.

FREDERICK JOSEPH WALLACE.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,330,399 Winder Sept. 28, 1943 2,487,546 Harrowe Nov. 8, 1949 2,537,674 Johnson Jan. 9, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2330399 *Sep 11, 1937Sep 28, 1943American Anode IncDistensible bag catheter
US2487546 *Mar 16, 1949Nov 8, 1949Harrowe ElliottInflated toy with sound producing means
US2537674 *Dec 8, 1949Jan 9, 1951Johnson John RObstetrical device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2856932 *Dec 16, 1955Oct 21, 1958Dade Reagents IncBag and tube
US3169528 *May 24, 1963Feb 16, 1965Jr Harleston J HallCoronary sinus sucker
US3253594 *Jul 30, 1963May 31, 1966Frank E MatthewsPeritoneal cannula
US3618614 *May 6, 1969Nov 9, 1971Scient Tube Products IncNontoxic radiopaque multiwall medical-surgical tubings
US3626950 *Jun 19, 1970Dec 14, 1971Heyer Schulte CorpCatheter with augmented drainage means
US3900033 *Mar 7, 1973Aug 19, 1975Ortho Pharma CorpDilator for cervical canal
US5718685 *Apr 3, 1997Feb 17, 1998B. Braun Melsungen AgStomach probe
US5921957 *Jul 12, 1994Jul 13, 1999Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Intravascular dilation catheter
US6585689 *Sep 11, 2000Jul 1, 2003Cardeon CorporationAortic catheter and methods for inducing cardioplegic arrest and for selective aortic perfusion
US6916307 *Jun 22, 2001Jul 12, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Catheter with distally distending balloon
US20020032407 *Jun 22, 2001Mar 14, 2002Willis Allan F.Catheter with distally distending balloon
EP0697205A1 *Aug 14, 1995Feb 21, 1996Roewer, Norbert, Dr.Gastric probe
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/103.13, 604/916
International ClassificationA61F2/958
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/1002
European ClassificationA61M25/10A