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Publication numberUS2668373 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1954
Filing dateSep 6, 1952
Priority dateSep 6, 1952
Publication numberUS 2668373 A, US 2668373A, US-A-2668373, US2668373 A, US2668373A
InventorsRusso Leo V
Original AssigneeRusso Leo V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antislipping device for shoes
US 2668373 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 lFiled Sept. 6, 1952 inta.' 4A;

Z2-verdon Feb. 9, 1954 v RUSSO ANTISLIPPING DEVICE FOR SHOES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 6, 1952 ,5310626 Zeo a 650.

Patented Feb. 9, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in antislipping devices for attachment to shoes, particul-arly, to a device capable of easy yet secure attachment to and over the heels and soles of shoes whereby the equipped shoes may be advantageously worn for and when the wearer is sports participating, as when playing golf.

It is an object of the invention to provide a shoe heel and sole attachable anti-slipping de vice which may be attached to those types of shoes normally used for street or casual wear without alteration or modification thereof, or mutilation or damage thereto, and when desired, can be removed, thus returning the shoe or shoes to original street wear form.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a device of the stated character adjustable in shape and size, permitting its satisfactory adaptation to and use on shoes of diierent sizes (both length and width), and to an extent, form contours and shapes.

Another object of the invention is to provide the anti-slipping attachment with a novel and efficient form of calk, easily and readily connectible to and with the shoe heel and sole engagingbodies thereof and entirely capable of remaining firm and nonmovable with relation thereto, whereby to ensure a maximum of gripping engagement with fa tread surface, such, for example, as the earth, sod, etc., of a golf course.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a calk, as above, so constructed as to serve a dual function; first, as an anti-slipping means or device per se, and second, as a means for rmly and securely interconnecting the cooperable body constituting members or portions of the attachment in their particularly preadjusted relations, i. e., relationships effected according to the shapes and sizes of the heels or soles of shoes to which the anti-slipping device is attached.

A further and important object of the invention is to provide a shoe adaptable anti-slipping device of simple yet durable construction, ca-

pable of shape and size variation with but a mini-4 mum of effort, of being securely Iadapted to and over the heels and soles of shoes, and quite importantly, capable of being produced or manufactured at a comparatively low cost, rendering the same especially attractive to and advantageous for use by persons wishing to convert casual or street wear shoes into sport types of shoes.

The foregoing, as well as other objects, advantages and meritorious teachings of my invention, will be in part obvious and in part pointed out in the following detailed disclosure thereof, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, it being understood that the form of the invention presented herein is precise and what is now considered to be the best mode of embodying its principles, but that modifications and changes may be made in specific embodiments without departing from its essential features.

In the drawings:

Figure l is a perspective View of my improved anti-slipping device, the heel securing strap being shown in dotted lines.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the same.

Figure 3 is a top plan view thereof.

Figure 4 is a disassembled plan View of the primary component members of the device in blank form.

Figure 5 is a side elevation of the anti-slipping device with the heel securing strap shown in full lines and the interengaged portions of the heel and sole bodies of the devices shown in longitudinal section.

Figure 6 is a disassembled detail in perspective of the novel form of calk employed by the device, and

Figure 7 is an enlarged section taken on the line 'l-'l of Figure 3, looking in the direction in which the arrows point, illustrating the manner in which one of the calks, such as shown in Figure l6, is engaged with and mounted on the device sole body and one of the adjustable sole clamp plates, securing the latter to the former.

Referring in detail to the accompanying drawings, it is iirst noted that the anti-slipping device of my invention is produced and normally used in pairs, one for the left foot shoe and the other for a right foot shoe. In said drawings, however, I have shown the invention embodied in but one anti-slipping device (for the left foot shoe). It will be understood that the construction is the same in the companion-ate device (for the right foot shoe) The invention comprises, generally, a shoe sole engaging body I, a heel engaging body 2, and sole adjustable clamp plates 3 and 4. Each thereof are, preferably, made of metal or composition sheet-like stock of suitable iiexibility land strength..

The shoe sole engaging body l, subst-antially flat throughout itsarea, is of more or less ovate form whereby to substantially correspond to the shape of an average or normal left shoe sole. Integral with and extending longitudinally from an intermediate portion of its rearward or inner end is a flat tongue 5, of rectangular form.

The sole body l is formed with a plurality of slots or ways 6, of corresponding Widths and lengths, spaced one from the other and each in relatively different angular relationships, though generally disposed transversely of said body, as is well shown in the Figures 1 and 4 of the drawings. Another slot or Way t is formed in and disposed obliquely of *the tongue "5. Also, it is u' preferable'that the tongue 5 shall be offset slightly above the sole body l by bending or otherwise forming it, as indicated at (see Figure 5).

The heel engaging body l is o substantially elongated rectangular form, having an upstanding curved counter member or flange rprefer'- ably, though not necessarily, integral with its rearward and outer end, as is shown in Figures 1, 3, 4 and 5 oi the drawings. The Way 3, of length slightly greater than the width of the tongue 5 of the sole body l, is formed in and Atransversely of the forward and inner end por- -tion of the heel body, which said end portion is upwardly oiiset, as'by bending, at e.

- The counter ofthe heel body may and preil 'er-ably does have-slots or ways it formed therein adapted to receive an angle engaging and attaching strap I therethrough.

Immediately outwardly or rearwardly of the transverse Way 3 and intermediately thereof, an obliquely disposed Slot or Way li is formed in the heel body. Preferably, it is oi a length substantially corresponding Yto that of the way in the sole-body tongue 5 and is in opposed angular relation thereto (see Figure 4).

Other longitudinally related pairs or" slots or ways l2 and 42', o corresponding lengths, are 'formed in the heel body rearwardly oi the oblique way `Il. As Will be noted, these pairs of ways are obliquely disposed with relation to the longitudinal axis of said body and those of the pair `l2 'are in opposed angular relation to those of the pair l2'.

Ifhe sole clamp .plates 3 and .t are adapted to be Aflatly engaged 'over and with vthe normally outer or vunder side of the sole body and to be so related thereto as to permit of their .general transverse and longitudinal lplacement adjustnient thereon.

The plate -3 is of generally ovate form having its vouter side edge curved in a manner to substantially correspond to the curvature of the adjacent side vedge of the sole body. A shoe sole engagingrela'mp or jaw le is integral with this curved outer 'side of the plate in proximity to its forward end and, obviously, is for securing engagement with and over the adjacent edge portion `of a. shoe sole to which the device is attached.

VrRelatively spaced angularly disposed ways le 'are `formedin and extend, generally, longitudinally of lthe clamp plate Y3.

Thesole clamp plate i is of arcuate formation and length substantially corresponding to the sole body l, less its tongue 5. A shoe sole clamp l5, similar to the clamp E3, lis integral with the curved outer side `edge of the plate in proximity to its forward end, which said outer side edge substantially corresponds in curvature to that of the curved adjacent side edge oi the sole body.

ySpaced angularly disposed ways it are formed in and disposed, generally, longitudinally of the cla-mp plate 4.

Because of the generally longitudinal dispositioning -of said Ways lll and le in their respec- Vsaid sole body when the'clamp plates are in their assembled relationships (see Figure 3).

In order that the clamp plates 3 and 4 may be immovably secured in pre-selected positions on the sole Abody `I, bolt calks of that form such as shown in Figures 6 and 'Z of the drawings, are used. Since said callas are of the same construction, but one `thereof will be described, it

being understood that the description (to follow) will sulce for all thereof.

`The 'bolt comprises a body or shank I'l (oircular in cross-section) flatly and rather thinly headed, as at i3, and tapered and sharpened 'on its opposite and normally lower end, at I9, Whereby to function as an efficient surface engaging and anti-slipping device. The upper or medial portion or" the shank is screw-threaded, as at and adapted to have a fiat circular nut "2l turned ther-conto. -Said nut, preferably, has openings 22 in its normally outer side arranged for engagement by the usual fingers of a suitable form of spanner Wrench or like toolI not shown. For obvious piuposes, the bolt head l8 and the nut 2i are of substantially corresponding form and size, being sufficiently large to ensure firm and secure contact with objects to be engaged thereby or therebetween; also, thin though strong, to occupy a lminimum oi space. y

ln use of my improved anti-slipping device, the sole andheelbodies l and 2 are assembled by engagement of the sole body tongue Y5 iin and through the way Si of the heel body '2 in the manner well shown in the drawings. ,Thus engaged, the sole and heel bodies are secured in preselected oradjusted relationship bypassing a bolt calli, such as above described, through the registering though oppositely obliqued ways `6 and li in the adjacent sole and heel body portions; thereupon, engaging a nut 2l with and over its screw-threaded portion 28 whereby to clampingly engage with and on the adjacent-side of the heel body 2. The downwardly extended sharpened portion i9 of the bolt shank vl'l -will serve as an eiectual anti-slipping device. However, should it be desired, this particular bolt may be formed with a comparatively shorter vshank and without the sharpened and extended lower end.

rEhe opposed oblique positioning of the Ways and l i in the interengaged or overlapping portions of the sole and heel bodies is such that by moving said bodies toward or from'eaoh other, the overall length or" the device may be decreased on increased; moreover, the lateral relative positioning of the sole body with relation to the heel body, and vice versa, may be selectively varied or adi-usted, this, of course, prior to 'the tightening of the nut 2 l.

The clamp pla-tes 3 and @i are now placed flatly on the normally lower or under side of the sole body l in the manner indicated in Figure 2 of the drawings. rihus positioned, it will be noted that the generally longitudinally disposed Waysland it of .said clamp plates will be in registration vwith the ways t formed in the adjacent or overlying portions of the sole body I. Bolt calks, as above described, are now passed downwardly or outwardly through the various registering ways in the clamp plates and the sole body, with the heads of such bolts bearing on adjacent portions of the sole body. Nuts 2l are turned onto the lower and extended sharpened shank portions of the bolts and inwardly into clamping engagement with the adjacent portions of the clamp plates and the sole body, in the manner clearly shown in Figure 7 of the draw- 1ngs.

The clamp plates 3 and 4 may be selectively adjusted to predetermined portions of or on the sole body I-either longitudinally or transversely thereof due to the generally transverse dispositioning of the ways S in the sole body I and the generally longitudinal dispositioning 'of the ways I4 and I6 in the clamp plates 3 and 4. Thus, the overall width and the overall length of the sole portion of the anti-slipping device may be adjusted according to` the shape and size of a shoe sole provided therewith. Furthermore, by such longitudinal or transversal adjustment of the clamp plates 3 and 4 with relation to the sole body I, it will be readily understood and appreciated that the downwardly extended tapered or sharpened portions of the calks may be selectively positioned whereby to provide the greatest possible comfort and/or anti-slipping eiiiciency to the device when adapted to a wearers street or casual wear shoe. This latter is 0f material importance and the relative adjustment or positioning of the calks will, of course, vary according to the stance of the wearer.

Bolt calks, as hereinbefore described, are also downwardly engaged through the obliquely disposed pairs of ways I2 and I2 in the outward or rearward portion of the heel body 2. The positions or relationing of these latter bolt calks may be readily adjusted or varied with relation to said heel body by loosening their respective clamping nuts 2l and shifting or sliding the same in their individual ways I2 and/or l2-then, tightening the clamping nuts 2 I, as hereinbefore described.

To apply or adapt my improvedanti-slipping device to the normal street wear or casual shoe of a wearer or user, the sole portion of such shoe, subsequently to the hereinbeicre described adjusted assembly of the anti-slipping device, is slid longitudinally forwardly of the device so that the opposite sides of its sole are engaged over by the relatively opposed jaws I3 and I5 on the outer sides of the clamp plates 3 and 4. The heel of the shoe is now engaged in and directly adjacent the counter portion 'I of the heel body 2, whereupon the securing strap I0', engaged with the counter 1, is passed over the users ankle and fastened or secured, as by the illustrated buckle or such other separable fastening device as may be provided to the strap.

Attached as above described, the improved anti-slipping device will convert the normal street or casual wear shoe into a sport shoe quite satisfactory and eiiicient for the playing of golf or participation in various other sports requiring the use of spiked or calk shoe treads.

Because of the mode of attachment of the anti-slipping device to a shoe, it can be conveniently and quickly removed therefrom, thus returning the shoe to its normal or ordinary condition, all without damaging or injuring the same in any manner.

While I have hereinbefore disclosed the invention as being equipped with the heel counter 'I and attaching strap I0', it will be understood that other and different forms of attaching means may be substituted therefor, such as conditions or preference may dictate.

I claim:

1. In combination, a shoe tread member comprising relatively adjustable heel and sole bodies, the sole body having a plurality of generally transversely disposed ways therein, a plurality of clamp plates flatly adjacent portions of one side or" said sole body, each of said plates having a plurality of generally longitudinally disposed ways therein in a manner to and being of a number to individually intersect the ways in the sole body, said heel body having a plurality of relatively angularly disposed ways formed therein, a plurality of calks equalling the number of ways in said soie body, heel body and plates, means-cn said calks engaged through the sole body and plate intersecting ways and through the ways in said heel body mounting the calks on the heel body and on the sole body and plates and interconnecting said plates to said sole body, and means on the heel body and clamp plates for connecting the same to a shoe and over the tread portion thereof.

2. In combination, a shoe tread engaging body having a plurality of generally transversely disposed and individual ways therein, a plurality of plates atly adjacent portions of one side of said body and in transversely opposed relation, each or" said plates having a plurality of generally longitudinally disposed ways therein in a manner to and being of a number to individually intersect the ways in the sole body, shoe sole engaging and clamp jaws carried on the outer side portions of said plates overlapping adjacent side portions of the shoe sole body, a plurality of calks equalling the number of ways in said sole body and plates, and means on said calks engaged through the sole body and plate intersecting ways mounting the calks on the body and plates and interconnecting said plates to said body.

3. In combination, a shoe tread member comprising relatively laterally and longitudinally adjustably interengaged heel and sole bodies, the sole body having a plurality of generally transversely disposed ways therein, a plurality of plates flatly adjacent portions of one side of the sole body in substantially transversely opposed relation, shoe sole engaging clamp jaws on outer side portions of each of said plates overlapping adjacent side portions of the sole body, each of said plates having a plurality of generally longitudinally disposed ways therein in a manner to and being of a number to individually intersect the ways in the sole body, said heel body having a plurality of relatively spaced and angularly disposed ways therein, a plurality of calks equalling the number of ways in said heel and sole bodies, and means on said calks engaged through the intersecting ways in said sole body and plates and through the ways in said heel body mounting the calks thereon and adjustably interconnecting said sole body and plates.

LEO V. RUSSO.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025615 *Jun 28, 1960Mar 20, 1962Kenneth Patton JamesAdjustable golf sole covering
US3156988 *Sep 27, 1963Nov 17, 1964Rause Bohus BShoe lift
US3520075 *Feb 10, 1969Jul 14, 1970AramcoDetachable golf spike attachment
US5950334 *Oct 31, 1997Sep 14, 1999Gerhardt; Douglas S.Flexible spiked arrangement for placement onto footwear
US7140124 *May 27, 2005Nov 28, 2006Adidas International Marketing B.V.Full bearing 3D cushioning system
US7665232Jul 9, 2007Feb 23, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Ball and socket 3D cushioning system
US8006411Feb 9, 2010Aug 30, 2011Adidas International Marketing B.V.Ball and socket 3D cushioning system
US20110296713 *Aug 18, 2011Dec 8, 2011Battaglino Adam CBalance training footwear
WO2013025307A1 *Jul 19, 2012Feb 21, 2013Sure Foot CorporationHeel traction aid and method of manufacture therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/7.6, 36/127, 36/134
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/18
European ClassificationA43B5/18