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Publication numberUS2668885 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1954
Filing dateNov 22, 1950
Priority dateFeb 17, 1950
Publication numberUS 2668885 A, US 2668885A, US-A-2668885, US2668885 A, US2668885A
InventorsGerlat Matthew E
Original AssigneeGerlat Matthew E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fused plug and multiple tap for electrical cords
US 2668885 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 9, 1954 I E, GERLAT 2,668,885

FUSED PLUG AND MULTIPLE TAP FOR ELECTRICAL CORDS Filed Nov. 22, 1950 4 sheets-sheet 1 58 E59 flG Snventor ig MHrTHEWE 65194? W d Cttorneg Feb. 9, 1954 GERLAT 2,668,885

FUSED PLUG AND MULTIPLE TAP FOR ELECTRICAL CORDS Filed Nov. 22, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 My rh/5w E. 6 53447- M W Gttorneg Feb. 9, 1954 M. E. GERLAT 2,868,885

FUSED PLUG AND MULTIPLE TAP FOR ELECTRICAL. CORDS Filed Nov. 22, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 5 XXW r Mu ' Z'moentor Feb. 9, 1954 M. E. GERLAT 2,668,385

FUSED PLUG AND MULTIPLE TAP FOR ELECTRICAL CORDS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. 22; 1950 XXXVI!) .A U i 3maentor MHT'THEWE seuw- C(ttotueg Patented Feb. 9, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FUSED PLUG AND MULTIPLE TAP FOR ELECTRICAL CORDS This invention relates to improvements in plugs for or for use in connection with electrical cords and extension cords which are to be connected to the usual types of electrical receptacles, and particularly to plugs embodying in their construction fuses for the several conductors of the cords.

The construction of fused plugs is subject to quite contradictory requirements imposed by the uses for and the users of such cords, by conditions to be met to keep the costs of the plug as low as possible, and by safety requirements imposed by state statutes and municipal ordinances, by fire insurance underwriters and by other agencies concerned with the safety of electrical appliances.

It is therefore one object of the present invention to provide a fused plug for an electrical cord, which requires a minimum of parts and a minimum of time for assembly of the plug with the cord.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fused plug for electrical cords, in which strainrelief on the cord, insulation between conductive parts, and other safety requirements are met in a simple manner.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fused electrical plug in which removal and replacement of the fuse or fuses is easily and quickly performed without tools of any kind.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fused plug for electrical cords, in which springs or spring-action members severally press the fuses axially against the prongs to maintain adequate electrical contact between the fuses and the prongs, and in which the springs also provide axial pressure for ejecting the fuses from the plug body upon disengagement of the prongs from the plug body.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrical cord plug with fuses in which the body of the plug provides the sole means for loeating the fuses and for holding the fuses in the desired relation to the prongs and to the cord ends, with which the fuses are to remain in electrical conductive relation.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fused plug for electrical cords in which the cord ends are simply and quickly attached to the conductive elements of the plug, whether the cord and plug are assembled as a factory operation or by individual users of the plug.

And a further object of the invention is to provide amultiple outlet electric plug or tap for insertion in an electrical receptacle and for connection thereto of a plurality of electrical cords, and in which a single pair of fuses within the body of the tap conducts the electric current to all of the electrical cords attached to the tap.

In the present construction, the plug or tap body is formed of two generally similar parts of a dielectric and preferably somewhat resilient material. The body parts are so designed as to provide for easy insertion and removal of the plug or tap in an electrical receptacle and to resist damage to the plug or tap during use. When the plug is designed for use with separate conductors, entry of the electrical cord conductors into the plug is by way of considerably separated apertures, and separate cavities are formed in one body part (female) to receive projections from the other body part (male) for sharply crimping or otherwise holding the conductors to resist tension on or provide strain-relief for the conductors.

Generally similar female and male body parts are likewise utilized where the conductors are combined into a single cord, which enters the plug through a single aperture. The strainrelief is then provided either (or both) by attachment of the cord conductors severally to the contact members held under spring pressure within a chamber formed therefor in the plug body, by compressing the cord as a whole between toothed portions of the plug body parts which may be resilient, by clamping of the separate conductors in a sinuous path inside the plug body, or by a member performing the functions both of an electrical contact and a pressure spring seated Within the plug body.

The plug body and tap parts have a substantially plane surface for contact when the plug is assembled but such surfaces have various complementary projections and depressions for 10- cating the parts relative to each other, and for strengthening the parts.

Each of the body parts (other than the strainrelief portions thereof) is formed with cavities which are identical except in size in the various modifications of the plug and tap. As to the plug, the cavities include, for each conductor, a first chamber for receiving an end of the conductor and a spring combined with a contact member or a separate contact member, and to receive a known type of fuse for conductive contact with the conductor. A second chamber is joined with the first chamber to form a portion of means for locking the fuses and readily releasable plug prongs within the plug or tap body, and a passage connects such second chamber with the end of 3 the plug or tap for entry into the body of the fuses and of a portion of the prongs.

The means for locking the fuse and prong into the plug or tap body includes notches formed in the wall of the second chamber to receive lugs extending from sockets formed on one end of each prong, the sockets severally receiving one end of afuse. Grooves are provided in the entry passageway wallfor inserting the prongs into the second chamber and such chamber is of an axial length not greatly in excess of that required for rotation of the prong lugs therein v H Objects and advantages other than those agave set forth, will be apparent from the following description when read in relation to the accompanying drawings in which I v I Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a firstmodifica' tion of the present plug. I

Fig. 2 is an explodedflperspective view of the first rnodificationof the plug, with a portion of dneplug bodymember cut away.

j3'is an internal view of'on'e (female) body 'portidnjin the first mod fication of the plug, with ajfii'seand a prong in place and another fuse and prong removed.

...,Fig. ,4 is an internal view of the complementary -nia'le body portion of the first modification of the Plus.

Fig. 5 is 'a cross sectional view on the plane of line V'V of Fig. 1 with the fuse and prong removed. I

Fig.1'6isa'cr0ss sectional view on the plane of 'liiijVIVIfof Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is alnjend viewof an assembled plug with 'th fuses -and'prongsremoved therefrom.

g.8 is across sectional view of the plug body asfif"taken on the plane of line VIIIVIII of Figfp I,

'Fig.'9 is an elevation of one formof'a partially formed prong.

Fig. 10isan end view of Fig. 9.

' Fig'. 11 is an elevation of a combined spring- "c'onta'ct'member, v

Fig'. 1211s an end view of the member shown in Fi 11..

' g. 113 is an enlarged sectional viewof a porof the member shown in 'Figs. 11 and 12, showing one meansof attaching a conductor thereto.

Fig. 14 is anaxial sectional view of a modifica- Ltion of the spring-contact member shown in Figs. 1-1',. ;'12 and 13. H

Fig. 15 is a fragm'entary view showing a second modification'o'f a plug body portion.

/ Fig. 16 is a fragmentary. view as if taken on the the plane of line XVIXVI of Fig. 15 with the second form'of plug body portions and an electrical' cord in position for assembling.

17 is a fragmentary view of the body poriftaken on the plane of line XXI XXI of Fig.

'19, butwith the plug body portions in assembled relation.

Fig. 22 is an internal elevational view of a fourth modification of the plug body, with one fuse'a'nd prong removed.

Fig. 23 is a view similar to Fig. 22 of a plug body portion only.

Fig. 24 is a sectional view taken on the plane of line XXIV-XXIV of Fig. 22.

Fig. 25 is a plan view of a tension receiving or strain-relief member employed in the present modification of the plug.

, Fig. 26 is a diametric sectional view of the member shown in, Fig. 25. a t v Fig. 2'7 is an enlarged diametric sectional view of the member shown in Figs. 25 and 26 and with an electrical cord attached thereto.

Fig.-'28 is a plan view of a part forming a combination strain-relief member and spring-contact.

Fig. 29 is 'a perspective view of the member shown in Fig. '28 and with an electrical cord attached thereto.

Fig. 30 isan internal elevational view of a portionof a modified plug body portion with the member of Figs. 28 and 29 inserted therein.

Fig. 31 is a perspective view of another form of combined strain-relief and spring-contact member.

Fig. 32 is an internal elevational view of a plug body portion with the members of Fig. 31 and attached electrical cord conductors in place therein.

Fig. 33 is a sectional view on the plane of line XXXII'I-XXXIII of Fig. 32.

Fig. 34 is a perspective view of a modified form of prong. Fig 35 is a perspective view of the present invention embodied in a multiple outlet tap for receiving plugs at-the ends of a plurality of electrical cords.

Fig 36 is a sectional view on the plane of line XXXVI XXXVI of Fig. 38 and showing an assembled tap with a spring-contact member, a fuseand a prong in place.

Fig. 37 is a sectional view on the plane of line XXXVIIXXXVII of Fig. 36.

Fig. 38 is a sectional view on the plane of line XXXVIIIXXXVIII of Fig. 36.

Fig. 39 is a sectional view on the plane of line XXXIXXXXIX of Fig. 36; and

Fig. 40 is a perspective view of one of the spring-contactmembers utilized in the tap.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1 to 8 of the drawings by reference numerals, the numeral 25 designates a female body part and numeral 26 designatesa' male body part, the two body parts being complementary when assembled. The bodypart 25is formed with a pair of similar cavities 2'] which are severally adapted to receive projections 28 from the body part 26. It will be noted that the projections 28 are severally considerably smaller in thickness than the width of the cavities 2'1 and severally have a notch 29 therein, the projections severally extending into the cavities in' spac'ed relation from the ends of thecavities. Similar grooves 30 and 31 extend severally'irom the cavities 2i and from the sides of theprojections 28 to one of the ends of the plug body parts 25 and 25. I

Pairs of identical cavities 3G, 3'! are formed in both of the plug body parts 25 and 26. When the plug is'assembled, the cavities 3'! coact to provide first chambers connected at one end by grooves 38 and 39'respectively to the cavities 2'1 and the sides of the projections 28. The other endsof the first chambers 36. 3i are'connected with another pair of cavities 40 and 4| to form secone'chambrs which are larger in diameter but of less length than first chambers 36, 31. 'Notches 42" arefoimedin' the wall of the second gees-gees chambers and on a diameter thereof. The second chambers 40, 4| are connected by grooves 43 and 44 coacting in assembled relation of the plug body for forming passages to one end of the plug body, and each such passageway has a pair of rectangular grooves 45 in the wall thereof, which are diametrically opposed when the plug body is assembled.

Each of the body parts is formed with projections 46 from the body parts 25, 26 and with matching notches 41 in such body parts, the projections and notches extending from and into the walls forming the sides of the grooves 43, 44. The projections and notches aid in locating the body parts relative to each other and interrupt the otherwise substantially planar joint between the body parts. The pressure exerted at such joint by the prongs thus acts on considerable masses of the body parts rather than only on adjacent edges of the body parts, which minimizes breakage due to such pressure.

Each of the first chambers 36, 31 is adapted to receive a spring 50 abutting against one end of such chamber and abutting at the other end on a contact member to which the spring may be attached if desired. In the first modification of the invention, the spring is a helical compression spring made of any desired material as such spring is not required to conduct electrical current, but the member 5| is of good conductive material. The conductors 52 of the extension cord are severally attached to the contact members 5| as by soldering.

Prongs (see Figs. 9 and for entering an electrical receptacle, are formed from a strip of metal which is preferably somewhat resilient and with the ends thereof severally formed to provide similar semi-circular portions 51, 58 with rectangular lugs 59 formed from each such portion. The prong strip is then folded to provide somewhat bowed adjacent portions 60, BI and to bring the end portions 51, 58 adjacent in the form of a socket with the lugs 59 in diametrically opposed relation. Each socket 51, 58 is of a diameter to receive the end of a fuse 62 even when the portions forming each prong are pressed together to enter passages 43, 44. The fuse is a type now in general use and requires no particular description.

The spring described above may also be made as shown in Figs. 11 and 13 inclusive in which the spring is Phosphor bronze with a main portion 65 formed as a helix and with the ends of the springs spiraled inwardly in the end turn of the spring to provide substantial circular loops '66. Such loops are of a size to receive the end of a conductor 67 of the electrical cord, for joining the conductor end to the spring as by solder 68. If the conductor-spring connection is to be factory made, the above construction is used. However, if the conductor is to be attached to the spring by individuals to whom solder and soldering means are not readily available, a contact member 69 is applied to the end of the spring and is joined thereto as by solder. The contact member is then formed with a threaded aperture for receiving a screw 10 by which the conductor 61 may be readily attached to the spring in conductive relation.

The construction shown in Figs. 1 to II is particularly adapted for electrical cords where the conductors are separate or easily separable and of small size and are only individually insulated so that a V-bend may be made in such constresses on the plug body parts, the V-bend productors without imposing any considerablle 15 to 21 inclusive.

vidingmore than the amount of strain-relief" usually required by safety regulations. Such cords are usually intended for relatively low currents and the dimensions of the plug parts and the cavities are therefore such as to receive only a fuse of low current carrying capacity. However, when the cords are to be capable of carrying higher currents, the individually insulated conductors are usually combined into a single cord with additional insulation about the joined conductors, such cords then becoming too heavy for the crimping shown in Figs. 5 an 6. The plug body portions to be used for carrying larger currents, are made as shown in Figs. In Figs. 15 to 18 inclusive the body parts are again a female body portion 15 and a male body portion 16, and the first chambers therein are connected by a single semicircular groove 1'! which is connected with a single groove 18 extending to the end of the plug body. In one modification of the plugs, the female body part 15 is formed with a cavity 19 with angular sides and intermediate the ends of the groove 18. Projections are formed on body part 16 to provide a seat for the cord. The material of which the body parts are made, is sufficiently flexible and resilient to allow deflection toward each other of projections 80 upon their entry into cavity 79 in assembling the plug. The

projections have non adjacent sides at an angle which is different from the angle of the sides of cavity 19, and have vertical adjacent sides. Hence, a cord combined of the separately insulated conductors BI, 82 and either with or without additional insulation, may be compressed be tween the projections. The vertical sides of the projection 80 are formed with non-matching vertical, serrations 83 which imbed themselves into the cord when the plug is assembled. If the cord conductor is made of relatively light stranded wires as usual in heavy current extension cords, both the insulation and the conductors of the cord are compressed and deformed to grip th cord tightly in the plug.

Conic or pyramidic projections 84 extend from the wall of the groove 11 in offset or staggered relation so that the separate cord conductors must take a sinuous form when placed into such grooves. Compression of the conductors BI, 82 in the groove 11 about the projections 80 and imbedding of the serrations 83 in such conductors and their insulation provides resistance to movement of the separate conductors and avoids the transmission of tension on the cord beyond such projections and toward the conductorspring joints.

The grooves 18 in the plug body parts may also be made with ribs 88 extending diagonally across grooves 18, as shown in Figs. 19 and 29, the ribs being of such shape and size as to deform the insulation about the individual conductors of the cord and the conductors themselves, if the conductors are multiple thin strands. The deformation of both the insulation and the wire portion of stranded conductors is sufficient to take up any tension on the cord even when such tension is applied in jerks. In any event such deformations have resisted cord movement at continuous tension of more than thirty pounds and have resisted substantially the same pull applied in jerks, each of which forces are more than sufiicient to pull the plug free from any electrical receptacle on the market.

y In assembly, a spring is placed about a conductor and a contact member is attached to the end .sageway into the plugs.

.ceptacle. inserted, the several chambers aid ,the grooves "45 and. the lugs .59 preventing misalignment of the prongs so that ,there can be nobinding or :thecondllctor as .showmin Figs..1.to.l1.-Or the conductor-is .directlyvattached to .aicontacti memher as invFigs. .lltoll. :suchassemb yis. placed in the-first chamber-and,inthegrooveslextending therefrom and adapted to receive .thelconductors. The plugbody parts are thenlocate'jd in correct relation by entering projections .45 v.andlbosses 10 on the male body part into their .respective notches 41 and sockets .191 .on the femalelbody part and the body parts .are .drawn together by the use of bolts 92 and nuts .93. "Theifusesare then severally inserte'd'in sockets-of Lthciprongs and .the prong ends are compressed to .enter .the

lugs thereon .into the .grooves in the entry pas- Axial pressure is e erted .on the ,prong to compress the'spring' until the lugs .enter the second ichamber Where w the prong is given a partial turn 'to (snap th'e'lus into the notches 42, at which Atime theflnrongifis properly aligned for entry intoan electrical fre- During the time the prongs are being action during .the prong insertion.

'In use, when .it is desired '.to inspect or replace a fuse, it is necessary only to ,pressaxially "on a ,prong and to turn the prong inie'ither .direction tobring the'lugs outof ithe notches'fland into alignment with the grooves 145 whereupon the spring will force. the fuse an'dthe prong out of'the plug body. The springs need" have onlyosufficient force to secure adequate contact between the fuse contact and prong, and .theusualsize of prong makes .an amplelhandle for insertion and theremovalof --a fuseandprong without tools andby the average person. I

A modified formofplugiis showninl'Figs; .22 to .27, inclusive, and.differs from the structurepreviouslydescribedin that the body parts now form a first -.chamber.hav.ing a cylindrical portion .96, a 'conical portion' 91 .and another cylindrical ;Dr-

.tion 98. Chamber portion-916 receives a strainrelief-contact member '(shown particularly in -Figs. .25, 26 and v237,) which comprises "a metal disk lfll with a .rim portion .102 ,and a ic'entral aperture I03 defined by pointed .teeth 1114. "In manufacture the --disk jl'lll isshapefd as shown in Fig. 26 whichprovides =,a relativelyflargeaperture 1-03 so that an insulated electrical conductor I maybe readily passed .therethrough. After the electrical conductor. I05 extends 'through the aperture of the strain-relief member, the disk teeth I 04 are pressed or struck .intoithe planeof rim .l02 which forces the points of the teeth through the conductor insulationandinto the pass into cylindrical" cavity 98"for asuflicierit dis- I itance'to'interfere with insertion "of *the fuse fl thereinto.

If desired, the "tension-resisting or strainre- ,lie "function "may be combined with a menib'er performing a contacting functiom in the form in which such 'combined'element is shown in F'igs.

28 and 29. fInsuch *flgures resilient conductive material is again"'form ed with a-clisk-like"-portion 11081 having :an aperture -;defined""by*pointed teeth asabove describedand with a tap or tongue .[0'8 extending therefrom jforflben'ding on itself asshown 29to form a leaf spr ng. {Ihe body .parts then need not have the .conical cavity 198. and the tongue |09.p.erforms the function lof both-a spring .anda .contact.

.In'the structure shown in Figs. ,31 to .33, inelusive, the strain-relief-contact member is formed froma singleresilient piece of metal with .agenerally disk-like portion H3 from which-is struck a tongue Hi4 bent .out ofthe.. plane of the .diskand from which allug .I I5 is bent at an angletothe plane of the The lug lll5 has .anaperture definedlby teeth ,HB similar to the ,te eth previously described, to penetrate 'the insulation .of a cord .into contacting relation with the conductorinthe cord. Thelug I.Il5.also has a plan circular aperturel I! of a size for ready passage therethrough of an insulated conductor. To use the ?strain-reliefQcontact. member [13- Il6, the connector body parts areseverally made with a pair of cavities I20 into which such member seats with slight play and the cavities are severally joined by grooves [21 with a single groove to the end of the plug body part. It is desirable that the cavities I20 be of such shape and size that the lug .I 15 may engage .ajshoulder 122 in the body part, without .materially .displacing contact I it relative to the axis of the first chamber .420, I2! and 98, when the .con-

ductor is attached to the .lug and ,is placedun'der tension. When the conductor is .to be attached, it is first threaded through hole ill and .then bent to enter the hole ,definedby teeth I I5 where the electrical connection .ismade. lI-Iole ,H'I is slightly ofiset from groove I21 so that tension .on the cord is resisted by several bends the .cord as it passes from the connection through .the plain aperture and from such aperture through the-groove 12 and out of the .plug.

Fig. 33 shows interlocking vof the body parts by a rib ,125 extending peripherally about one body part and engaging in a complementary groove in the other body part. Such interlock provides for simpler molds and molding than the structures previously described but requires :use -of two molds as .compared to only one mold whenthe interlock of .Figs. 1 to -7 is used.

Fig. 34 illustrates a :modified form of prong in that the'socket halves are now formed to provide "three separate tongue-like members at each end of the :prong strip, the :several pairs of tongues L26 andJZJcoacting to form a'socket forreceiv- .ing-the fuse-B2 and'a tongue I, 2- 8 forming one ,of

.a pair of .lugsfor holding the prone and fuse in the booly as previously described. The present "socket construction allows shaping of the pairs of tongues I26 and I2! .to form .a socket of exactly the size and shapeof the fuse end to grip the .fuse end sufficiently firmly for movement of the fuse and prong as .a single element in vthe insertion and removal thereof as previously -described. The lug I28 is now of greater length provide a pair of first and second chambers for respectively receiving a contact member and fuse and for receiving the prong socket ends when the parts are assembled. The first chambers are formed by cavities I35, I36 and I3! in each connector body part. Each body part is provided with two apertures I38 and I39 leading from a first chamber and spaced to receive the prongs of a plug on an extension cord to be connected with the tap.

A resilient metallic contact member is shown in Fig. 40 and is generally designated I42. Such member provides a bar portion I43 from which strips extend and are bent on themselves to provide a pair of resilient contacts I44 and I45 adjacent the ends of the bar, and a contact I46 intermediate the end contacts. It will be noted that each of the two contact members I42 extends across the joint of the two body parts with the bar portion I 45 resting on a partition I50 separating the first and second chambers when the body parts are assembled. The contact members I42 are so mounted in the first chamber as to present the'bow or bend of the contacts I44, I45 toward the several apertures I38 and I39. Each of the contacts I44 and I45 is of such length that the free ends thereof severally rest on a wall of cavities I35 in line with the apertures I38 and I39 under pressure due to the form of the contacts I44 and I45, so that extension cord plug prongs are firmly gripped between the cavity wall and the contacts upon insertion of the plug prongs into the tap. Each of the contacts I46 extends into a cavity I36 and is bent on itself so that the free end of the contact extends across the cavity I31 to bear on an end of a fuse 62 in cavity I31 and with considerable pressure produced by forming the contact as a relatively long leaf spring.

The two second chambers in the assembled tap are formed by cylindrical cavities I54 with a groove I55 in each cavity wall and with a pair of notche I56 in diametric relation in a wall of each groove. The end portions of the cavity I54 adjacent the end of the bo y part are provided also with two grooves I! which are also diametrically related and are preferably placed on a diameter at a right angle to the diameter through the notches I56. The grooves I51 provide for entry of the prong lugs into the second chamber where the prong is located and held in the manner previously described.

The two tap body parts I33 and I34 may be provided with either of the disclosed forms of joint surface interlock.

The prongs employed in the multiple tap are of the form shown previously in Fig. 34 and need not be again described.

' The advantages resulting from the above constructions are clearly seen if the constructions are cons dered from the separate viewpoints of a manufacturer, insurance underwriters, and users. From the manufacturers viewpoint the constr'uction is especially attractive because of the small number of parts required, thus requiring a minimum of'tooling and low inventory. All of the constructions are exceptionally easy to make because all of the metal parts are resilient so that no close tolerances are required. The constructions are easy to assemble because only pressure or a blow with a suitable tool, will attach the conductors to the contacts, the metal parts snap intoiplace rather than reouiring fastening in the body'parts, the joint surfa'ces of the body parts are interlocked to avoid shifting during riveting or placing of a screw and the fuses and prongsare inserted last so that there can be no fuse breakage or damage to the prongs.

From the viewpoint of underwriters, the structures are desirable because the parts are subjected to only a minimum of stresses during assembly, the electrical connections are not sub-' jected to strain which is taken up either in the connector body directly or by bearing of the contact members on the body. The conductors are permanently electrically connected with the contact members and the fuses are held only resiliently and not subjected to any material mechanical stresses.

From the viewpoint of the user, it is never necessary to disassemble the structures for the purpose of tightening a contact-cord connection, the two conductive paths within the connector are completely separated at all times, the fuses are removable and replaceable without tools,

and breakage of a fuse would not be dangerous and the broken fuse fragments can be easily removed.

Because of the fact that the present inventionis applicable both to plugs attached to electrical cords and to multiple outlet electrical taps. the word connector is used as a term generic to both the above articles.

I claim:

1. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined for coacting in defining a plurality of chambers there n and severally open from one end of the body for severally receiving the fuses, and prongs severally in ertable into the body for several electrical connection thereof with the fuses and removable from the body through the open ends of the chambers after the body parts are joined, the prongs being adapted to enter the electrical receptacle.

2. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined for coacting in defining a pair of axially aligned and joined first and second chambers, the second chambers be ng open at one end thereof for severally receiving the fuses. and prongs severally insertable into the second chamber for several electrical connection with the fuses, the prongs and fuses being manually insertable and removable from the body after the body parts are joined.

3. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, aplurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined for coacting in defining a plurality of chambers therein and open from one end of the body for severally receiving the fuses, and resilient metallic prongs compressible for insertion through the open ends of and expansible into engagement with the chambers in several conductive relation with the fuses, the prongs and the fuses being severally removable from and replaceable in the body in the assembled relation of the body and as a unit.

4. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a plurality of-electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined for coaction in defining'a plurality of aligned and-joined chamberstherein and open from one end'of'theb'odyfor severally receiving the fuses, and prongs inserta ble into the body for several electrical connection with the fuses and removable from the body through the open ends of'the chambers after the body parts are joined, the prongshaving sockets atone end for severally receiving an end of afuse andbeing manually engageable in the chambers for retaining the fuses in the body.

5. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors'to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a plurality of e1ectrica1 insulating body parts adapted to be joined-for coaction in defining a pair'of axially aligned first and second chambers; the pairsof chambers being severally open at one end thereof for severally receiving the fuses. the second chambers severally having a groove in the wall thereof and notches-in aside wall of the groove, and prongs manually inserta-- from one end of'theibody for severally receiving,

the fuses, the second chambers severally having a groove in the wall thereof and notches in aside wall of the groove, and resilient prongs having a resilient socket at one end thereof for receiving an end of a fuse, the prongs severally having resilient lugs extending from the sides of the sockets for entry into the second chamber grooves for engagement in the notches thereof.

'7. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle andfor removably receiving the individual fuses for the con.- ductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined forlcoaction in defining a plurality of chambers open from one end of the body for severally receiving the fuses, resilient means severally connectible with the conductors and severally retained in one ofthe body'chambers for individually urging-the fuses out of the chambers through the open end thereof, and prongs severally insertable into the'chambers for retaining the fuses therein in electrical connection with the resilient means, and a fuse and prong body insertable into and removable from the body, as a unit through their-respective chance ber open. ends after the. body. parts are joined.

8-. In a connector for. attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for theconductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined. ion jointly defining a plurality of chambers open from one end ofithe body for severally receiving the fuses, contacts each having a portionformedas a leaf spring, the contacts being severally connectible-with the conductors and severally retained in a body chamber, the. leaf spring portions of the contacts individually acting on; the; fuses :forr urging the: fuses toward theopenendofthe-chambers; and prongs insertablednto the body for retaining-the fuses therein: and insertableinto. and" removable: from the body after'the body parts'arejoined 9. In a connector for'attaching electricalcomductors to an electrical receptacle and'for remov ably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body. parts adapted to be joined for jointly defining a plurality of chambers therein for severally receiving the fuses, the chambers severally having an end open at one end of the connector, contacts severally connected with the-conductors and severally retained'in a body chamber for engagement severally with the fuses, the conductors being severally mechanically engaged with the contacts inv addition to: the electrical connection therewith to pressv the contacts-severally against abody surface upon tensioningof theconductors; and prongs severally insertableinto the cham-.-- bers'for retainingthe fuses therein and removable therefrom after'the body parts are joined. the fuses and'prongs'being severally insertable as a .unitthrough theopenchamber ends at that end of the body in contact with the receptacle:

when the connector-is in use;

l0. Ina 'COIlIlBCtOITfO! attaching electrical corrductors to an electrical receptacle and'for removably receiving the individual fuses for-the conductors; a pluralityof electrical insulatingrbodyparts adapted tobe joined for jointly definingra plurality: of aligned andjoined: first and'second chambers; the second chambers being open from: one end of the bodyfor severally receiving the fuses, the second chambers severally having a groove inthe wall thereof-and notchesin axside wall of-the groove, contactsseverally havingpor" tions forminga spring and being severally con.- nected. with theconductors, and severally retained in a. chamber, the springportion-ofthe contacts acting on the-fusefor: urging the fuse toward the open end of the chamber, and resilient prongs havingva socket at oneend thereof for receivingan end'of. afuse andforinser-- ticn andremoval'of arprongtanda fuse: as-aunit, the-prongs severally having resilient lugs extend? ing from the-sides of the" sockets forentry into the secondchamber grooves for-t rotation therein into. and out of engagement in the notches thereof whereby the prongs arepositioned for entry into the receptacle.

11. In a'connector-for attachingelectrical conductors; to an electrical receptacle" and for; re, movably receiving the individual fuses for-the conductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to bejoinedfor'ceaction in defining a plurality of chambers therein, the chambers being open at: one end of thee-connector forseverally receiving the fuses, projections formed on one of the body'partsfor entry-into a socket in the other body-part for grippingthe conductors to resisttension thereon and'prongs insertable into the body for several electrical connection with the fuses and removable from the body afterthebody parts are joined, the prongs being adapted'to enter the electrical. receptacle.-

12. In a connector for-attachinginsulated.electrical conductors toxan. electrical receptacle-and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a. plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted tobe joined for coaction in defining a plurality-of open-ended chambers for severally.receiving,thev fuses, the chambers being-connected with-a grooveshavingprojections from the: wall?therecfffonrembcdment: loathe-in:- sulation of'rthe: electrical; conductorsto: resist 13 movement of the conductors relative to the body upon tensioning of the conductors, and prongs insertable into the chambers for several electrical connection with the fuses and removable therefrom after the body parts are joined, the 5 prongs being adapted to enter the electrical receptacle.

13. In a connector for attaching electrical conductors to an electrical receptacle and for removably receiving the individual fuses for the conductors, a plurality of electrical insulating body parts adapted to be joined for jointly defining a plurality of open-ended chambers for severally receiving the fuses, the chambers being connected by a groove having staggered projections from the walls thereof for holding the conductors separately in sinuous relation in the groove to movable from the body when the body parts are joined.

MATTHEW E. GERLAT.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,969,301 Edwards Aug. 7, 1934 2,030,016 McIntosh Feb. 4, 1936 2,375,472 Hollins May 8, 1945 2,406,154 Medlin Aug. 20, 1946 2,419,152 Mosebach Apr. 15, 1947

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2794094 *May 28, 1954May 28, 1957Grosso Grant Jose ConstantionElectric plug
US2825039 *Mar 24, 1954Feb 25, 1958California Research CorpConnector for detector cable
US2828387 *Feb 24, 1954Mar 25, 1958Slawik Albert EAdjustable fused plug
US2875295 *Apr 19, 1954Feb 24, 1959Lindeman Jr Charles ADuplex electrical fused wall outlet
US2905791 *May 3, 1956Sep 22, 1959Ite Circuit Breaker LtdMeans to position and secure current limiting fuses in a housing
US2910562 *Apr 29, 1955Oct 27, 1959Mc Graw Edison CoProtectors for electric circuits
US3320385 *Jul 28, 1965May 16, 1967U S Servicator CorpElectrical connector for tapping power from an insulation covered conductor
US4025146 *Nov 10, 1975May 24, 1977Michele FamigliettiElectrical connection devices
US4034284 *Aug 8, 1975Jul 5, 1977Ideal Industries, Inc.Pull surfaces for insertion and removal of the tester
US4080039 *Jan 13, 1977Mar 21, 1978Ahroni Joseph MFusable electrical plug
US4176902 *Oct 27, 1977Dec 4, 1979Bel Fuse Inc.Method for fusing male plug at end of power line cord
US4194805 *Feb 6, 1976Mar 25, 1980Bunker Ramo CorporationElectrical contacting element
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US4350407 *May 22, 1980Sep 21, 1982Tung Ming Electrical Co. Ltd.Safety lamp plug
US4412715 *Jan 12, 1981Nov 1, 1983Virginia Patent Development Corp.Modular electrical plug incorporating conductive path
US4420214 *Feb 14, 1980Dec 13, 1983Wu Jeng ShyongElectrical plug and socket having replaceable overcurrent-protection device provided with safety latch means
US4648675 *Jul 2, 1986Mar 10, 1987Trine Products Corp.Electrical connection apparatus for lighting fixtures
US4738639 *May 28, 1987Apr 19, 1988Electri-Wire CorporationElectrical plug
US5270679 *Feb 8, 1993Dec 14, 1993Gould Inc.Split end plate fuse assembly
US5894258 *Mar 3, 1998Apr 13, 1999Chang; Yen ChunStructure of combination type fusible plugs
USRE31017 *Mar 31, 1980Aug 24, 1982Bel Fuse Inc.Method for fusing male plug at end of power line cord
Classifications
U.S. Classification337/198, 337/213, 439/465, 337/201
International ClassificationH01R31/00, H01R13/58, H01R13/68, H01R13/595, H01R31/02
Cooperative ClassificationH01R31/02, H01R13/595, H01R13/68
European ClassificationH01R13/68