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Publication numberUS2669389 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1954
Filing dateMar 13, 1951
Priority dateMar 13, 1951
Publication numberUS 2669389 A, US 2669389A, US-A-2669389, US2669389 A, US2669389A
InventorsDavis Raymond G, Mesi Michael J
Original AssigneeDavis Raymond G, Mesi Michael J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boxing scoreboard
US 2669389 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

,1954 M. J. MES] ETAL BOXING SCOREBOARD I5 Sheets$heet 1 Filed March 15, 1951 OOOOOO INVENTORS M/C/IQQ/ d Mes/ ATTORNEYS Feb. 16, 1954 M. J. MESI ET AL BOXING SCOREBOARD Filed March 15, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 MM/m ATTORNEYS 1954 M. J. MES! ETAL BOXING SCOREBOARD 3 Sheets-Sheet 55 Filed March 13, 1951 INVENTORS M/c/zae/ 1/. Mes/ Ra Ymono G. 00 via ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 16, 1 954 OFFICE BOXING SCOREBOARD Michael J. Mesi and Raymond G. Davis, Portland, Oreg.

Application March 13, 1951, Serial No. 215,316

7 Claims.

This invention relates to an electrical score board for boxing matches.

The broad objects and general purpose of the invention will be better appreciated when it is realized that boxing is the only spectator sport in which the spectators are given no ofiicial knowledge or information on the progress of the light and the relative standings of the contestants until after the match is finished. The conventional practice of withholding the announcement of the points earned by each contestant frequently produces much discord and dissatisfaction among the spectators, and provokes question as to the soundness of the final ofiicial decision, because the spectators, as well as the contestants, have no way of knowing the decisions of the judging oflicials in each round, as the fight progresses. This is particularly true after a number of close rounds where the oilicials themselves are not in agreement.

It is, accordingly, the general object of the present invention to provide a score board to indicate, round by round, the number of points awarded to each contestant by each judging official, as well as to indicate the cumulative total of points awarded to each contestant at all times during the fight. A further object is to provide suitable mechanism for indicating and adding up the points awarded to each contestant and to provide mechanism for withholding the indication of the judges decisions in each round until all the judges have made their decisions, the decisions of all the judges then being indicated simultaneously. It is believed that a score board which will accomplish these results will promote greater interest in and understanding of the sport and will achieve more uniformity and soundness in the decisions of the judging ofiicials. Further objects and advantages will become apparent as the description proceeds in connection with the accompanying drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment of the apparatus, but it is to be understood that various changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of parts, and all such modifications are included in the invention. The invention is not necessarily limited to boxing score boards as certain features may be applied to tallying or scoring for other purposes.

In general, the present score board comprises a plurality of lights for illuminating or forming numbers to indicate the number of the round, the decisions of the officials, round by round, and the cumulative total or points acquired by each contestant. The judging ofiicials are provided with individual scoring boxes having selector knobs to designate the number of points awarded to the contestants. When the official has made his decision, he presses a scoring button on his box, and when all the officials have pressed their scoring buttons, their individual decisions for the round appear simultaneously on the score board. Totalizer mechanisms then go into action to add the points awarded in the new round to the previously earned points of each contestant. An additional control box is provided for the timekeeper, having a push button to change the number of the round and clear the board of the indication of points awarded in the preceding round and a second push button connected with reset mechanism to clear the whole board for a new fight.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a view showing the score board and control boxes of a preferred embodiment of the invention; and

Figures 2 and 3 comprise a schematic wiring diagram illustrating the electrical equipment and circuits of the score board and control boxes, the wiring diagram being divided in two parts and Figure 3 constituting a continuation of the same diagram shown in Figure 2.

Referring first to Figure 1, the score board it] comprises a large panel mounted in a position where it may be viewed by the spectators, and, preferably, also, by the contestants. Ordinarily, two or more of these score boards would be provided for the opposite ends or sides or the arena, so that at least one of the score boards may be viewed easily from any point in the arena. One of these score boards is a master score board containing most of the operating mechanism of the system, and for the purpose of illustration the score board I0 is designated as the master score board. Additional score boards are not shown as they may be connected to the master in an obvious manner. The score board ii! is connected with an electric supply circuit Ii and a plurality of electric cables [2, l3, I i and 15, leading to the respective control boxes 26 to 23. These control boxes may be disposed at the side of the fighting ring for the use of the usual four ofiicials. Control box 2! is the timekeepens box, and is equipped with a round step-up push button 24 and a reset switch button 25.

Control boxes 2|, 22 and 23 are identical, for the use of the usual three judging oficials, and corresponding parts are designated by the same reference numerals. In order to distinguish between the different ofiicials, the box ii is designated as the referee's scoring box, box 22 as judge No. ls scoring box, and box 23 as judge No. 2s

scoring box. Each box contains a selector switch 26 which may be turned to different positions to award various numbers of points to black or white, or to a mid point to E when the two contestants are adjudged to be even in a particular round. Numeral 21 indicates a switch button which is designated as a scoring button to be pressed by the judging ofiicial after he has made his selection on switch 25 in a particular round. Numeral 28 indicates a selection made light which is illuminated when the button 2'! is pressed to indicate that that official has made his decision.

Referring again to the score board iii, the latter is equipped with a plurality of display sections to. display the desired information. Preferably, across the top of the board isa round number display section 3%] containing numerals which may be illuminated in sequence to indicate the number of the round. In the center of the board are a referees decision displaysection 3|, a. display section 52 for the decision of judge'No- 1, and a display section 33 for the decision of judge No. 2. The display sections 38 to 33 may be formed in different ways, but, inview of the fact that the numbers to be displayed in these sections are never very large, it is preferred to frame each number individually so that the desired number can be illuminated by switching on a lighting unit behind the number or in some equivalent manner. The arrangement is such that the number is inconspicuous when its light is out, whereby selected numbers may be illuminated to indicate the round number and. points awarded. The numbers in display sections 3!, 32 and 33 correspond to the indicated positions of selector switches 26, the apparatus being adaptable to different boxingrules in difierent localities.

A feature of the invention, which will presently be explained in greater detail, is that the points awarded in a particular round by the judging ofiicials are not displayed until all three officials have completed their selections independently. Thus, if the referee makes his decision first, he can set his switch it accordingly andthen press his scoring button 21 which will introduce the information into the electrical system and illuminate the light 2.8 on his scoring box, but will not produce an immediate indication of his decision on the scoreboard. Assuming judge No. 2 isthe next to make his descision, he sets h-is'selector switch 26- and presses his button 2-1, but his decision does not appearon the judge No. 2 display section 33 on the score board. Then, when judge No. 1 makes his decision, he adjusts his selector switch 26 and presses his scoring button'z'l'. Certain preparatory circuits already having beenestablished by the referee and judge No. 2, the pressing of the third switch button 21 now causes the information transmitted at difierent times by all three ofiicials to be displayed simultaneously in the three display sections 3|,32 and 33. Thus, the spectators and contestants are apprised of the decision of each official onthe round just ended as soon as, but not before, the last official has made his decision on his score box. If the decision of one of the oiiicia-ls is at considerable variance with the decisions-of the other two and perhaps quite contrary to the general opinion of the spectators, that fact will be made known immediately, and the judgments of the various oflicials can be appraised by the spectators as the fight progresses.

The points awarded by each oilicial in a round are preferably allowed to remain displayed in the display sections 3|, 32 and 33 during the following intermission. At the end of each intermission, the timelreeper presses his round step-up switch 25 to extinguish all the lights in these sections. This operation of switch 24 also changes the round number in display section 38.

When the last ofiicial makes his decision and the three decisiom are displayed, other events also occur in the score board apparatus. At the bottom of the score board it, there is a display section 3% to indicate the cumulative total of points awarded to one contestant and a display section 35 to indicate the cumulative total of points awarded to the other contestant. The display section ti comprises a units monogram section 36, a tens monogram section 31, and a hundreds section 38. In orderto distinguish the corresponding sections with reference to the two contestants, the units, ten and hundreds sections are designated by numerals 39, t5 and M in the display sectiondfi. When the third. judging official records his decision by pressing his scoring button 2 the various numbers of points displayed in the display sections 3!, S2 and 33 are added." in to one or the other, or both, as the case may be, of the cumulative totals in the display sections 38. and 35 by electrical totalizer apparatus which will presently be described in detail. The sections 36, 3?, as and 26 comprise groups of lights. which may be energized in the proper combinations to form digits from zero to 9-, as may be selected. Sections fig-and All. are madetov display invention is to disclose to the spectators who-sup port the sport any chronic variance of some particular ofiicial so that incompetent ofiicials will be revealed and replaced with better oficials, to the betterment of the sport. In any event, thefinal decision cannot come as a surpriseto-the spectators when they can see how the points are awarded, round by round. The score board will eliminate many misunderstandings between the spectators and the officials and enhance public confidence in competent oificials.

Having now described the general features of the score board and the manner in whichthe scoring is made and displayed, the electrical systernf-or producing the desired indications will be described with reference to Figures 2 and 3. Figures 2 and 3 comprise a single schematic diagram in which the left hand part of the diagram. 7

appears on the sheet of Figure 2 and the right hand part on the sheet of Figure 3. The principal components of the system for producing the scoring functions described comprisea plurality of relays, totalizer mechanisms, rotary contact devices and reset solenoids. Where the same elements are duplicated a number of times, all of the duplicated elements are not illustrated. Figures 2 and 3 include only one scoring box, one totalizer unit and one cumulative point display section, the major electrical connections for the missing components being indicated.

Thus, in FigureZ the numeral 56 designates the referee relay, it being understood that there is also a second similar relay for judge No. 1 and a third similar relay for judge No. 2. Relay 5| is designated as a round step-up relay and relay 52 is designated as a lock relay. Relay 53 is a reset relay, and relay 54 i an alternator relay. The same numerals are used to designate the relays in their entirety and also the solenoid coils thereof.

The points awarded to each contestant in each round are counted at the end of the round by a counting unit 55 which includes a count index solenoid 55, and a motor 51. The various parts of the counting unit are separated in the diagram but may be identified with reference to the common shaft A.

In Figure 3, numeral 66 designates, generally, a round step-up unit actuated by a round stepup solenoid GI and a round reset solenoid 62. Round number display section 36 is represented by a series of lights bearing the same reference numeral. The lights in the monogram sections 36, 31 and 38 are energized in the proper combinations by a plurality of contact discs mounted on a shaft B in totalizer unit 65. Shaft B is rotated in one direction for scoring purposes by a step-up solenoid 66 and in the reverse direction to clear the board by a reset solenoid 61. Also mounted on the shaft B are units, tens and hundreds cams II, I2 and I3 for operating a plurality of switches, as shown, the parts being separated for convenience of illustration.

The system is energized from a 110-volt supply I! having a branch wire 16 in Figure 2 and a branch wire 1! in Figure 3 leading to certain components. Transformer l3 provides reduced voltage for a 50-volt supply circuit 86, a 20-volt supply circuit 8|, and a 6-volt supplycircuit 82. These different voltages are most suitable for the difierent types of equipment used in the system, but it is to be understood that a single voltage supply may be used where all the equipment is of the same voltage rating. Transformer 18 is repeated in Figure 3 for convenience in tracing the circuits between the two sheets of drawings. Circuit 82] energizes supply wires 83, 84 and I5 in Figure 2 and supply wires I92, 85 and 250 in Figure 3. Circuit 8I energizes supply wires I60 and I62 in Figure 2 and supply wires 86 and 81 in Figure 3. Circuit 82 energizes supply wires 88 and 69 in Figure 3.

Referee relay 56 is energized by a pair of wires 96 and SH. Wire 96 connects with supply wire 83 through a normally closed switch 92 on reset relay 53, the other contact of switch 82 being connected to wire 93. Wire 9| is connected to wire 94 leading to one terminal of switch 21 on the referees box 2I. The other terminal of switch 21 connects through wire 85 to supply wire 84. Wire portions 90a and 96b connect with the relays for the other two judging oflicials, not shown, corresponding with relay 56.

The lights in the referees display section 3| in Figure 1 are also designated by the same numeral 3! in Figure 2 for convenience of identification. Selector switch 26 has two mutually insulated switch arms 96 and 91. Switch arm 96 is connected to a wire 93 and the series of contacts 99 engaged by this switch arm are connected directly to the lights 3|. The other terminals of lights 3I are connected to supply wire I66. Wire 98 is connected with one arm of a normally open switch I I'JI on lock relay 52, the other arm of this switch being connected with supply wire I I32. Wire portions 98a and 98b, and Iillla and Iililb, supply the other two scoring boxes which are not included in Figure 2. Wire portions I62a and I02b supply the indicator lights 28 on the other two scoring boxes. Similarly, wire portions 16a and 76b connect with the switch arms 91 on the other two scoring boxes.

One terminal of light 28 on the scoring box is connected with supply wire I62 and the other terminal is connected with a wire I56 leading to one arm of a normally open switch I61 on the referee relay 5s. The other arm of switch I61 is connected with a wire I38 leading to supply wire I66.

One terminal of lock relay solenoid 52 is connected directly to supply wire 83 and the other terminal is connected to a wire IID leading to one arm of a normally open switch III on the referee relay 5B. The other arm of this switch is connected with supply wire 84 through two switches IIIa, Hit), in series. The judge No. 1 and No. 2 control boxes, not included in the wiring diagram, are connected with two relays, not shown, which are similar to the referee relay 56 and include the switches Mia and NH), corresponding to the switch III.

The referees relay 58 also includes a normally open switch IIZ having one switch arm connected with wire 94 and the other switch arm connected with a wire I I3. Lock relay 52 includes a second normally open switch I i5 having one switch arm connected directly with supply wire 84 and a second switch arm connected with a wire I I6.

The solenoid of round step-up relay 5I has one terminal connected directly to supply wire 83 and its other terminal connected with a wire Ill leading to round step-up switch 24 in timekeepers box 25. This relay includes a normally closed switch IIS and a normally open switch IIS. One arm of switch II 3 is connected with wire H3 and the other arm is connected to supply wire 83. One arm of switch H9 is connected with supply wire 84 and the other arm is connected with a wire I20 which continues on to Figure 3.

The solenoid of reset relay 53 has one terminal connected to supply wire 83 and its other terminal connected to the two wires IEI and I22, the latter connecting with one of three terminals in timekeepers reset switch Relay 53 has a normally closed switch 92 and three normally open switches I26, 52? and I28. One arm of switch I26 is connected with wire 93 and the other arm is connected with a wire I29. One arm of switch I2! is connected to wire IZI and the other arm is connected to a wire I25 leading to Figure 3. One arm of switch 28 is connected to a branch supply wire wt and the other arm is connected to wire I iii.

The solenoid of alternator relay 54 has one terminal connected to supply wire 83 and its other terminal connected to the two wires i3I and I32. This relay has two normally closed switches I33 and i and two normally open switches I 35 and One arm of switch I35 is connected to wire I IS and the other arm is connected to wire i3i. One arm of switch 533 is connected to wire i It} and the other arm is connected to wire I31. The two switches iBs and I36 have a common central arm connected with wire I 5I. This arm normally maxes contact with a top arm connected with a wire I38 when the solenoid is deenergized. Wire I33 continues on to the totalizer unit in Figure 3. When the solenoid is energized, this central switch arm makes contact with a bottom arm connected with c eeses wire tlfl which continues ontoithe idthertotalizer unit; not shown.

;-Motor '5'! drives: a shaft -A icarryingr a p-air is insulated switch arms Hi4 and I45, a countind'excdisc lfilliiaand' a zresetrcam 1M7. Switch::arm I engages only with a pairiof stationary iconta'cts M8 and 169' connected with-the. wires efi and .132, respectively.

.Switch .arm M5 is connected with wire SIS-'I' and wipes 1 a circle of. contacts designated generally by the numeral I50. The contacts in this Icircle are spaced apart :a distance greater thanut'he width of the. switch arm :so that the circuit through wire I 5 I is interrupted .as the arm moves from one contact tothe .next. The spaces between the contacts to be energized may be fitted with an equal number of dead con'tacts inot shown) .to make the switch-arm ride smoothly around the circle. The single-contacts I52 and I53 are connected to the respective contacts :in the series 154 underthe switch arm-97 cor-responding to the first black and white posit'ions, respectively, of the selector switch'knob 2-6 as shown inFigure 1. The circle of contacts I54-has a'centraldead contact I55 which is not-connected with any of the contacts in the circle 'I'50.' Switch arm 91 rests on the dead contact I55 whenthe selector knob 2c is in the even position giving no points to either contestant.

Numerals I56 and i5! designate groups of two interconnected contacts connected with respective single contacts in the contact circle I54 corresponding to the two different two-point positions of the switch knob 26. Similarly, the reference numerals I58 and 159 designate groups of three interconnected contacts, and numerals H and IBI designate groups of four interconnect-ed tiontacts, each group being connectedto one of the contacts in the circle 154 having a corresponding point value for'one of the contestants. The arrangement is such that when the selector knob 25 is placed in its 'E position, switch arm 91 rests on dead contact I and the circuit through-wire I5I is not energized when switch arm M5 driven by motor 5! passes over the circle of contacts I50. However, if switch arm 9'! rests on-one of-the other contacts in the circle of contacts I54; a-certain number of contacts in the circle 1-59 will thus be energized, causing the circuit I5I to be energized momentarily a corresponding number of times in quick succession when the arm M5 sweeps around the circle of contacts "I50. The remaining portions of the circle of contacts I50, not shown connected in Figure 2, are, in practice, connected in a similar manner torthe scoring boxes 22 and 23 of the two judges; not shownin Figure 2. Thus, it is apparent that twenty contacts are necessary for each scoring box; making a total of sixty active contacts in the circle I 50.

The contacts in circle I59 which-are energized by the three selector switch knobs-26 transmit pulse signals to the totalizer units when switch arm M5 makes a complete revolution, counting up the points awarded by all the judging ofiicials. Means will presently be described for separating the count for one contestant from the other count.

Oneterminal of count motor 51 is connected to a wire I79 leading to the supply wire 84; and the other terminal is connected to the two wires :29 and Ill. Wire i'lI leads tohone arm ofa switch I12 which has its other arm connected with supply wire 33. Count index disc I 45 is'provided with anotch l'lewhich isnormally engagedby a :lever 1-14 connected with-the armature 1:15-hffsolenoida56. One termlnal iof IhiSiSQlEIlDid is =connected with wire 13?, andlthe other terminal-.isconnected with a'wire lleleadingto supply wire =83. .When solenoid 5B is energized, armature I l5'zisiidrawniinto the :solenoid .to close the switch I12 and withdraw lever I14 from the notch I l3-t'o release the countdisc I 48 for rotation.

"IResetvcam M1 cooperates with a switch II'I to close and-open this switch repeatedly as shaftA revolves. This cam is positively connected to shaft 1A to revolve whenever the motor is operated-but switch arms -144, M55 and disc -'I 45 I are driven by a friction clutch M6 and are held againstwotationby lever I14 when the motor is operated for :reset.

i Onearmof switch IT! is connected with wire I3I,-and theotherarm is connected with a wire H8 havingtwo-branches H9 and I853 connecting with thetwo reset solenoids which remove-the monogram numbers from the two display sections'34 and 35 at the end of the tight. The wire mil-continues onto Figure 3 where it is-connected with :resetasolenoid 5?. -Wire HE connects with the rest-solenoid in the other totalizer, not shown.

Referring now-more particularly to Figure 3, the displaysect ion 30 comprises a plurality of lights :for indicating the number of the round, each light having one terminal connected with supply wire 8'! and its other terminal connected with one of a series of contacts I arrangedin a sem'i-circle in the round step-up unit 56. 'The series-of contacts 85 is swept by a switch arm connected with a ratchet wheel 181.

Ratchet wheel I3! is held in indexed positions with switch arm E36 resting on one of the series of'contacts I85, bymeans of an indexinglever its. Indexing lever I88 is connected with an armature I89 in round reset solenoid 62 torelease the ratchet wheel for rotation when the solenoid is energized. This leverand-armature are normally urged toward indexing position-by spring action. Ratchet wheel I8? is also engaged by a step-up pawl connected with an armatu-re I9 I-in roundstep-unsolenoid 5|. The ratchet wheel is spring returned in one direction and magnetically advanced in the opposite direction one step by each stroke of the armature IQ I.

One terminal of solenoid Si is connected with wire I20, and the other terminalisconnected with supply wire Ie2. One terminal of 'round reset solenoid- E2 is connected with supply wire I92, and the other terminal is connected with wire I'93'which continues on from referees push button switch 25 in Figure 2 to one arm of a'switch I95. -Switch 1 95 is normally held open by the spring action of armature E89 and is released to closed position when this armature is drawn into the-solenoid '32 to release the ratchet wheel 13?. The otherarm of switch 495 is connected to a wire "555 leading to one arm of aswitch Iill, the other arm or" the latter switch being conne'cte with supply wire 85. a r l V i 1 Switch I9? is normally closed, but one of the switch arms is elongated at I98 to project into the'path of a pin I99 which is rotatable with switch arm I86. Pin ice engages the armi98 to open the switch it? when the switch arm H35 reaches its zero position extinguishing all the lights in the display section 30.

The units, tens and hundreds display sections 36, 3?, and 38- in Figure l are controlled by totalizing unit 55 shown in Figure 3, and the other monogram sections 39, 59, and ti are controlled by a second similar totalizing unit: not shown. For convenience of illustration :in; the

schematic diagram the totalizing unit 65 has been dismembered to show the individual contact arms of the switches associated with the three cams 'II, I2, and '53 on the shaft B. The units cam 'II and twenty-four contact discs for the twentyfour lights in the units section 36 are keyed to the shaft B. The position of cam 'II is indicated in phantom on shaft B. The tens cam I2 and twenty-four contact discs for the twenty-four lights in tens section 31 are fixed on a sleeve 2| I which is rotatable on the shaft B, the position of cam I2 being indicated again in phantom. The hundreds cam I3, indicated in phantom, and a single contact disc 29! are mounted on a second sleeve 290 on the shaft to cooperate with a contact finger 202 to turn the six lights in hundreds section 38 on and off.

Step-up solenoid 66 has an armature 295 equipped with a pawl to advance ratchet wheel 206, keyed on shaft B, step by step in one direction. Reset solenoid 61 has an armature 260 equipped with a pawl to rotate a similar but reversed ratchet wheel 26! step by step in the opposite direction to clear the board. These solenoids are connected with the common supply wire I! which has a branch 110. for the corresponding solenoids in the other totalizer unit, not shown.

Shaft B carries a one tooth gear 29! to rotate a ten tooth gear 208 one tooth in each revolution of shaft B. Gear 298 is integrally connected with a second gear 209 in driving engagement with a gear 2 I on sleeve 2I I which carries the tens cam I2 and the contact discs for the twenty-four lights 31. A few of the units contact discs are shown on the shaft B designated by the numeral 2| 2 and a few of the tens contact discs on the sleeve 2 I I are indicated by the numeral 25-3.

Sleeve 2II carries a one-tooth gear 2I5 which is arranged to advance a ten tooth gear 2 I6 one tooth in each revolution of the sleeve. Gear 2I6 is integrally connected with a second gear 2I'I in driving relation with a gear 2I8 which rotates the sleeve 290 carrying hundreds cam I3 and contact disc 20 I. There is a stationary contact finger for each contact disc as indicated at 22I and 222, it being understood that there are twenty-four such contact fingers connected with the individual lights in section 36 and twenty-four contact fingers connected with the lights in section 31. These discs carry contacts appropriately arranged to energize the lights in different patterns to form the different numbers in sequence whereby the three monogra sections will count from 1 to 199 if the step-up solenoid 66 is energized 199 times.

As units shaft rotates from its nine position to its zero position the one tooth gear 29? effects rotation of sleeve 2 to its next position as from 0 to l, l to 2, etc. The one tooth gear 2 I functions in a similar manner to complete the number 100 upon the next operation of step-up solenoid 66 after the number 99.

To make the circuits through the monogram lights, the supply wire 88 is grounded on the frame 65' of the totalizing unit 65, and the contacts on the insulating discs 2I2 and 2I3 are all electrically grounded to this frame. Thus, the circuits to the individual lights are completed through wires such as the wire 239 leading from the finger 22!. Wire portion 89a is grounded on the frame of the other totalizer unit, not shown.

All the lights in the units section 36 have one terminal connected to a common Wire 23I, and

all the lights in the tens and hundreds sections 31 and 38 have one terminal connected to a common wire 232. The three cams II, I2 and I3 are provided with notches 235 for operating three sets of switches. Switches 24c, 2M, and 242 are all normally open switches in the zero position of shaft B, and these switches are closed simultaneously by movement of the notch 235 whenever the shaft B rotates out of its zero position. The switches 243, 244, and 245 operate in a similar manner under the control of cam I2. Similarly again the two switches 246 and 241 are closed by movement of the hundreds cam I3 out of its zero position.

Switches 240 and 24I are adapted when closed to connect wire 88 to both of wires 23I and 232. Wire portion 88a is similarly connected with the other totalizing unit, not shown. Switches 243 and 244 perform the same function. Switch 246 when closed connects wire 88 with wire 23I only. Switches 242, 245 and 241 all serve to connect wire I22 with supply wire 250.

Operation Assuming that the board has been cleared and the fight is ready to start, the timekeeper presses his round step-up switch button 24 on his timekeepers box 2e. This completes a circuit through wire I5, switch 24 and wire III to energize round step-up relay 5i, momentarily opening switch H8 and closing switch H9. The opening of switch I 18 at this time has no effect. The closing of switch II9 makes a circuit from supply wire 84 through switch II9, wire I 29, round step-up solenoid 6!, and back to supply wire I92, to produce a single stroke of armature I9I, actuating ratchet wheel I81 clockwise and moving contact arm I86 to its first position, energizing the first light in the display section 30 to indicate round 1. Relay 5i and solenoid 6| immediately return to their original positions as soon as push button switch 24 is released, the ratchet wheel I81 and switch arm I86 remaining, however, in their No. 1 position by the retaining action of the spring biased indexing lever I88 which permits the ratchet wheel to be advanced clockwise but prevents it from returning counterclockwise from its advanced positions.

After the first round has ended, the referee and judges award points to the contestants according to the scoring system in use by turning the knobs 25 on their respective control boxes 2!, 22 and 23. The mere setting of these switch knobs has no immediate effect on the system. After making his selection, each official presses his push button 21. Let it be assumed that the referee having the control box 2| is the first to make his selection and press his control button 21. The closing of this switch completes a circuit from supply wire 84, wire 95, switch 21, wire 94, wire 9I, referee relay 5%, wire 90, and normally closed switch 92 back to supply wire 83. The energization of relay 50 closes the three normally open switches I01, III and H2.

Switch IilI completes a circuit through wires I08, I96 and I 02 to energize the decision made indicating light 28 on the referees box. Switch H2 establishes a holding circuit for solenoid coil 59 through wire 93, normally closed switch 92, wire 99, wire 9!, wire 94, switch H2, wire II3, and normally closed switch IIB back to supply wire83, whereby release of push button 21 does not cause the relay 59 to reopen. Switch !II is one of three switches in series with the solenoid winding of lock relay 52, the other switches being manner of relay to close all three of the switches III, Illa and H52), thereby energizing .the solenoid coil of lock relay 52. Thus, lock relay 52 is likewise maintained energized after the release of push button switches 27.

The actuation of lock relay 52 closes normally open switches ifil and H5. Switch Iti completes a circuit from supply wire I832 through wire 98, switch arm 96, and one of the lights 3| corresponding to the selection of the referee. Similarly, one of the lights '32 is energized through a parallel circuit between wires 98a. and Iiiila controlled by scoring box 22, and one of the lights 33 is energized by a parallel circuit through wires 98b and met controlled by scoring box 23.

The closing of switch H5 establishes a circuit from supply wire 3&- through switch II5, wire H6, normally closed switch its, wire I37, count index solenoid 55, and wire lit to supply wire 83. Ihe energization of solenoid 56 withdraws the index arm llli from engagement with disc I 36 and simultaneously closes switch M2 to energize count motor 51 through wires ilfi, ill and switch I72. Shaft A then rotates disc lit, switch arms t lt and H15, and cam Hit. The operation of switch I'll by cam Id? at this time has no effect because of the normally open switch I28 in series circuit therewith.

As switch arm M5 sweeps the circle of contacts I50, it encounters, in succession, groups of contacts energized according to the positions of switch 'arms t! in the three control boxes 21, 22 and 23. When switch arm IE5 reaches such a group of energized contacts, the circuit through the switch arm is interrupted between contacts as the arm passes from one to the next to produce a series of electrical impulses in the circuit. The circuit thus controlled includes supply wire 16, switch arm 97, one of the contacts E54, and

one of the groups of contacts I52 to Isl, energized by the selection made on control box 2!. Similarly, other groups of contacts in the contact circle use are energized by the other two control boxes depending upon the selections made. Whenever the selection is E, no contacts in the circle I55 are energized because, as illustrated in the case of switch arm .fil', no circult is connected with the dead center contact All the contacts for scoring points for one contestant are located on one side of the circle l5d, and all the contacts for scoring points for the other contestant are located on the remaining half of the circle I50. Thus, as switch arm Hi5 rotates through its first half revolution, the total number of points awarded by all three officials to one contestant are represented in the first half of circle 50 as energized contacts which produce a corresponding number of electrical impulses in wire is! which is then connected through normally closed switch I3t with wire I38 leading to the step-up solenoid 68 in the totalizer unit 55 in Figure 3. This solenoid circuit is completed back to the source of supply through wire H. The armature of solenoid 66 is thereby actuated in succession a number of strokes equal to the total number of points awarded to the one contestant by all three .officials in the first round. Ratchet wheel 26% and shaft B; are, Stepped up 12 accordingly, establishing the proper circuits through units contact discs 2I2 and fingers 22I to energize the proper lights in units section 36 to form the desired number. As soon as this number exceeds nine, gears 258, 269 and 2) are operated by the single tooth gear 207 to rotate sleeve 2 one step and form a numeral 1 in the tens section 3?.

When switch arm I45 has rotated 180 degrees from its starting point, the totalizing of the points for the one contestant is completed and contact arm I44 then makes engagement with stationary contacts I48 and I59. A circuit is thereby completed from supply wire 84 through switch arm M4 to wire I32 and thence through the solenoid of alternator relay 54 back to supply wire 83. This operation opens switch I34 and closes switch I35 to transfer the pulse signal from wire I38 to wire I40 as switch arm I45 moves around the remainder of the circle of contacts I55. Wire I4!) is connected to the step-up solenoid of the other totalizer unit, not-shown, and the totalizing operation is then carried out on the monogram sections 39, 4!] and M for the other contestant.

The actuation of alternator relay 5:! also opens switch I38 to open the circuit of count index solenoid 56 and release index arm 114 to engage notch I'ZS at the end of 360 degrees of rotation. Armature I cannot move sufficiently'to open motor switch I'i2 until notch I13 presents itself under the index lever I14, and then the motor is deenergized and the disc I45 and contact arms I44 and I45 indexed in starting position. Switch I35 provides a holding circuit for alternatorrelay solenoid 5a through wires I31, switch I35, wire H6 and closed switch H5 back to supply wire 84, after the switch arm I44 has passed the contacts I48 and I49.

When round step-up switch button 24 is pressed again, round step-up solenoid tl is energized, as previously, to advance switch arm I one step and illuminate the next round number in display section 30. The actuation of round step-up relay 5I opens switch H8, thereby interrupting the previously described holding circuit for referee relay solenoid 50 through switch H8. When relay 5!) is thus deenergized, the opening of switch III deenergizes lock relay .52

which extinguishes all the lights in display sections 3|, 32 and 33 by opening switch IB I in the circuit of wire 98. The cumulative monogram display sections 34 and 35 are not disturbed and remain illuminated.

In succeeding rounds the "same operationsare repeated, with the totalizer units adding in the new points for each contestant in each round to show the accumulated totals of points'at all times in the display sections Hand 35.

The first actuation of step-up solenoid'fifi turns units cam 'II into switch closingposition, closing the switches 240, 2 1i and 242. The closing of switch 240 energizes wire E3i from supply wire 88, wire 23l being a common terminal or bus bar for the twenty-four lights in theLunitS section 36. Similarly, the closing of switch 2 H energizes wire 232 which is a common terminal for the remain ing lights. The closing of switch 242 connects supply wire 259 with wire I25. This has no effect on the system at this time in view of the open switch I21 in this circuit. The switches operated by cams i2 and 73 are in parallel with the switches just mentioned, andestablishparallel circuits to prevent deenergization-of .activeciraaeaaao cuits when units cam 'II passes its zero position at cumulative totals of 10, 20, 30, etc.

At the end of the fight, the whole board is cleared by merely pressing the timekeepers reset switch button 25. This action closes two circuits, one through wire I93 and another through wire I22. The circuit through wire I93 energizes round reset solenoid 62, drawing in its armature I89, closing normally open switch I95 and releasing index lever I38 from pawl wheel I81. Ratchet wheel I8! and switch arm I83 are spring returned counter-clockwise to starting or zero position, thereby extinguishing all the lights 33. If desired, the spring return mechanism may be arranged to return arm I86 to its round one position instead or a zero position. In return movement, the teeth of ratchet wheel I3! freely pass actuating lever I99. The closing of switch I95 establishes a holding circuit for solenoid 62 through wire I96 and normally closed switch I91 after push button 25 is released, to insure that indexing lever I88 will be held withdrawn until the ratchet wheel I81 and switch arm I 86 reach their zero position. When these parts reach zero position, pin I99 engages arm extension I98 to open switch I9! and deenergize solenoid 62. The round step-up unit is thus restored to its initial condition.

The circuit established by reset switch 25 through wire I22 energizes the solenoid of reset relay 53 to return both totalizer units to zero position. When the monogram lights show a total of ten points or more, both of switches 242 and 245 will be closed, holding a circuit from wire 259 through wire I25 and switch I21 to the solenoid of reset relay 53. The closing of relay 53 opens switch 92 and closes switches I26, I21 and I 28. The opening of switch 92 deenergizes referee relay 50, and also the two judge relays (not shown) by reason of similar connections. This operation, by reason of opening switch III, deenergizes lock relay 52 and extinguishes the lights in sections 3|, 32 and 33 by the opening of these light circuits at switch I I The opening of switch I I interrupts the holding circuit of alternator relay 54 through wires H6, closed switch l35 and wire I31, allowing this relay to resume its deenergized position illustrated.

The closing of switch I26 establishes a circuit through wire 93, switch I26, wire I29 and motor 57 to turn reset cam l4'I. Switch arms I44 and I45 are held stationary by the engagement of index I'l in the notch I13 of disc I48, the friction clutch I46 slipping to allow rotation of shaft A. The rotation of cam I4! closes and opens switch ill in quick succession, producing a pulse signal in a circuit through wire I30, closed switch I28, wire I 3! switch I IT, and wires I I8, I19 and I80 to actuate the reset solenoids in both totalizer units. The armature 263 of reset solenoid 51, for example, rotates ratchet wheel 23!, fixed on shaft B, in the reverse direction in step by stepmovement, until all the lights in monogram sections 34 and 35 are extinguished and all three cams ll, 12 and 13 have been turned back to their zero positions, as illustrated in Figure 3. When this condition is accomplished, it will be observed that the various switches operated by these cams are returned to their open circuit positions, as illustrated. When switches 242, 245 and 241 are all reopened, the circuit is broken between supply wire 253 and wire I25, deenergizing reset relay 53, stopping motor 51 by the open- 14 ing 01' switch I 26, and returning the whole system to its original condition.

Having now described our invention and in what manner the same may be used, what we claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. Scoring apparatus for a boxing match and the like having a plurality of judging ofiicials comprising an individual scoring device for each judging official, selector means in each of said scoring devices having a plurality of positions in a first range to award different numbers of points to one contestant and a plurality of positions in a second range to award different numbers of points to the other contestant, a score board, an individual number display section on said score board for each judging oilicial, each of said individual display sections having one portion to indicate the number of points awarded to one contestant in one round of the match and another portion to indicate the number of points awarded to the other contestant in one round of the match, a number display section on said score board to indicate the total number of points awarded to each contestant in all the completed rounds, and means for adding the numbers indicated in the corresponding portions of said judging ofiicials display sections after each round to numbers in the respective display sections for the two contestants.

2. In a boxing score board and the like, a plurality of scoring boxes, an individual number display section controlled by each of said scoring boxes, means requiring the operation of all of said scoring boxes to operate all of said individual display sections simultaneously as soon as all the scoring boxes have been operated, a totalizer unit for each contestant, cumulative total display sections for the contestants operated by the respective totalizer units to increase the total number of points for each contestant by the number of additionalpoints transmitted to said individual display sections by said scoring boxes, the operation of said individual display sections and totalizer units being initiated by the last of said plurality of scoring boxes to be operated in each round, a round number indicating display section, and a timekeepers control box having a single means to change the number of the round and remove th numbers displayed in all of said individual number display sections.

3. In a boxing score board and the like, individual number display sections for a plurality of judging officials, a cumulative total display section for each contestant, an individual scorin box for each judging ofiicial, means in said scoring boxes for selecting numbers to be displayed in the respective individual display sections, counting and totalizing means for adding points awarded to each contestant by said scoring box means to the numbers in said cumulative display sections, means requiring the operation of all of said scoring boxes for simultaneously operating all of said individual number display sections and .for initiating the operation of said counting and switch arm for imp rting a number of impuls to one of said totalizing units according to the number of contacts in said first series which are energized, a second series of contacts engaged by said switch arm to impart a series of impulses'to the other totalizing unit according to the number of contacts which are energized in said second series, a plurality of scoring boxes each having a selector switch with a first range of position to award different numbers of points to one contestant and a second range of positions to award different numbers of points to the other contestant, contacts in each scoring box in said first range of positions each contact being connected to energize a different number of contacts in said first series of contacts, contacts in each scoring box in said second range of positions each contact being connected to energize a different number of con tacts in said second series of contacts engaged by said rotating switch arm, one revolution of said switch arm actuating both of said totalizer units to add together all the points awarded to each contestant on all the scoring boxes.

5. Scoring apparatus for a boxing match and the like having a plurality of judging officials comprising an individual scoring devicefor each judging oincial, selector means in each of said scoring devices having a plurality of positions .in afirst range to award diiferent numbers of points to one contestant and a plurality of positions in a second range to award diiierent numbers of points to the other contestant, a score board, an individual number display section on said score board for each judging ofiicial, each of said individual display sections having available in one portion a plurality of numbers to indicate points awarded to one contestant in one round of the match and having available in another portion a plurality of numbers to indicate points awarded to the other contestant in the same round, a cumulative total display section for each contestant, a totalizer unit for each contestant controlling said last display sections, respectively, and means requiring the operation of all of said scoring devices to transmit the numbers of points awarded in said selector devices to said individual number display sections and said totalizer units when all the scoring devices have been operated.

6. Scoring apparatus for a boxing match and the like having a plurality of judging Qificials comprising an individual scoring device for each judging official, selector means in each of said scoring devices havin a plurality of positions in a first range to ward different num ers of point to one contestant and a plurality of positions in second range to award different numbers of points to the other contestanna score board, .an

individual number isplay secti n on said score board for each judging oincial, each of said indi vidual display sections having available in 1011s to the other contestant in the same round, a

cumulative total display secti n 101' ea h com testant, a totalizer unit for each contestant con.- trolling said last display sections, respectively, means requiring the operation of all of said scoring devices to transmit the numbers of points awarded in said selector devices to said individual number display sections and said totalizer units when all the scoring devices have been operated, a display section on said score board to indicate the number of the round, a timekeepers control device, and a manipulable member in said timekeepers control device to change the number of the round and remove the numbers displayed in said individual judges display sections.

7. Scoring apparatus for a boxing match and the like having a plurality of judging officials comprising an individual scoring device for each judging ofiicial, selector means in each of said scoring devices having a plurality of positions in a first range to award different numbers of po nts to one contestant and a plurality of positions in a second range to award different numbers of points to the other contestant, a score board, an individual number display section on said score board for each judging ofiicial, each of said individual display sections having available in one portion a plurality of numbers to indicate points awarded to one contestant in one round of the match and having available in another portion a plurality of numbers to indicate points awarded to the other contestant the same round, a cumulative total display section for each contestant, a display section to indicate the number of the round, means fortransmitting the numbers of points awarded to the contestants on said scoring devices to the respective judges display fi tions, means for adding the nu bers of points awarded by all the judges to the respective cumulative total display sections for each con.- testant, means requiring the operation of all of said scoring devices to initiate the operation of said transmitting means and adding means, and a. timekeepers control device operable to change the number of the round and removethe numbers'displayed in said judges display sections.

MICHAEL ,J. .MESI. RAYMOND G. DAVIS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PA'IENTIS

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US3149841 *Oct 13, 1958Sep 22, 1964Hullman Julius FGame illustrating unit
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Classifications
U.S. Classification377/5, 235/144.00E, 235/132.00R, 340/323.00R, 235/144.00M
International ClassificationA63B71/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63B71/06
European ClassificationA63B71/06