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Publication numberUS2669611 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1954
Filing dateJul 22, 1950
Priority dateJul 22, 1950
Publication numberUS 2669611 A, US 2669611A, US-A-2669611, US2669611 A, US2669611A
InventorsSilvius Walter P
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical control switch
US 2669611 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16, 1954 w. P. SILVIUS 2,569,611

I ELECTRICAL CONTROL SWITCH Filed July 22. 1950 Insulation l I Insulation 7 INVENTQR Walter P. SHwus.

ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 16, 1954 2,669,611 ELECTRICAL CONTROL SWITCH Walter P. Silvius, Murrysville, Pa., assignor to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application July 22, 1950, Serial No. 175,408

5 Claims.

This invention relates to electric switches and more particularly to switches which are operable for controlling a plurality of circuits.

An object of this invention is the provision of a rotary switch construction which effectively and reliably combines rotary and push-pull movements and is thoroughly satisfactory for controlling various electrical circuits.

Another object of the present invention is that of providing a unitary switch construction capahle of push-pull operation from an intermediate neutral position and capable of rotary movement in opposite directions from the neutral position, for achieving switching functions.

A further object is to provide a switch construction of the character indicated above, having a highly useful biasing arrangement for resiliently biasing the switch to intermediate neural position both with respect to rotation and push-pull operation.

Another object or" this invention is the provision of a switch construction of the character indicated above which includes a novel arrangement of contact members to secure selective control of a pair of electrical circuits depending upon the direction of rotation from neutral position and selective control of another pair of circuits depending upon push-pull operation from neutral position.

A still further object is to provide a switch of the above character in which change from any one of the switching functions to another of the switching functions introduces operation through neutra1 position.

The above and other objects and novel features of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter from the following detailed description where taken in connection with the accompanying drawing. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawing is utilized for purposes of illustration only and is not to be taken as a definition of the limits of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

In the drawing, wherein similar reference characters denote similar parts throughout the several views:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a rotary push-pull switch embodying the principles of the present invention; and

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially along the line IIII in Fig. 1.

In the embodiment of this invention represented in the accompanying drawing, it will be seen that a multi-way electrical switch I0 is provided having a support as in the form of a casing generally indicated at the reference numeral l. The casing comprises a base |2 made of an insulating material such as phenolic resin, fiber or fiber filled with resin such as of the phenolic type. Affixed to the base I2 are a plurality of terminals in pairs, including the terminals l3, l4, I5, IS, IT, |8, i9 and 26 for connection into electrical circuits which are to be controlled by the multi-way switch l0. These terminals conveniently are bolts made of electrically conductive material, such as copper or an electrically conductive alloy, and extend through openings in separate rows along the length of the base I2 and are held to this base by suitable nuts on their outside ends. Terminals l9 and 20 (see Fig. 2) are in different ones of these rows and are laterally opposite each other on the base I2 to constitute a pair, as are terminals I3 and I4, terminals l5 and I6, and terminals l7 and I8. The switch casing further includes a front wall 2| having an inturned flange fastened to the base l2 as by machine screws 22, and a back wall 23 which also has an inturned flange fixed to the base, also for example by means of machine screws 24. Side walls 25 and 26 of the casing conveniently seat in grooves in the base l2 and are closed off at the top by suitable flanges of a cover 21, the latter forming a closure of the casing and conveniently being held in place by machine screws 49 engaging inturned flanges at the upper ends of the front and back walls 2| and 23. Cover 27 preferably has a lining 28 of insulating material, as for example of the same composition as the base l2.

Front wall 2| and back wall 23, respectively, include substantially centrally disposed bushings 29 and 30 which, for example, are received in openings in these walls, and may be firmly secured to the same, as by press fit or the like. If desired, the bushings and main body portions may be made integral as by punching and stamping the walls 2| and 23 from sheet metal. The bushings 29 and 30 support a switching member or rotor 3| so that this member may not only be rotated but longitudinally moved as by sliding relative thereto. The switching member 3| preferably comprises a shaft 32 which includes a metallic core 34 (see Fig. 2) and a tube 35 of insulating material such as phenolic resin or the like covering and secured to the part of the core which carries the contacts. One end of shaft core 34 extends through bushing 29 and, for example, through a spacer plate 36 and panel ing member 3|. The opposite end of shaft 32 has,

a demountable extension including a machine screw 39 threadedly engagingthe core portion 34 of the main body portion of the shaft, and

a sleeve 33 received on the screw'and passing through bushing 30 for supporting this end of:

the shaft. Sleeve 33 is interposed between the head of screw 39 and the adjacent end-of shaft core 34.

Asshown, the switching member 3i further includesswitch contact members 35, ll, 32 and zd spaced. along. the, shaft. The switch contact members. ;40tand d|' preferably are annular cupshaped-ielements havingcentrally perforated bottomsv for receiving the shaft32, and, for example, openaway'from each other toward cam discs 44- and 45, respectively, adjacent thereto, both of thexdiscshaving substantially central openings receiving-the shaft 32. A plurality of spacer sleeves arev alsoon the shaft 32, among these being-insulatingsleeves 46 and M, respectively, betweencontact members 45 and ii and'the contact: members 52 and 43, for maintaining these memberselectrically separate. Immediately forward of the contact member 33 and on the shaft is.:aninsulating. spacer sleeve 43 which abuts this contactzmember anda forward support 58 for a double-acting. helical spring the support,.for;.example, being substantially in the shape of' a;spool,-.having. a central bore admitting the shaft132 andhaving opposite end flanges 52 and 5:3; Flange 53 of the spring support, illustratively haszaradiallbore into shaft 32 so as to receive a". pin 55' giving interconnection of the support 5ll1and insulating tube 35 with the core 3.41 Aisoion the shaft 323 in the present instance are spacer. sleeves 55, 55, 51 and 58, these and the, spacer; sleeves ifi, 41 and 43 all, for example, being, made of phenolic resin, fiber, or the like. Sleeves 5'5: and fit'abut-opposite facesof camdiso ia'i and, respectively, extend to abut- 'ment against contact members 3! and 32. Spacer sleeve.56'is'disposedbetween camdisc id and contact '40.: The sleeve 55 is betweencarn disc 44 and sleeve 33. Sleeve 33 illustratively has a central longitudinal borev receiving the shank of machine screw 39 and includes a flange til at the, forward end thereof abutting the spacer sleeve 55. The outer end of sleeve 33 is reduced in section where it passes through bushing 35 to form a stop shoulder 53. Tightening of the machinescrew 39 into the core 34 ofthe main body portionof the shaft 32 forces the shaft sleeve 33;longitudinally and forces flange 6| thereof against the spacer sleeve 55. Likewise, tighteningof the machine screw 39 forces spacer element-48 against the spring support 513, and the inbetween elements including contact members 40, M, 42 and d3, cam discs ld and 55 and spacer elementslid, d1, 55, 5'! and 58 accordingly are urged and held together in-assembled relation.

Longitudinal movementof the switching member 3| byinward push on the operating handle 3 81, is limited by the, shoulder 60. of the sleeve- 33 cooperating with the adjacent inner face of bushing-'30 to afford a stop. Likewise, longitudinal movement of the switching member 3| by outward pull on the operating handle is efiectively limited by means of a shoulder t l disposed on shaft 32 in advance of the spring support 50. The outer end of this shoulder 5d cooperates with the adjacent inner face of bushing 29.130 afford a stop against the outward pull.

The switching member 3! is held to a neutral longitudinal position by helical biasing springs 55 and 55, and may be pushed or pulled from this position to achieve certain switching operations as will be more fully described hereinafter. Spring ESE-is disposed on shaft 32 and is cornpressed between the forward end of spring support 55 and the inner face of the front wall 2| of the switch casing. The helical spring 35 is also on'the shaft 32, but extends between the rearmost face of the flange 5! on sleeve 35 to the forward or inner face of the rear wall 23 of the switch casing. The springs 65 and 55 act against each other across the switching member 3i to bias the same to the neutral longitudinal position represented in Fig. i. In the latter position of the switching. member til it will be observed-that shoulders 65 and 5% on the outer ends of shaft 32 are some distance away from the corresponding rear wall 25 and the corresponding-front wall 2! of the switch casing, so as to allow push or pull of the switching member prior to eifecting a stopping action against the respective walls.

Switch terminals 13 and i l on the base 52 of the switch casing are individually connected with resilient contact fingers i0 and ii forming a normally open set which, for example, extend upwardly respectively from affixation from between the-heads of the terminal bolts and base l2 to positions on opposite sides of the contact member 43 on shaft 32. The upper ends of these resilient fingers preferably are substantially V- shaped incross section so as to respond to camming action of the cam disc 45 when the latter is longitudinally moved. In the position of the switch 10 represented in Fig. l, the V-shaped ends of the resilient fingers conveniently rest in an annular groove 55a in the surface of the camming disc Ml, and this disc in being made of insulating material interposes a non-conductive space between the finger ends, thusmaintaining open circuit across the terminals 53 and id.

Switch terminals i5 and it also have a normally open set of resilient switch contact fingers extending upwardly therefrom, these being fingers Hand 53 similar to fingers if! and Ti and each preferably having a substantially V-shaped cross section at the upper ends for seating in an annular groove 4 511 in the cam disc 35 from opposite sides of. the latter. The fingers l2 and I3 individually correspond to the terminals. l5 and i5, and the camdisc 35 in being made of an insulating material is elfective for separating the ends of the fingers thereon against conducting current across the related terminals when the switch it is in the intermediate neutral position represented in Fig. 1. r

A push inwardly of the handle 33 from the position indicated in Fig. 1, however, displaces the cam disc t5 longitudinallyfrom between the contactfingers: "it and H and brings the contact member 53 to the in-between position. The fingers l5 and ii being resilient and sprung in favor of movingtoward each other at their upper free ends, move into-electrical. connection withcontact member 40 interposed by the longitudinal movement, and thus complete connection across the terminals i3 and M. The inward movement of the switching member 3| for achieving the latter connection fails to displace the cam disc 45 so far as to free the contact fingers l2 and 13 from the insulating effect at thi point. Release of the operating handle 38 allows the biasing springs 65 to return the switching member to the neutral longitudinal position. A pull outwardly on the switch operating handle causes longitudinal movement of the cam disc 45 in a forward direction from between the resilient contact fingers 12 and 13, which are sprung in favor of advancing toward each other at their free upper ends until engaging contact member 4| which now occupies the in-between position. This engagement closes connection across the terminals i5 and iii. The forward movement of the switching member from neutral position is insuflicient to displace the cam disc 44 from between resilient contact members 70 and 7| and thus open circuit conditions prevail at this point. Release of the operating handle 38 at the outer position allows biasing spring 68 to return the switching member 3| to the neutral longitudinal position represented in Fig. l, the cam discs 44 and 45 then both being effective for separating the related pairs of switch fingers adjacent thereto and accordingly maintain open circuit conditions across the terminals I3 and I4 and terminals iii and It. The neutral position is defined by grooves Ma and 45a in the cam discs receiving their respective contacts, to thus act as indexing means for defining the longitudinal neutral position.

The spaced switch contact members 42 and 43 rotate bodily with the switching member 3| by means of rotation of the operating handle 38. These contact members, for example, each have diametrically opposite arms radiating from a central hub portion thereof which receives the shaft 32. On the contact member 42 these arms turn in at their outer ends to form diametrically opposed contacts 42a and 42b individually corresponding to a normally open set of resilient contact fingers l4 and extending upwardly respectively from connection with terminals l and I8 at opposite sides of the switching member 3|. Likewise, the contact arms of contact member 43 turn in to afford contacts 43a and 43b which are diametrically opposed to each other and individually correspond to a normally open set of resilient contact fingers 16 and '11 extending upwardly from connection with th respective terminals I9 and 20 at opposite sides of the switching member 3i. As shown, contact members 42 and 43 from member to member have their arms and the contacts at the ends thereof about 60 removed from each other in terms of rotation on shaft 32. This angular relation is convenient- 1y maintained by an insulating key 18 (see Fig. 2) between the sleeve of the shaft 32 and the hubs of the contacts 42 and 43 on the shaft tube. This key also extends between the spring support 53, and other contacts 40, 45, and the tubular portion 35 of the shaft to prevent relative rotation of these elements.

The helical spring 5| on support 50 is effective for biasing the switching member 3| to a neutral intermediate position of rotation. In this, for example, flanges 52 and 53 of the spring support to have lateral extensions 52a and 53a disposed adjacent to a pin 8!! fast at one end to the casing front wall 2|. Respective ends of the helical spring 66 extend across outside surfaces of the lateral extensions 52a and 53a and straddle the pin 80, thus to render this spring doubleacting for returning the switching member 3| to an intermediate position of rotation regardless of the direction of rotation of the handle 38. With this arrangement for example, it is possible to rotate the switch handle 38 and accordingly the switching member 3|, from an intermediate neutral position of rotation wherein contacts 42a and 42b of the contact member 42 remain disengaged from fingers l4 and i5 and wherein the contacts 43a and 43b of contact member 43 remain disengaged from fingers 16 and TI, to a position angularly removed in one direction of rotation for connecting the circuit across the terminals l1 and I8, or in the opposite direction to a position angularly removed from neutral to close the circuit across switch terminals I9 and 20.

The rotation of contacts 42 and 43 preferably is achieved only when neutral longitudinal position of the switching member 3| prevails. For preventing rotation of the switching member at other than neutral longitudinal position, flange 52 of the spring support 50 conveniently includes an arcuate lip 52b in which a notch or groove 520 is sufiiciently large to receive and somewhat clear the pin 80, thus giving guided longitudinal movement of the switching member 3| along the pin when the notch or groove and pin are in alignment but stopping rotation of the switching member. The biasing springs 65 and 85, however, in being effective for urging the switching mem ber 3| to intermediate neutral longitudinal position also conveniently serve to bring flange 52b to alignment with a groove or notch a in the pin 80 in the latter position, so that the switching member may be rotated in the appropriate one of opposite directions for selectively closing circuit across terminals l1 and |8 or across terminals I9 and 20. In this, clockwise rotation of the switching member 3| as viewed in Fig. 2, serves to bring contacts 43a and 43b, respectively, into engagement with the resilient fingers I1 and 16 and thus the contact member 43 occupies closed circuit position relative to terminals I9 and 20. Contact member 42 remains clear of fingers 14 and T5 in this position and accordingly occupies open circuit position relative to terminals I! and I8. At neutral position of rotation, the contact members 42 and 43 both are clear of the corresponding resilient contact fingers 72,. 13, 14 and 15, and terminals and I8 and terminals l9 and 20 thus are disconnected. A counterclockwise rotation of the switching member 3| as viewed in Fig. 2, brings contacts 42a and 42b, respectively, into engagement with the contact fingers l4 and I5 and in this manner the contact member 42 occupies closed circuit position relative to terminals [5 and I6. Contact member 43 remains clear of fingers l6 and TI in this position, thus leaving the terminals l3 and 20 disconnected.

It will also be seen that the switching member 3| is effectively stopped against longitudinal movement from the intermediate longitudinal position thereof, by pin 89 and flange 5222, when the switching member is rotated from the intermediate neutral position of rotation and the notch or groove 520 is out of alignment with the pin. The double-acting helical spring 5|, however, is conveniently eifective not only for urging neutral intermediate position of rotation of the switching member 3|, but for aligning notch or groove 520 with pin 80. so that longitudinal movemen't may behad'from the intermediate neutral position of rotation; A pull exerted' on: the operating handle 38 under the latter conditions displaces the'switchingmember to position where insulating cam disc 45 moves clear: of the re.- silient fingers l2 and Ii-land contact il" advances to between these fingers thus completing connection across terminals 15 and 16. At this point insulating cam disc 44 still separates fingersl and H, and rotary contacts 42 and: 43 remain clear of engaging; therespective fingers IL-and 15'and=fingers 16 and l"l. Release of the oper'ating'handleallows return ofswitchinglmemher 3 lto neutrallongitudinalposition, this under the bias of spring 66. At neutral longitudinal position, insulating. cam discs ll and 45 maintain open circuit conditions respectively between fingers I0 and H and fingers 12- and T3, and rotary contact members 42 and t3 are in open circuit positions, respectively; relative to fingers i1 and I8 and'fingers l9 and 20a A push executed on the operating handle 38 moves the switching member longitudinally from interme diate longitudinal and rotary position, which moves insulating cam disc 44- irom" between: resilient fingers'lll and H, and moves contact in to'between the latter for connecting terminals [3 and I4". Insulating cam disc 45 meanwhile separates fingers 12 and 15,. and" rotary contacts 42 and 43,. respectively remain clear of fingers M and i and fingers It and 'H- for open circuit conditions at these points.

Thus it will be seen that in accordance with the presentinvention,theswitch whats a switching member 31 which not only is operable: inopposite' longitudinal directions from a neutral longitudinal position for selectively achieving switching functions',. but is operable by rotation from a neutral position of rotation for selecting other switching functions. It-will also be seen that the switching member 31 of the switch is effectively biased. for regaining a neutral positionwhich is intermediate the ranges of longitudinal androtary movements and from which neutral position any of the switching functions mentioned may readily be initiated. Of stillfurther importance, it will benoted thatthe switch Ill introduces movement through the neutral position being operated to achieve" the' different switching functions, thus afiording protection to the working parts of the switch and to the related circuits-andapparatusin the circuitswhich the switch may be used to control;

While one embodiment of' the invention has been shown and described herein with considerable particularity, it will readily be understood by those skilled in the art that various modifications may' be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the'invention. Reference will, therefore, be had to the appended claims for a definition of the limits of the invention.

1 claim as my invention:

1. A switch comprising, a support, contacts mounted onsaid support, contact actuating means mounted for rotatable and longitudinal movement'onsa-id support and biased to normally occupy a neutral position intermediate the ex tremesof its longitudinal and rotative positions on the support, said contact actuating means having meansfor closing" diner-cut circuits through said contacts in accordance with movement-lin opposite directions of rotation from said neutral position and. opposite directions longt- 'tudina"lly from said neutralposition',. respectively, notched 1cm: means -secured' to the supl rr,- and notched flange-meansfsecured to the contact astuating means,.said notched: pin means and said notched flange means cooperatingto so control the movement of the contact actuating means that the contact actuating means must pass through saidneutrai position when changing betweenrotational and. longitudinal movement.

2: A switch comprising, a support, contacts mounted on said support, contact actuating means mounted for rotatable and longitudinal movement on said support and biased to normally occupy a neutral position at intermediate longitudinal and rctative positions, said contact actuating. means having means for closing circuits-selectively through'said contacts in accordance'witlr movement selected from opposite directions ofrotation from said neutral position and opposite directions longitudinally from said neutral position, notched pin means secured to said support and notched flange means secured tosaidcontact actuating means, said notched pin meansand.said notched flange means cooperating torequire the contact actuating means to pass through said neutral position when changing between rotational and longitudinal movement.

3. A unitary switch construction: comprising, a support having four separate contact means thereon, a switching member mounted on said support for longitudinal adjustment in opposite directions from an intermediate neutral longitudinal position and for rotation in opposite directions from intermediate neutral longitudinal position, means carried by said switching member for selectively closing the circuit to said contact means, respectively, upon longitudinal movement of said switching member in said oppositedirections from the intermediate neutral longitudinal position and upon rotation of said switching member in said opposite directions, respectively, notched pin means secured to the support, and notched flange means secured to the switching member, said notched pin means and said notched flange means cooperating to so control the movement of the'swltching member that the switching member must pass through said neutral position when changing between rotational and longitudinal movement.

4. A unitary switch construction comprising,a support, contact elements mounted in normally open pairs along said support, a switching member mounted. on said support and extending between the' elements of each pair of said contacts for longitudinal adjustment in opposite directions from an intermediate neutral longitudinal position and for rotation in opposite directions from said intermediate neutral longitudinal position, a plurality of contacts carried by said switching member for selectively bridging the elements in a different one of said pairs of elements upon longitudinal movement of said switching. member in said opposite directions from the intermediate neutral longitudinal position and upon rotation of said switching member in the opposite directions from said neutral position, respectively, notched pin and notched flange means for stopping said switching member against rotation other. than in substantially said intermediate neutral longitudinal position thereof and for stopping said. switching member against longitudinal movement other: than in said neutral position, and resilient means cooperating-.withsaid' stop means to yieldingly oppose rotational movement of the switching 5. A unitary switch construction comprising, a support, contact means mounted on said support, a switching member mounted on said support for longitudinal adjustment in opposite directions from an intermediate neutral longitudinal position and for rotation from said intermediate neutral longitudinal position, resilient means for normally maintaining the switching member in said neutral longitudinal position, means carried by said switching member for selectively actuating said contacts upon longitudinal movement of said switching member in either of said opposite directions from the intermediate neutral longitudinal position and upon rotation of said switching member from said intermediate neutral position thereof, notched pin and notched flange means for stopping said switching member against rotation other than substantially in said intermediate neutral position thereof, and

iii

WALTER P. SILVIUS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,806,331 Simmen May 26, 1931 1,878,692 Ringbloom Sept. 20, 1932 2,103,792 Peterson Dec. 28, 1937 2,305,185 Merkel Dec. 15, 1942 2,451,224 Johnson Oct. 12, 1948 2,590,615 Silvius Mar. 25, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 450,043 Great Britain July 9, 1936

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2748204 *Oct 23, 1952May 29, 1956Westinghouse Air Brake CoCircuit controllers
US2786904 *May 13, 1954Mar 26, 1957Gen Railway Signal CoControl switch for railway traffic controlling systems
US3047683 *Mar 22, 1961Jul 31, 1962Shlesinger Jr Bernard EdwardMultiple contact switch
US3120585 *Dec 9, 1958Feb 4, 1964Teleregister CorpRotary switch with replaceable contact sets
US3207860 *Dec 13, 1962Sep 21, 1965Tri TechSwitch actuating mechanism with overtravel transmitting motion means
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Classifications
U.S. Classification200/4, 200/17.00R, 200/564
International ClassificationH01H25/00, H01H25/06
Cooperative ClassificationH01H25/06
European ClassificationH01H25/06