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Publication numberUS2669736 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1954
Filing dateMay 26, 1950
Priority dateMay 26, 1950
Publication numberUS 2669736 A, US 2669736A, US-A-2669736, US2669736 A, US2669736A
InventorsWabnitz George H
Original AssigneeWabnitz George H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint tray for roller applicators
US 2669736 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1954 G. H. WABNITZ PAINT TRAY FOR ROLLER APPLICATORS Filed May 26. 1950 INVENTOR. GEORGE H. WABN/ T Z ATTORNEY i Patented Feb. 23, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 6 Claims.

The present invention relates to trays for supplying paint to a roller-type paint applicator.

Roller-type paint applicators are coming more and more into use, particularly for applying paint to interior walls. They are easy to manipulate and with them a flat surface can be painted more rapidly than with a paint brush.

One drawback of the roller-type applicator heretofore has been the lack of a satisfactory means for putting paint on the applicator itself. Trays are supplied for this purpose, but the conventional type of tray is just a shallow receptacle adapted to contain only a small amount of paint, and has to be refilled repeatedly even for a small paint job. Moreover, when using the conven tional type of tray, it is difficult to distribute the paint evenly around the whole circumference of the applicator. To pick up paint on an applicator it is necessary to roll the applicator back and forth several times along the bottom of the tray. This not only is bothersome and irksome, but slows up the painting job. Furthermore, with a conventional tray, especially when the tray has been freshly filled, the paint flows not only onto the periphery of the applicator but around the ends of the applicator. The paint on the ends of the roller is likely to drip which is an annoyance and an inconvenience; and moreover, it gets into the bearings of the roller, clogging the bearings.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a tray for use in applying paint to a roller-type paint applicator which will permit complete saturation of the roller with paint more rapidly than is possible with any prior type of tray used for this purpose.

Another object of the invention is to provide a tray for use in applying paint to roller-type applicators which is so constructed that the paint can be applied to the applicator without working or rolling the roller in the tray.

A further object of the invention is to provide a tray for applying paint to a roller-type applicator which is so constructed that the paint will not get onto the ends of the roller or into the bearings of the roller.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a tray for applying paint to a rollertype applicator which can carry a much larger supply of paint than any conventional type tray used for the purpose.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the appended claims.

In the drawing:

Fig. l is a plan view of a tray built according to one embodiment of this invention, the roller being shown in the tray in dotted lines;

Fig. 2 is a transverse section through the tray;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of the tray and also showing diagrammatically how the tray may be held in use by the painter; and

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but showing the tray tipped to apply the paint to an applicator.

The tray of this invention may be made of sheet metal, plastic, or any other suitable material. The tray comprises a container H], a reservoir section II, and a trough portion It.

The container is approximately cylindrical in shape and is, in use, closed at both ends. Its front wall, denoted at l5 (Fig. 3), is formed by bending the bottom M of the tray around upon itself. There is a space it left between the rolled-over portion l 5 of the tray and the bottom M of the tray, to provide a mouth or port through which paint may flow out of the container ill into the reservoir II.

The trough l2 of the tray comprises a base portion l8, which is part of the bottom M of the tray, and the tWo parallel side walls I9. It has a lip 26 at its forward end which acts to retain the paint in the trough. The side walls iii are bent inwardly toward one another, to form rear walls for the trough portion, and then are bent at right angles again to form the parallel side Walls 23 of the reservoir II. The rear walls of the trough consist of the rounded lower portions 2| and the upstanding portions 22. The rounded lower portions 21 have approximately the same radius of curvature as the applicator with which the tray is to be used.

Between the side walls or wings 23 of the reservoir ll, there is provided an arcuate-shaped bafile 25 which is approximately twice as high as the space l6 which forms the port for the container Ill. The baffle 25 extends approximately for only half the extent of the arcuate portions 2| of the rear walls of the trough.

The container It is closed at one end by an integral end wall, denoted at 21, this closed end wall 21 being formed as an extension of one side wall 23 of the reservoir. The other end of the container Ill is closed by a removable cap 29. The container Ill may be made large enough to hold a quart, a half gallon, a gallon, or even more paint.

The bottom M of the tray forms the bottom of the reservoir II, but this reservoir, like trough I2, is open at its top. It is filled from the con- 3 tainer ID by paint flowing out of container l through slot It.

For filling, the container I0 is tipped on end, so that the container I0 is at the bottom, and paint is poured into the top of the reservoir H between the bafiie plate 25 and front wall of the container until the container is filled. The cap 29 is provided simply to permit cleaning out the container 10 at any time after use.

In using the tray; the painter carries it on his forearm A, gripping it in his hand by inserting his fingers through the grip 38 which is welded or otherwise secured to the bottom of the tray.

In operation, the roller R isr-held close to the baiile plate 25 by its handle H. By means of a slight downward motion of the arm the-operator spills paint over the roller, and with a. slight drawing motion of the roller over the bottom of the trough the paint is equally distributed over the roller while on the way to the surface of application. When. the. roller is returnedto the. tray for another immersion, it is rolled. toward the baffle plate, picking up any paint left from the previou dip, and squeezingit into-the reservoir. When the roller abuts against the curved rear walls 2 i and bafllle portion 25, of. the trough, the painter tips the trayslightly, as before and as shown in Fig. 4, to allow the paint in the reservoir I i to spill over the top of the loafiile 25' onto the periphery of theroller R. The trough is long enough to permit the roller R to make substantially a complete-revolution as it is rolled over the bottom portion 18 of the. trough from the lip 25) to the rear. walls H. The paint spilling over the baffle 25, when the tray is tilted, insures complete coverage and complete saturation of the roller in'one traverse of the roller over the trough.

The feature of immersing, the roller from its top by spilling paint over the top of the roller, allows the paint to go. down over the. roller giving complete saturation of the material of the roller. without working or rolling the roller back. and, forth in the tray. After one roll of the roller across the bottom of the tray, the roller ma.- terial is saturated; and the roller It) may be applied. to a wall to paintthe wall.

The distance between the wall-s 23 of the reservoir is always made less than the length of the roller R with which the tray is to be used. Hence, the channel or spillway over the top of the baffle 25 is centered between the ends of the roller so that the ends of the; roller. are protected. from the paint flow, thereby keeping them free from paint, eliminating dripping and clogging of the bearings.

The top of the baffle 25, as already stated, is at approximately half. the height. of the; roller R. The reservoir opening it is approximately half. the height of the baffle plate 25'. This allows the paint to feed out of the container into the reservoir sufficiently to fill the reservoir to practically the top of the baffle. The container, when filled, keeps a supply of paint at this level. The container, being sealed tight, forms a vacuum preventing the paint from running out of the container.

The present invention provides, therefore, a-

handy, convenient tray for quickly saturating a roller applicator with paint. Moreover, the tray can carry sufficient paint for a whole room without refilling.

With a tray constructed according to the present: invention, a roller applicator can be.- left in the'channel formed.- by the. curved portion 2:!" of.

the; rear walls of the trough; and, the baffle 25 overnight, thoroughly saturated, so long as the trough is covered with a suitable lid. The roller applicator will be in perfect condition for use the next morning.

Obviously the size of the container, and various dimensions of the tray can be altered to suit the size of the applicator or applicators with which the tray is to be used.

The term paint, as used herein, is employed in a generic sense, and. is intended. to: include lacquers, varnishes and other similar materials, as well as ordinary paints.

While the invention has been described in connection with a particular embodiment thereof, it will be understood that the invention is capable of further modification, and this application is intended-to cover any variations, uses, or adaptation of the invention, following, in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within known. or customary practice: in the: art to which the invention pertains and; as: may be: applied to the essential features hereinbefore) set forth and as fall within the scope of the: invent-- tion or the limits of the appended: claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I.

claim is:

l. A paint tray for usev with: roller-type paint applicators comprising a; receptacle having a roller-type applicator is: rolled to" pickup. paint. the height of said partition being greater; au a. cent the side walls of the receptacle thanv in its central portion, saidcentral portion constituting: a bafileover the topof whichzpaint may be spilledi from said reservoir onto the roller applicatorwhen said applicator is abutting against. said;

partition, said front wall being of approximately the same height as the central portion: of; said:

partition, said side walls decreasing in. heightv from. said partition to said front. wall,. and said;

partition wall having a concavearcuately curved;

front face in the portion of it which is-adjacent.

the bottom of the receptaclev to. receive the periphery of a roller applicator when; said: appli-- cator is abutting; against said partition wall and a hand grip secured to the outsidesurfaceof thebottom Wall of thereceptacle beneath! said bottom wall, whereby the traymay rest. on-theforearm of a painter and be held: by the painters hand.

2.. A paint tray for. use with. roller=typepaint l applicators, having a: bottom wall, sidewalls; a front wall, and a transverse partition extending between the side. walls intermediate thErGlldfiOf the side walls, said partition dividing: the tray into a trough, which liesforward: of the parti; tion', and a reservoir, which lies-rearward; of the partition, 2. container mounted. atthe rear: ofiz-li' the tray, the front of which. forms; the: rearwal'l of the reservoir, said container having; a' slot. in: 5 it directly above the: bottom of? the tray? through which paint. may flow from the container intoz'n the reservoir, the top of said slot. beingzhelowthe.

minimum height of: the. partition, wl'rerehypaint may be retained behind the partition betweem the partition and the front of the container...

3. A paint tray for use with roller-types paint applicators, having abottom wall, side walls-,, a

front wall, and a transverse partition extending between the side walls intermediate the ends of the side walls, said partition dividing the tray into a trough, which lies forward of the partition, and a reservoir, which lies rearward of the partition, a container mounted at the rear of the tray, the front of which forms the rear wall of the reservoir, said container having a slot in it directly above the bottom of the tray through which paint may flow from the container into the reservoir, the top of said slot being below the minimum height of the partition, whereby paint may be retained behind the partition between the partition and the front of the con tainer, said partition being arcuately curved in the portion of it which is adjacent the bottom of the tray to receive the periphery of a roller applicator.

4. A paint tray for use with roller-type applicators, having a bottom wall, side walls, a front wall, and a transverse partition extending between the side walls intermediate the ends of the side walls, said partition dividing the tray into a trough, which lies forward of the partition, and a reservoir, which lies rearward of the partition, said partition being of greater height adjacent the side walls of the receptacle than in its central portion, said central portion constituting a bafiie over the top of which paint may be spilled from the reservoir onto a roller applicator disposed in the trough against the partition, a container mounted at the rear of the tray, the front of which forms the rear wall of the reservoir, said container having a slot in it directly above the bottom of the tray through which paint may flow from the container into the reservoir, the top of said slot being below the top of the central portion of the partition, whereby paint may be retained behind the partition between the partition and the front of the container.

5. A paint tray for use with roller-type applicators, having a bottom wall, side walls, a front wall, and a transverse partition extending between the side walls intermediate the ends of the side walls, said partition dividing the tray into a trough, which lies forward of the partition, and a reservoir, which lies rearward of the partition, said partition being of greater height adjacent the side walls of the receptacle than in its central portion, said central portion constituting a bailie over the top of which paint may be spilled from the reservoir onto a roller applicator disposed in the trough against the partition, and said partition being curved in its lower portion adjacent the bottom of the tray complementary to the peripheral curvature of a roller applicator to receive the applicator, a container mounted at the rear of the tray, the front of which forms the rear wall of the reservoir, said container having a slot in it directly above the bottom of the tray through which paint may flow from the container into the reservoir, the top of said slot being below the top of the central portion of the partition, whereby paint may be retained behind the partition between the partition and the front of the container.

6. A paint tray for use with roller-type applicators, having a bottom wall, and two side walls, said bottom wall being bent upwardly at its front end to form a front wall for the tray, said bottom wall being reversely rolled upon itself at its rear end with an approximately cylindrical roll, there being a space left between the front of said roll and the opposed face of the bottom wall, said side walls being bent at right angles toward one another intermediate their ends and then being bent rearwardly at right angles again, the first-named bent portions of the side walls constituting parts of the rear wall of a trough, a transverse partition extending between the second-named bent portions of the side walls and constituting the rest of the rear wall of said trough, said transverse partition being of less height than said first-named bent portions of the side walls, one of the side walls extending over the end of the rolled portion of the bottom wall and constituting an end of a container comprising said rolled portion, and a removable cap closing the other end of said rolled portion, the

top of said partition being above the space between the front of the rolled portion and the opposed face of the bottom wall, and said partition and the first-named bent portions of the side walls being curved to receive a roller applicator.

GEORGE H. WABN'ITZ.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,014,294 Garvey Jan. 9, 1912 1,938,904 Harris Dec. 12, 1933 1,954,224 Piker Apr. 10, 1934 2,204,190 Siegel June 11, 1949 2,402,346 Rosenlund June 18, 1946 2,600,197 Braun June 10, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1014294 *Aug 28, 1911Jan 9, 1912Christopher A GarveyMarking-pot.
US1938904 *Oct 17, 1930Dec 12, 1933Rivet O Mfg CoStencil ink roller
US1954224 *Jul 27, 1932Apr 10, 1934Sidney PikerPartitioned tray structure
US2204190 *Jun 10, 1939Jun 11, 1940Jane SiegelMoistening apparatus for sealing adhesive surfaces and the like
US2402346 *Dec 14, 1943Jun 18, 1946Rosenlund Harald T CStencil set
US2600197 *Jul 16, 1945Jun 10, 1952Braun Elmer SPaint container and applicator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3110921 *Jun 15, 1962Nov 19, 1963Herbert Conner AdrianPaint roller tray assembly
US3198377 *Apr 30, 1962Aug 3, 1965Buckley Larry JMixing bowl with handle
US3732593 *May 12, 1971May 15, 1973A HabostadPaint roller and tray and cleaner therefor
US3837035 *Apr 5, 1973Sep 24, 1974A HabostadPaint roller tray with self-contained roller cleaning means
US4061242 *Aug 11, 1976Dec 6, 1977Donlon Joseph JDripless paint container
US4199836 *Apr 13, 1979Apr 29, 1980Lovmark August OPaint pan
US5553348 *Jun 19, 1995Sep 10, 1996Brandenburger; Thomas J.Drywall texturing material storage device
US5634568 *Mar 28, 1994Jun 3, 1997Wawrzyniak; GregForearm supported tray
US5735399 *Jun 6, 1996Apr 7, 1998Ste. Marie; Ray M.Paint tray
US6715647Nov 25, 2002Apr 6, 2004Todd IvinsFunnel with support assembly
US6851571Jul 20, 2001Feb 8, 2005The Painter's Thumb, LlcHolder for assisting in holding paint container
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/257.6, 401/120, 220/570, 220/501, 222/457
International ClassificationB44D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB44D3/126
European ClassificationB44D3/12J