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Publication numberUS2669995 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1954
Filing dateApr 28, 1950
Priority dateApr 28, 1950
Publication numberUS 2669995 A, US 2669995A, US-A-2669995, US2669995 A, US2669995A
InventorsTroy Arnold I
Original AssigneeTroy Arnold I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable filter and holder
US 2669995 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1954 R DISPOSABLE FILTER AND HOLDER 2 Sheeis-Sheet 1 Filed April 28. 1950 INVENTOR. BY flrnald F01] HTTUPNEKS' Feb. 23, 1954 A. TROY w DISPOSABLE FILTER AND HOLDER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 28. 1950 IN V EN TOR. flrimld flag H BY KW, fl'wwfi yg Patented Feb. 23, 1954 This 'invent'ioncrelate's" to: a mouthpiece-for cigarettes;-' cigars and: pipes and more partione tovaxmouthpiece containing a filterelement and-Z Whichccan: also serve as a di'sposable holder;

Permanent for non-disposable "cigarette-holders haveerecognized:disadvantages. Thus, they: are i y, they serve" to reinfect: thev user and they accumulate: 'di-stastefulho'dors and flavors?- It is-ran ohjecti'of. this: inventionto provide a: tip

for. cigarettes whichtisuseparatefrom and; at?- tachable to a cigarette and which servesrboth: as a. disposable cigarette or cigar holder: as a. filter: for removing? undesirable products: from the smoke.

t -is.= a; further: object.v ofuthisv'inventiom to;

provide: a filter: in a: tip: which may be: attached."

too-igaitettesghc-i-garsz on'pi nes-aand-whicn filters the:

smoke by cooling.

ltd [Sf a still: further object-of rthisrinventioncto" pnovidessuch; attip-for filtering smokezwhichrcoira tainsa cooling; elementandzean. absorbent eleement.

These-and other-objects: of; thisrmvention will;

becomeimoreapparent upon. considerationaofithea of the-. inouthpiece; devicezshown: inwFia. .-2-..taken;;-

on line 33 in the direction of thGifidffOWS-i;

I Fig.. lis. a :nerspeetive. view of the. -filter"pl-ng of; the filter elementenlarged. and partiallwunea wqnnd; and. 7

li ies/511s a perspeetiverview -of;wa:mo difi6d: filteri plug: made. -aocording;- to: the; invention, enlarged. and. partially unwound.

I11-=genera1 this. invention nrovidesa mouth: piece for a cigarettecontaining- -a. filter. .oom-- nosed: of. a. -meta1-- foil having high-heat. conduc;-. tivity and a. highly" absorbentgpapen arranged; in; alternate layersa-xially-to-the cigarette fitting; mouthpiece. The smokewhen drawn. .th1'ough: the'inouthpiece from. the cigarette,.thnspassingz over-theifilter=,;is cooled-10yv the -meta1:-foil-r element. and. loses-some of: its-r. more: undesirablevcompot nents. by; condensation; The: condensate isiz'in tum removed-from. the =oool: metal foil;-*hysahsorp+- tion:.-into therabsorbing element;

aopreferred? embodiment-t1. as: shown: It; thermwentiom cQmprise'sr-an: outer litmomm (o1. tsp-1o)" whichv contains arc-filter 5H1. ThEifiltrall? mesa portion; of: the cylindricaluinteniorz-o the sheath Ifilz andiithezremaindenofi-the int'ri'b of! the; sheath. l o1 is: f orm'e'di' 'by the wallsiandi that" filter Ms intor-areupelike. recess 1-2 Aeci'gtaret'te? it Baa-attached; to." the:r.m011thpi'eoeJ byt-thezcinse a tion of one end into the recess I122. Thea-race I23 is-rof suffioitent: depths-and therrdlametersotrthe sheatha It is: proportioned". so: that th'e,.coigazret'tjer i5 is. held. securely." in; the: month-pieces held. in. the: mouthpiece; the cigarette: l'3i, when. lit atuthe opposite enduandmsmoked,passes; smokerout intothe sheath 1% and: throughithe filter Hi. The smoke'is: draw-n frontitheasheathz. H by the smoker'throughthe end-1 oppositeetha recess: I2; Therefore in smoking: a cigarette through. the. mouthpiece oi this invention; the: smokemust be -drawn throughthenfi'ltera H as ifiit' were integral with-and" alpartrof. the cigarette: In.

As shown inFig-r 2, .thefi-lter I 1:. contained inathe. =sheath- -'I:O is wound; inia. spiraL-coil offialterw natingglayers ot a metal element HI and .i-a-n 2 ab.- sonhent element 1:5 to form. aefilterpl-ug..1l-8;= The" absonbent element l5 .is=essentiallyv enclosedwvith=- in the spiralwound element 1 4 inrth at the metal-- element: Misthe, longer. and completely-,1 envelopeslthe,absonhent element ll 5: of. the; coilsso. that a: tail lfi of the metal element l4; outer end; oi; the. ooilfloverlaps; the; end. of; the: absorbent .elementnl 5:.andlpart of; inner-.- oonvo lutiontotthe metaleelement. As-shown. in Fig; .13;

the.outermost.convolutionof' thelmetal elementt 1.4:.and the taih-lS-are wrapped;arounctthefilten plug. 1:81 and, are contact withithe. innerzw'al-l ofl the. sheath. 0? and make i a, good-heat tran'snn ,.-1

" sion contact therewi-tln. On. the? other-. hand ti-1eabsorbent element [5 is wound on itselffiat: 7. center of: thefilten I. It to; provide a. core .I L withsn' the-inner cornlolutionyoi;theimetal. element-4 In Eigi 3,,theseotioneotthe sheath.sl 0..=antl=1a filter H shows the; axial alignment-0 5;. theflayersz from each convolutionoathe metal; element; 114:. and. the: absorbent. element The: eons v Isl-t inathe x zicinitm of thetonter. of thEShQathi'iSvShQWRi andthe contignity bet-ween the-inner walk and: thee-sheath Itzandthe outer convolution ofsth. element. t is' shownai As shown ilELFigfSiwla-3, thefilter plug; 118- is :a separaterwpart insertalkrl-e -mtor andrexn'ovable-from,the'sheath;Hts: l mo; modifioat-ion of: :th-isa'invention;the filter: tplug Bmam he: inconporatedr in the "131131: end :of 'a -cigarette to efr-v fectithevsame 'nventivesresnltszrasiinethe 63311305112 ment.:=shown;.-imtherdrawingsz;

In operation, this invention is employed tetra air mover-tram: tha'vsmoke; ofi a cigarette: thosezirri- 3 tating and noxious components which are considered undesirable to the smoker. At the same time, the smoke is cooled so as to remove some of its heat, and therefore bitterness to the taste of the smoker. The impurities are removed by the cooling effect applied to the smoke as it passes through the filter. This cooling is performed by the metal foil over which the cigarette smoke passes. The spiral metal element M in turn is cooled by the conduction of the heat through the wall of the sheath iii to the ambient atmosphere. A the cooling of the smoke lowers its temperature appreciably, some of the impurities in the smoke have their temperatures lowered below the condensation point and they condense onto the surfaces of the metal foil convolutions. The thus condensed impurities present on the metal foil in the liquid state are removed therefrom by absorption in the adjacent absorbent element l which is wound with the metal element It. This absorption tends to add to the cooling of the metal element M and thus prepare for an additional charge of smoke from the cigarette l3. The removal of the condensate from the metal foil surfaces also clears those surfaces to receive additional condensate from subsequent passages of cigarette smoke.

The metal element M may be formed of any metal which has the ability to absorb and conduct and dissipate heat rapidly and is also sufliciently ductile to be formed into athin continuous strip of foil. Aluminum is preferred for this purpose. Copper, silver, gold and magnesium are also suitable conductors and could be used for this purpose. can be varied by variations in the axial length of the filter. The longer the filter is. the better will be its filtering properties and its cooling effect. As shown in Figs. 1 through 4, the metal foil element [A is shown as a smooth or flat strip and the absorbent element I5 is shown as a crinkled or corrugated strip. However, in Fig. 5 the metal foil element Ma is shown as crinkled, corrugated or undulated while the absorbent element Ilia is shown as a smooth or flat strip. Any

form of the unsmooth surfaced element will provide the device of this invention when assembled according to this invention. The important feature of the unsmooth surfaced element is that there be provided thereon a series of alternate grooves and ridges. Also, while the elements I 4 and id have been shown assembled as a pair of juxtaposed layers wound involutely on themselves, the filter may also be made up of cylinders alternately of metal foil and absorbent material.

These cylinders being arranged axially with the sheath 18.

The advantages of the mouthpiece device of this invention include among others a relatively small-tip to be attached to or incorporated in a cigarette which has the effectiveness in cooling and removing impurities that a much longer and more cumbersome filter would have. The components of the filter element of this mouthpiece device are relatively inexpensive and easy to assemble. In addition, the relatively low cost of this mouthpiece makes it disposable with each cigarette and therefore more convenient.

The above described embodiments will be understood as merely illustrative. Various other modifications may be made of the invention, for example, the filter of this invention might be adapted for cigars and for use in the stems of pipes.

A modification of this invention may provide The effectiveness of the filter the metal foil with convolutions in and near the center which have dull surfaces, and convolutions at or near the periphery which have brightened surfaces. This modification employs a physical principle of the absorption and radiation of heat to assist in achieving the object of this invention. A given dull surface absorbs heat more rapidly than a similar bright surface. A bright surface will reflect heat. In the cylindrical cigarette filter which is the preferred embodiment of this invention, the center convolu tions will receive the greatest quantity of smoke. Dulling these convolutions will make them more effective in absorbing heat from the smoke. The outermost convolutions if they are made bright will not absorb as much heat. This differential between the dull inner convolutions and the bright outer convolutions will set up a flow of heat outward to the radiating periphery represented, in part, by the tail It. The heat transferred from within the metal foil element M will finally be dissipated to the atmosphere through the mediation of the plug A8. A further modification of this invention may be had in providing a filter plug made up of convolutions of metal foil alone. It will be readily understood that other modifications may be made of the above described invention without departing from the spirit thereof. It is therefore intended that this invention be limited by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a smoke filter for the heated gases produced upon combustion of tobacco in smoking articles, the combination of a continuous strip of imperforate metal foil wound into a convolute coil, an imperforate strip of absorbent material juxtaposed and interpositioned with said convolute continuous strip of metal foil and convolutely wound to provide with said convolute strip of metal foil alternate layers of metal foil and absorbent material, surfaces of said convolute metal foil and surfaces of said convolute absorbent material being spaced from each other to provide a large number of continuous passages substantially parallel to the axis of the coil through said smoke filterbetween said juxtaposed alternate layers of foil and absorbent material, each passage being of small transverse cross section whereby the condensation from said heated gases on said surfaces of said metal foil is absorbed by said juxtaposed surfaces of said absorbent material and said small passages are maintained substantially free from said condensation products. v v

2. In a combined holder and smoke filterfor treating the heated gases produced upon combustion of tobacco in smoking articles, the combination of an outer cylindrical casing containing a thin continuous strip of imperforate metal foil convolutely wound, an imperforate strip of absorbent material juxtaposed and interpositioned on the said convolute continuous strip of metal foil and convolutely wound to provide with said convolute strip of metal foil alternate layers of metal foil and absorbent material, said coils being positioned in said cylindrical casing to axially receive said heated gases from a smoking article inserted in one end of said cylindrical casing, surfaces of said convolute absorbent material being spaced from said foil surfaces to provide a large number of small continuous passages so as to receive said heated gases, whereby the condensation from said heated gases on said surfaces of said metal foil is absorbed by said juxtaposed surfaces of said absorbent material and said small passages are maintained substantially free from said condensation products.

3. In a smoke filter for a smoking article a laminated sheet of material comprising alternate layers of metal foil and absorbent sheet material, said laminated sheet being shaped into convolute form, said absorbent sheet material being crinkled to provide a plurality of continuous passages and a sleeve of sheet material encompassing said laminated convolute sheet.

4. A smoke filter as claimed in claim 3, wherein the metal foil is crinkled.

5. A smoke filter as claimed in claim 3, wherein the sleeve is of greater length than the coil and is adapted to receive a smoking article therein.

6. A smoke filter as claimed in claim 3, wherein the metal foil is formed with alternate ridges and grooves.

7. A smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the centrally located portion of the coil has dull surfaces and the outer portions of the coil have bright surfaces.

8. A filter for a smoking article comprising a coiled laminated structure consisting of superposed sheets, each sheet being of a different material, the materials being in alternate overlapping relationship, said materials being a sheet of metal foil and a sheet of cellulosic material, the cellulosic material having the characteristic of absorbing the liquids and retarding the passage of solvents and the metal foil material having the characteristic of causing the condensation of gases that contact the toil surface as the gases pass through the laminated structure, the said superposed sheets being convolutely wound to provide alternate layers of metal foil and absorbent material, said cellulosic material including means for spacing the said material from the metal foil, surfaces of said convolutely wound superposed sheets being spaced from each other to provide a large number of continuous passages substantially parallel to the axis of the coiled structure through said laminated structure and each passage being of small cross section whereby the condensation of said heated gases on said surfaces of said metal foil is absorbed by said juxtaposed surfaces of said absorbent material.

9. In a smoke filter as claimed in claim 3, wherein said absorbent sheet crinkles provide longitudinally extending small cross-sectional passages throughout the length of said convolute laminated sheet.

ARNOLD I. TROY.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 769,546 Koch Sept. 6, 1904 1,883,715 Greene Oct. 18, 1932 2,035,398 Muller Mar. 24, 1936 2,13 ,222 Starr Nov. 8, 1938 2,2 1,166 Ross Aug. 13, 1940 2,221,443 Davidson Nov. 12, 1940 v FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 464,298 Germany Aug. 21, 1928 9,228 Great Britain 1911

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2804874 *Jan 11, 1955Sep 3, 1957Samuel VisnickFilter tobacco product
US2827903 *Feb 13, 1956Mar 25, 1958Henry NiedermanSelf cooling filter cigarette
US2848000 *Mar 25, 1954Aug 19, 1958Herbster George BCigarette holder
US2866465 *Mar 22, 1954Dec 30, 1958Cigarette Components LtdPaper tubes
US2893399 *Jul 25, 1957Jul 7, 1959Jacoby Hans GSmoking article with filtering means
US2976190 *May 27, 1957Mar 21, 1961Meyer Louis CCigarettes
US2998819 *Jun 2, 1958Sep 5, 1961Snowden Jr William AHeat reducing cigarette filter
US2998820 *May 1, 1959Sep 5, 1961Ades Viola GCigarette
US3020977 *Aug 19, 1959Feb 13, 1962Simpson Herbert CorpFilter device
US3028864 *Apr 7, 1959Apr 10, 1962Ibc Res Lab IncMethods and devices for filtering tobacco smoke
US3062218 *Feb 6, 1961Nov 6, 1962Temkovits Charles ESmoke cooling cigarettes
US3070937 *May 5, 1960Jan 1, 1963Mine Safety Appliances CoMist removing device
US3122430 *Jun 27, 1960Feb 25, 1964Linde Eismasch AgOil separator for gases
US3152690 *Feb 13, 1962Oct 13, 1964Celanese CorpDispensing containers
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US3304944 *Feb 21, 1964Feb 21, 1967Badertscher Allen EFilter cartridge for tobacco products
US3318315 *Jun 18, 1964May 9, 1967Orter Ralph HCigarette holder and smoker
US3411512 *May 31, 1966Nov 19, 1968Wayne A. JohnsonElectrolytic tobacco smoke filter
US3455455 *Mar 3, 1967Jul 15, 1969Purolator Products IncDevice for the analysis of the filter characteristics of porous media
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US4116650 *Mar 30, 1977Sep 26, 1978Lane Arlo EDevice for preventing circulation of liquid water entrained in compressed air
US4889143 *May 14, 1986Dec 26, 1989R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette rods and filters containing strands provided from sheet-like materials
US5360023 *Jun 12, 1992Nov 1, 1994R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette filter
US5404890 *Jun 11, 1993Apr 11, 1995R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette filter
US5685323 *Jul 24, 1995Nov 11, 1997R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyDisposable filter attachment for smoking articles
US5724997 *Dec 21, 1995Mar 10, 1998R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyDisposable flavored filter for cigarettes
DE1123608B *Jun 18, 1958Feb 8, 1962Alfred HummelFilter fuer Tabakrauch
WO1989003183A1 *Oct 4, 1988Apr 20, 1989Luigi BasoneNew antinicotine filter for cigarettes
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/344, 131/187, 55/521, 55/520
International ClassificationA24D3/00, A24D3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA24D3/04
European ClassificationA24D3/04