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Publication numberUS2670530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1954
Filing dateJan 6, 1949
Publication numberUS 2670530 A, US 2670530A, US-A-2670530, US2670530 A, US2670530A
InventorsGerard M. Regnier
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for making terminal strips
US 2670530 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 2, 1954 Q MREGN|ER 2,670,530

METHOD FOR MAKING TERMINAL STRIPS AND THE LIKE Filed Jan. e,V 1949 I I M53 v *I a L Patented Mar. 2, 17954 METHOD FOR MAKING TERMINAL STRIPSi AND THE LIKE Gerard M. Regnier, Chicago, Ill. Application January 6, 19049, Serial No. 69,490

4 Claims. 1

'Ihis invention relates to radio terminal strips and the like, and to a novel method for manufacturing the same. More particularly, the invention is directed to a production method for manufacturing terminal strips comprising insulating mounting strips and having electrical conducting terminal lugs afxed thereto.

In the construction and assembly of electrical devices containing wiring systems such as phonographs, radios, television sets, testing equipment, electrical or electronic amusement machines and the like, terminal strips are used extensively for mounting, connecting and guiding electrical conductors. Heretofore these strips have been manufactured by aixing terminal and mounting lugs, made of electrical conductive materials such as brass, copper and the like, which have previously been shaped and cut to the desired size and form, to strips of non-conductive materials such as wood, rubber, plastics and the like. Obviously such a method of manufacture required considerable skill, time and labor.

1It is, therefore, a primary object of this invention to provide a terminal strip and method for manufacturing the same which will overcome all of the disadvantages set forth above.

Another object is to provide a radio terminal strip and the like having both its lugs and mounting strip integrally formed.

A further object is to provide a novel method r" for manufacturing terminal strips, mounting lugs, sliding multiswitches and the like.

Still another object is to provide a method for manufacturing terminal strips and the like which entirely eliminates the necessity for aiiixing the metallic members of the strip to the mounting strip.

Still a further object is to afford a method for manufacturing terminal strips and the like which permits the substitution of metallic sheets and plates for strip material.

Yet a further object is to provide a method for manufacturing terminal strips and the like in which the conductor members are bonded to the non-conductive member.

Yet another object is to afford a method for manufacturing terminal strips and the like which eliminates a number of costly manufacturing operations.

And still a further object is to provide a terminal strip and the like of sturdy construction, but yet less expensive than those now being used.

For the purpose of facilitating an understanding of my invention I have illustrated in the accompanying drawings a preferred embodiment thereof together with diagrams, from an inspection of which, when considered in connection with the following description together with my discussion thereof, should result an understanding of the manner of practicing the methods of this invention, the construction, assembly and use of the invention and an appreciation of the many advantages inherent therein.

Referring to the drawings in which the same characters of reference are employed to indicate corresponding or similar parts throughout the several figures of the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a radio terminal strip embodying the principles of this invention;

Fig. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the blanks from which the terminal strip is made;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the assembled blanks shown in Fig. 2, and illustrates the next step in the method of manufacturing the radio terminal strips;

Fig. 4 illustrates the next step in the method of manufacturing the terminal strips; and

Fig. 5 is a cross sectional view taken on line 5-5 in Fig. 4, viewed in the direction indicated and showing how the members are bonded together.

Referring now to Fig. 1 of the drawings, reference numeral I0 indicates a radio terminal strip comprising a mounting member I2, terminal lugs I4, I6, I8 and 20 and mounting lugs 22 and 24.

The mounting strip I2 may be made from an electrical insulating material such as. rubber, wood, plastics, pressed libre and the like, but I prefer to use a laminated paper fifty per cent (50%) impregnated with a phenolic resin such as phenol-formaldehyde. This aifords a thermosetting plastic such as is marketed under the trade name Lamicoid There are a number of other thermo-setting plastics as Well as thermoplastics which may serve equally well. d

The terminal lugs I4, I6, IB and 20 may be formed with slot shaped perforations 25, 28, 30 and 32 to which the wires may be affixed as by soldering. These strips may be formed from any electrically conductive material such as brass,

- bronze, copper, plated metals and the like. How.-

ever, I prefer to use plated brass because of its favorable soldering characteristics. The mounting lugs 22 and 24 may also be perforated asat 34 and 35 for mounting' purposes.

It will be noted that all of the lugs are formed from the protruding ends of strips which are embedded in the mounting strip I2 as illustrated Yin dotted outliney in Fig. l of the-drawings. However, all of the lugs are insulated one from the other are also separated one from the other, but are v likewise joined at one end by a blank portion 65.

In the next step the plastic blanks 48 and 50 are positioned so that their corresponding longitudinal strips are aligned, one with the other, and the metallic sheet iii-l is then inserted. therebetween so that its transverse strips such as lll to B4 are positioned between the plastic strips l2, 52, 54 and 5B as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings. A number oi such assembled units,l each separated by a pressing plate, are then. placed in a hydraulic laminating press subjected simultaneously to heat and pressure so that the plastic ows around themetal strips to iorrn a tight hond therewith as shown in 5 of the drawings. l have found that a temperature ranging from 250 F. to 469 F., and a pressure of irom 2,560 pounds per square inch to 5,000 pounds per square inch produces the best results. should be maintained for a period of from six (6) to fifteen (l5) minutes to insure proper bonding. This period I call the curing cycle. Alter the curing cycle is completed and the plastic is properly set, the sheets are then removed from the press and the metallic strips are perforated, as by stamping, to aiord a semi-finished bien: such as shown in Fig. 4 oi' the drawings. This blank is then cut into the separate mounting strips such as that illustrated in Fig. l.

If desired. the last two steps may be combined by using a progressive die which will both perorate and cut the material at the same time. Likewise, a single plastic blank may be utilized ior each metallic blank 5S lby merely folding a sheet such as 53 along a transverse axis (book fashion) to envelope the metallic sheet 59. The laminating press may be oi the hydraulic or air type and may be electrically, steam or otherwise heated. It should also be understood that the various steps may be somewhat altered or performed in different sequence. Thus, the bonded blank may first be eut into individual strips and then perforated.

It should be understood that the number, shape and form of the terminal lugs as well as of the "4' strips, which is the subject of this invention, not F' only permits manufacture on a production basis, eliminates a number of costly steps and reduces the amount of labor required to manufacture the same, but alsov affords a much sturdier terminal strip` since the mounting and terminal lugs are This pressure and temperature 4 integrally formed with the mounting member rather than merely axed thereto as by hanging, riveting or soldering.

While I have set forth certain theoretical explanations of the method of manufacturing my invention, I do not wish to be limited by such theories, since the results obtained may or may not be explained thereby. Such explanation has been included onli7 with the view that the specilication may be made clear and more complete. It is my desire to secure the invention as pointed out in the appended claims regardless of the theory upon which itis based. It is believed that my invention in all ci its phases has been clearly set forth herein such that the practicing of the method and construction of the device should be readily understood without further description, and it should be manifest that the details of the method and of the embodiment described are capable of wide variation within the purview of the invention as described in the appended claims.

What l2 claim and desire to secure by Letters latent of the United States is:

l. The method of manufacturing term'nal strips and the like which comprises the steps of assembling a plurality of parallelly arranged but separated electrical conductors between a plurality oi pairs of aligned insulating strips, the axes of said conductors and insulating strips being substantially perpendicular to each other, said pairs of insulators spaced one from the other to ailord exposed portions of said conductors therebetween, subjecting said assembled insulators and conductors to heat and pressure until the same are iused together into a blank, simultaneously perforating the exposed portions of said conductors and punching through said blank along an irregular line passing through the inner conductor strips adjacent the rearward edge of one insulating strip and through the outer conductor strips adjacent the forward edge of the next rearward insulating strip thereby simultaneously forming the lugs and severing a nished terminal strip from the blank.

2. The method of manufacturing terminal strips and the like which comprises the steps of forming a sheet of insulating material to aord a blank consisting of a plurality of parallel strips joined together at one end thereof, folding said blank about its transverse mid-axis to envelop a plurality of parallelly arranged but separated electrical conductors therebetween, the axes of said conductors and insulators being substantially perpendicular to each other, fusing said conductors and insulators together, simultaneously perforating the exposed portions of said conductors and punching through said blank along an irregular line passing through the inner conductor strips adjacent the rearward edge of one insulating strip and through the outer conductor strips adjacent the forward edge of the next rearward insulating strip thereby simultaneously forming the lugs and severing a nished terminal strip from the blank.

3. The method of manufacturing terminal strips and the like which comprises the steps of forming a plurality of sheets of insulating mate-` rial to afford blanks consisting of a plurality of parallel strips joined together at one end thereof, forming a plurality of sheets oi electrical conducting material to aiord similar blanks having a plurality of parallel strips joined together at one end thereof, assembling one of said conductor blanks between two ci said insulator blanks so that the axes of said conductor and insulator strips are at substantially right angles to each other and the strips of one insulator blank are aligned with the corresponding strips of 'the other .5 insulator blank, fusing said blanks together, simultaneously perforating the exposed portions of said conductors and punching through said blank along an irregular line passing through the inner conductor strips adjacent the rearward edge of one insulating strip and through the outer conductor strips adjacent the forward edge of the next rearward insulating strip thereby simultaneously forming the lugs and severing a finished terminal strip from the blank.

4 The method of manufacturing terminal strips and the like which comprises the steps of forming a plurality .of sheets of phenolic resink impregnated laminated paper material to ailord blanks consisting of a plurality of parallel strips joined together at one end thereof, forming a plurality of sheets of metallic electrical conducting material to afford similar blanks having a plurality of parallel strips joined together at one end thereof, assembling each of saidv conductor blanks between at least two of said insulator blanks so that the axes of said conductor and insulator strips are at substantially right angles to each other and the strips of one insulator blank are aligned with the corresponding strips of the other insulator blank, placing a plurality of said assembled blanks within a laminating press with a pressing plate separating each assembly, subjecting said assembled blanks to a temperature of not less than 250 F. nor more than 400 F. and a pressure of from 2,500 to 5,000 pounds per square inch for a period of from six to fifteen Cri minutes, simultaneously perforatng the exposed portions of said conductors and punching through said blank along an irregular line passing through the inner conductor strips adjacent the rearward edge of one insulating strip and through the outer conductor strips adjacent the forward edge of the next rearward insulating strip thereby simultaneously forming the lugs and severing a finished terminal strip from the blank.

GERARD M. REGNIER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,287,101 Reynolds Dec. 10, 1918 1,334,276 Adams Mar. 23, 1920 1,514,618 Ide Nov. 11, 1924 2,073,466 Del Camp Mar. 9, 1937 2,087,330 Pagenkopf July 20, 1937 2,182,968 Lunsford Dec. 12, 1939 2,301,288 Knauf Nov. 10, 1942 2,350,887 Goff June 6, 1944 2,431,393 Franklin Nov. 25, 1947 2,441,181 Bartelheim May 11, 1948 2,447,541 Sabee Aug. 24, 1948 2,517,848 Del Camp Aug. 8, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 201,092 Great Britain July 26, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1287101 *Aug 1, 1917Dec 10, 1918Western Electric CoMethod of manufacturing multiple-contact strips.
US1334276 *Mar 31, 1916Mar 23, 1920Western Electric CoContact-terminal bank
US1514618 *Jul 12, 1920Nov 11, 1924Kellogg Switchboard & SupplyTerminal strip
US2073466 *May 10, 1935Mar 9, 1937Cinch Mfg CorpElectrical wiring installation and contact lug
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US2301288 *Oct 31, 1940Nov 10, 1942Rca CorpTerminal
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US2431393 *Jul 14, 1945Nov 25, 1947Jacob PosterMethod of forming metal and attaching it to a support
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2734257 *Apr 24, 1951Feb 14, 1956Telejonsson
US2845606 *Apr 1, 1954Jul 29, 1958Amp IncInsulated wire end terminal
US2870274 *May 26, 1955Jan 20, 1959Standard Coil Prod Co IncElectrical wafer switches
US2874363 *Sep 15, 1953Feb 17, 1959Merrill J AinsworthElectrical connector with flexible contacts
US2952828 *Apr 3, 1957Sep 13, 1960Contraves AgTerminal board arrangement for selective interconnection
US2955352 *Oct 22, 1954Oct 11, 1960Ind Electronic Hardware CorpMethod of manufacturing a socket for sub-miniature electronic devices
US2964171 *Jan 15, 1958Dec 13, 1960Thomas & Betts CorpStrip connectors
US3057047 *Jun 19, 1958Oct 9, 1962Gen ElectricMethod of manufacturing circuit controlling devices
US3080640 *Oct 31, 1958Mar 12, 1963Philips CorpMethod of manufacturing semi-conductive electrode systems
US3086281 *May 6, 1957Apr 23, 1963Beckman Arnold OSemiconductor leads and method of attaching
US3202958 *Feb 27, 1961Aug 24, 1965Baldwin Lima Hamilton CorpElectrical terminal strip
US3219785 *Feb 1, 1960Nov 23, 1965Cts CorpMultiple contact stator unit for rotary switch and method of making the same
US4167808 *Aug 15, 1977Sep 18, 1979Giddings & Lewis, Inc.Harness for electromagnetic transducer
US5710393 *May 17, 1995Jan 20, 1998The Whitaker CorporationModular array termination for multiconductor electrical cables
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/884, 156/290, 439/710, 156/253
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/20