Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2671578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1954
Filing dateJun 20, 1950
Priority dateJun 20, 1950
Publication numberUS 2671578 A, US 2671578A, US-A-2671578, US2671578 A, US2671578A
InventorsMcbean Douglas M
Original AssigneeMcbean Douglas M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure can having a flexible material holding bag therein
US 2671578 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 9, 1954 D, MCBEAN 2,671,578

PRESSURE CAN HAVING A FLEXIBLE MATERIAL HOLDING BAG THEREIN Filed June 20, 1950 INN T I0 12 y 2/ 1-L I v M M W 45 l6 2 INVENTOR- DOUGLAS M. M BEAN BY Patented Mar. 9, 1954 PRESSURE CAN HAVING A FLEXIBLE MATE- RIAL HOLDING BAG THEREIN Douglas M. McBean, Rochester, N. Y. Application June 20, 1950, Serial No. 169,209

4 Claims. 1

The present invention relates to dispensing apparatus and more particularly to pressure cans such as may be used for containing and dispensing liquids, or pasty materials. More particularly the invention relates to pressure cans for holding and dispensing lacquers, paints, chemicals, soda fountain syrups, mayonnaise, icings, whipped cream, etc.

Whipped cream is now being sold extensively in pressure cans, being charged with a suitable, inert gas so that whenever a valve in the can is opened, cream in whipped form may be forced out of the can. The vapor pressure of carbon dioxide, however, is approximately 850 p. s. i. If any quantity of liquid carbon dioxide were introduced into cream or other material, the can would explode. Consequently the only way the cream or other material can be charged with carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide is by the same method as charged water, namely by charging it with a gas. With this arrangement, however, when the can is partially emptied of its contents, it is necessary to shake the can vigorously several times before enough pressure can be built up in the can to force further cream out of the can. Even then, when the can is pretty well emptied the pressure, that can be built up, is insuificient to force the last of the contents out of the can. As the can is emptied, the pressure in the can will be reduced because the gas is escaping with the product. Hence, there is always some wastage of cream.

With other materials, such as, for instance, marshmallow there are disadvantages to use of known types of pressure cans. If the marshmallow in the can is charged sufficiently with an inert gas, such as carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide, for the gas to build up sufficient pressure to dispense the contents of the can, then the contents of the can do not come out with the fiuffiness that is desired.

Conventional types of pressure cans for dispensing materials other than whipped cream are, moreover, bulky and inconvenient to use. Moreover, known types of pressure cans are limited in use. For instance, the known types of pressure cans which are used for dispensing acids and other chemicals are unfit for storing the contents once they are opened. They are lined with a plastic material to protect the can itself, but the cans must be opened by puncturing through the can and liner. the can to get back of the liner and either destroy the can or contaminate the contents. Hence, when such a can is opened, it is unfit for further storage of its contents.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a pressure can for dispensing a liquid or a pastry material which is so constructed as to deliver the material at any time instantaneously, simply upon opening of a valve, and regardless of the amount or dispensable material left in the can.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pressure can for dispensing whipped cream, free flowing, or viscous liquids, or pasty materials which is so constructed that it will deliver out of the can even the last remaining portion of the contents of the can, without any manipulation of the can on the part of the user except for pressing open the outlet valve.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pressure can for dispensing either free-flowing or viscous materials which is so constructed that the dispensable material will not come into contact with the can, but will be held within a plastic bag to which pressure may be applied to dispense in controlled quantities the contents of the can.

Another object of the invention is to provide a dispensing pressure can in which the contents, as, for instance, marshmallow, may be charged with an inert gas, such as carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide, whose pressure is such as to cause the material to be dispensed in fluffy form but is not sufficient to force the material from the can, and still have a can which will completely dispense the material.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pressure can for dispensing either free-flowing or viscous materials from a plastic bag which is so constructed that the pressure on the bag may be equalized and all of the contents of the bag may be dispensed.

Still further objects of the invention are to provide a pressure can of the type described which will be easy to use, and of relatively low cost.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a pressure can constructed according to one embodiment of this invention;

, Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view through this can, taken at right angles to the view of Fig. 1 and showing the dispensing valve in closed position; and

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of the can, showing the dispensing valve open.

Referring now to the drawing by numerals of reference, It! denotes the can body. This may be of any suitable shape. It is closed at its base This allows the contents of by a bottom H which may be sealed in any conventional manner to the can. It has a rolled over lip 12 at its top forming an opening that is closed in use by the cap I3.

The cap has an in-turned horizontal, circular flange portion l4 and is formed with a central sleeve l5. This sleeve has at its bottom end an out-turned horizontal, circular flange it. Mounted within the sleeve is a rubber valve seat .20 which is spool-like in shape and has upper and lower end portions 21 and 22 of enlarged diameter seating against the upper and lower faces, respectively, of the flange portions M and it, respectively, of the cap.

Disposed centrally within the rubber valve seat 23 is a valve having a head 25 and a stem 23. The head of the valve is adapted to seat against the underface of portion 22 of valve seat 29. The stem 25 projects upwardly through the bore 32 of the valve seat 20 and is secured by threads or otherwise to a knob 21. This knob has a diagonal duct 33 and a central duct 3! formed in it. The diagonal duct 3s extends from the outside of the knob to the central duct 3i. The central duct 3! is in alignment with the bore 32 in the rubber valve seat 20.

Mounted on the sleeve portion l of the cap i3 is a tube 35. This tube is of reduced diameter at its upper end to fit tightly around the outside of sleeve portion l5 and is formed with a shoulder that rests upon the flange it of the cap. The tube 35 extends down close to the bottom of the can; and at its bottom portion the tube is provided with a bell-shaped inlet 36 that is provided with a plurality of inlet openings 31. Secured at its upper end to the outside of the tube 35 is a flexible plastic bag or container 43. This may be vulcanized or otherwise secured to the reduced diameter portion of the tube 35.

The material, which is to be dispensed, is placed in the bag or container; and Freon or a similar liquid of. suitable vapor pressure which vaporizes readily, is placed in the space M between the bag or container id and the inside wall of the can.

To equalize the pressure between the top and the bottom of the can, a conductor tube 45 is preferably secured in the can at one side thereof as by soldering. This tube conveys the Freon gas from top to bottom of the can, or vice versa,

to equalize the pressure on the top and bottom of the bag 45. Thus, the Freon, or other propellant is prevented from being sealed off in the bottom of the can by the bag, which would make it difficult, if not impossible, to empty the bag. Thus, also, there is prevented any chance that pressure on the top of the bag might build up to such an extent as to make it difficult to maintain the bag 43 on the valve seat Zil.

In preparing the pressure can for the market, the cap 13 may be sealed in the top of the container with the tube 35, valve seat 25-, valve 25, and knob 21 secured in it. The bag 40, which has been filled with the product, which is to be dispensed, may then be sealed to the upper end of the tube 35. After a suificient quantity of Freon has been placed in the can It, the bottom I I may be sealed in the can. The space between the bag 43 and the inside wall of the can is not completely filled with Freon so that the Freon may vaporize readily to put pressure upon the bag. To dispense the material, which is in the bag, the user depresses the knob 21, opening the valve 25, as shown in Fig. 3. The pressure of the gas around its openings 31, up through the tube 35, through the open valve 25, and out through the ducts 32, 3| and 33 as long as the valve is held depressed. As soon as the pressure on the knob 21 is released, the elasticity of the valve seating member 25 restores the valve 25 to closed position as shown in Fig. 2. The under side of the knob 21 is provided with an annular recess 38 to permit of the depression of the knob.

As the contents of the bag are dispensed, room is provided for the Freon to vaporize. The expanding Freon, therefore, applies the required pressure at all times so that all the contents of the bag can be dispensed. The bell-bottom 36 of the tube 35 prevents the pressure of the gas from forcing the bag up into the mouth of the tube 35 and clogging the tube. Even though the pressure of the gas might force the bag completely across the bottom of the bell, the material, which is to be dispensed, can still flow into the tube 35 through the openings 37 of the bell. The tube 45 insures equalization of pressure on the top and bottom of the bag.

For dispensing whipped cream, cream charged with a suitable, inert gas will still be loaded into the bag 46. This is in order that the cream may be delivered from the port 35 in whipped form. With my can, however, as contrasted with prior structures, all of the cream can be dispensed from the can because it is the Freon pressing on the bag, not the charging gas in the cream itself, which determines the delivery of the cream. Thus, with a can made according to my invention there is no wastage.

Furthermore, the cans of the present invention have special advantages for storing and dispensing marshmallow and similar materials. The marshmallow can be charged with an inert gas whose vapor pressure is not sufficient to force the material from the can, the vaporizable material around the bag, such as Freon, being used to supply the dispensing pressure. It is therefore possible with the present invention to slightly impregnate or charge any material in the bag with any desired quantity of gas to produce flufiiness or marshmallow effect without worrying about having enough pressure for dispensing the material. The dispensing pressure gas is wholly separated from the fluning gas.

Moreover, with the present invention comparatively light weight, relatively cheap cans may be employed for dispensing charged materials. The material, such as whipped cream, mayonnaise or marshmallow may be impregnated with an inert gas, such as carbon dioxide, in sufiicient quantity to cause the foaming action when the material is expelled from the can while the Freon, which has a vapor pressure of between 28 and'70 p. s. i., depending upon the blend used, will, when introduced between the can and bag, produce a constant pressure: at all times on the bag, providing the temperature of the can remains constant.

A can made according to the present invention provides not only a handy container for any liquid or pasty material but also a convenient, com-- pact dispensing device for such material. A single can provides not only a container for a lacthe bag forces the material out of the bag in through the bell-bottom 36 of the tube 35 and quer, a paint, a chemical, a soda-fountain syrup, mayonnaise, icing, whipped cream, or another liquid or pasty material, but also provides an easily-manipulable dispenser for the material. No air-pressure pump, air-line or other pressureapplying means is required to dispense the material from the can. Yet the can is simple in construction andits cost relatively low.

It is possible to makethe valve, syphon tube, and all components of the dispensing mechanism of a can constructed according to'the present invention completely of a plastic material so that they .will not be affected by acids, or other material contained. within the plastic bag. A can made according to this invention, therefore, may be used for dispensing any freely flowing or viscous material.

While the invention has been disclosed in connection with a can having a single bag and a single control valve, it will be understood that any suitable number of bags and valves may be provided. For photographic purposes, therefor, it will be possible with the present invention to supply a dispensing pressure can having one bag that contains a developer, another that holds acetic acid, a third that contains hypo, etc., the contents of the several bags being dispensable under pressure by manipulation of the proper valve.

While the invention has been described then in connection with ,a particular embodiment thereof and a particular use therefor it is capable of various further modifications and uses, and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations of the invention following, in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth and as fall within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. Apparatus for dispensing liquids, pasty materials, and the like, comprising an enclosed container having a centrally-disposed opening therein at one end thereof, a flexible bag sus pended from its top in said opening in such wise that some space is left between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said bag being adapted to hold the material which is to be dispensed and being closed except at its top, a discharge tube mounted within said bag coaxially with and within said opening and extending down into the bag from said opening close to the bottom of the bag, said tube being open at both ends, said bag being mounted with its top sealed about said tube and said opening, a manually-operable valve normally closing the upper discharge-end of the tube, a manually movable knob secured to said valve for moving the valve to open it, said knob having a discharge duct therein which communicates with the discharge end of said tube when the knob is moved to open said valve, means for constantly urging said valve to closed position, and a readily vaporizable liquid disposed in the space between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said liquid only partially filling said space so that room is provided in which the liquid may vaporize to apply pressure on the bag to force material out of the bag when the valve is open.

2. Apparatus for dispensing liquids, pasty materials, and the like, comprising an enclosed container having a centrally-disposed opening therein at one end thereof, a flexible bag suspended from its top in said container about said opening and in such wise that some space is left between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said bag being adapted to hold the material which is to be dispensed and being closed except at its top, a discharge tube mounted in said opening and extending down into said bag close to the bottom of said bag, said tube being open at both ends and having a bell mouth at the end adjacent the bottom of the bag, said bell portion having a plurality of inlet openings therein disposed about the latter end of the tube, a rectilinearly reciprocable valve normally closingthe opening in the opposite discharge endof the tube, a knob secured to said valve for manually depressing said valve to open it, said knob having a discharge duct therein which communicates with the discharge end of said tube when said knob is depressed to open said valve, resilient means for constantly urging said valve to closed position, and a readily vaporizable liquid disposed in the space between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said liquid only partially filling said space so that room is provided in which the liquid may vaporize to apply pressure on the bag to force material out of the bag when the valve is open.

3. Apparatus for dispensing liquids, pasty materials, and the like, comprising an enclosed container having a centrally-disposed opening there in at one end thereof, a flexible bag suspended in said container about said opening and in such wise that some space is left between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said bag being adapted to hold the material which is to be dispensed, a discharge tube mounted in said opening and extending down close to the bottom of said bag, said tube being open at both ends and having a bell mouth at the end adjacent the bottom of the bag, said bell portion having a plurality of inlet openings therein disposed about the latter end of the tube, a spool-shaped rubber valve-seat mounted in the discharge end of said tube, a valve having a head adapted to seat against the inside face of said seat, and having a stem extending through the bore of said seat, a manually depressible knob secured to the outside end of said stem and having a discharge duct therein which communicates with the bore of said seat and with said tube when the knob is depressed to open the valve, and a readilyvaporizable liquid disposed in the space between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said liquid only partially filling said space so that room is provided in which the liquid may vaporize to apply pressure on the bag to force material out of the bag when the valve is open.

4. Apparatus for dispensing liquids, pasty materials, and the like, comprising an enclosed container, a flexible bag mounted in said container in such wise that some space is left between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said bag being adapted to contain the material which is to be dispensed, a manually operable valve movably mounted in the container and in an opening in said bag to control discharge of material from said bag, said bag being closed except for its discharge opening, means constantly urging said valve to closed position to close said discharge opening and said container, and a readily-vaporizable liquid disposed in the space between the outside of the bag and the inside of the container, said liquid only partially filling said space so that room is provided in which the liquid may vaporize to apply pressure on the bag to force material out of the bag when the valve is open, and a tube mounted in the container and extending from the bottom of the con- Refere ces Cited the .file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Medley "-"wWW Dec. 1, 1903 Numb Number 8 Name Date Huss Feb. 10, 1914 Gammnter -Dec. 5, 1916 Cocks Mar. 18, I930 Bystricky et '11. ..-Apr. 9, 1985 'Piquerez Jan. 11, 1038 Reader July 20, 1943 Moore Apr. '6, 1948 Leonard Mar. 22. 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US745876 *Sep 5, 1903Dec 1, 1903Joseph Ferrell MedleyLiquid-dispensing vessel.
US1086532 *May 5, 1913Feb 10, 1914Henry HussLiquid-dispensing device.
US1207393 *Oct 24, 1914Dec 5, 1916John R GammeterFire-extinguisher.
US1751129 *May 5, 1928Mar 18, 1930Nathaniel C BarnesDispenser
US1996792 *Jun 26, 1933Apr 9, 1935Stewart Warner CorpLubricating apparatus
US2105160 *Dec 8, 1936Jan 11, 1938Emile PiqueresApparatus for emptying drums containing very thick lubricants or other viscous materials
US2324648 *Jun 4, 1940Jul 20, 1943Roeder Paul FCream whipping apparatus
US2439053 *May 24, 1943Apr 6, 1948Moore George LLubricating device
US2465023 *Jun 23, 1944Mar 22, 1949 Oil can
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2816690 *Mar 23, 1953Dec 17, 1957Voir Lari RayPressure packaging system for liquids
US2816691 *Aug 16, 1954Dec 17, 1957Ward Lawrence TSpray device having a flexible sac lining
US2859899 *Aug 11, 1955Nov 11, 1958Gulf Research Development CoDispensing apparatus
US2890652 *Mar 4, 1955Jun 16, 1959Roto Werke AgInking devices for printing machines
US2925942 *May 21, 1957Feb 23, 1960Grand Central Rocket CompanyLiquid dispenser
US2937791 *Dec 31, 1954May 24, 1960Micallef Lewis APressure discharge can
US2953304 *Dec 16, 1955Sep 20, 1960Colgate Palmolive CoDispensing container
US2978144 *Mar 15, 1957Apr 4, 1961Roto Werke AgSelf-emptying pressure vessels
US3020688 *Jul 8, 1958Feb 13, 1962Modern Lab IncMethod for filling and assembling a compartmented pressurized dispensing device
US3083875 *Jan 12, 1959Apr 2, 1963Welty FrankApparatus for packaging and dispensing beverages or the like
US3089624 *Jun 28, 1956May 14, 1963Leeds & MicallefPressure discharge container
US3178062 *Apr 26, 1960Apr 13, 1965Frank WeltyDispensing apparatus for pre-mixed beverages
US3181735 *Aug 14, 1962May 4, 1965White Lab IncPressurized dispenser
US3225967 *Feb 18, 1963Dec 28, 1965Trichema AgDevice for dispensing liquids, pastes and other flowable material
US3240399 *Aug 14, 1963Mar 15, 1966Ned W FrandeenDispensing receptacle
US3245435 *Dec 12, 1963Apr 12, 1966Colgate Palmolive CoPressurized dispenser with propellant bag
US3255972 *May 11, 1965Jun 14, 1966HultgrenDisposable container
US3278084 *Aug 6, 1965Oct 11, 1966Omark Industries IncImpact tool
US3323206 *May 7, 1964Jun 6, 1967Allied ChemProcess for the manufacture of an aerosol container
US3335913 *Aug 25, 1965Aug 15, 1967Ejectoret SaPressure dispensing device for fluid material
US3342377 *Apr 7, 1966Sep 19, 1967Hewlett Packard CoDispensing container
US3486661 *Dec 22, 1967Dec 30, 1969Friedrich RichardDevice for discharging liquid and pasty substances under pressure
US3662926 *Jan 19, 1971May 16, 1972Clayton CorpValve and bag assembly for pressure dispensing
US3731847 *Jun 1, 1971May 8, 1973Gillette CoPlural compartment pressurized dispensing package
US3788521 *Jul 10, 1972Jan 29, 1974Laauwe Robert HAerosol package
US3896970 *Oct 26, 1973Jul 29, 1975Laauwe Robert HAerosol package of product containing liquified gas
US3940026 *Jul 13, 1973Feb 24, 1976KrdcContainer for pressure dispensing of fluid
US4008830 *Mar 20, 1975Feb 22, 1977Philip MeshbergLiquid dispenser using a non vented pump and a collapsible plastic bag
US4088248 *Jul 22, 1976May 9, 1978Blake William SSprayer-dispenser pumps
US4420099 *Jun 10, 1981Dec 13, 1983Precision Valve CorporationCup-shaped actuator for aerosol dispenser
US4673107 *Aug 7, 1984Jun 16, 1987Sterling Drug, Inc.Two-compartment dosing package
US4752018 *Apr 17, 1985Jun 21, 1988The Coca-Cola CompanyMicro-gravity pre-mix package
US4779736 *Sep 27, 1985Oct 25, 1988Gordon GeaslandTubular plastic shipping, storage and dispensing container
US5059187 *May 4, 1990Oct 22, 1991Dey Laboratories, Inc.Method for the cleansing of wounds using an aerosol container having liquid wound cleansing solution
US6290667 *Jun 11, 1999Sep 18, 2001Health & Technology, Inc.Nasal aspirator
US6439430Sep 22, 2000Aug 27, 2002Summit Packaging Systems, Inc.Collapsible bag, aerosol container incorporating same and method of assembling aerosol container
US20060157258 *Jan 14, 2005Jul 20, 2006Ching-Huan LinFire extinguisher can
US20100320230 *Aug 17, 2009Dec 23, 2010Soon-Jae YoonAdapter for connecting aerosol valve to pouch of high pressure vessel
USRE30093 *Jan 6, 1978Sep 11, 1979 Aerosol dispensing system
DE1012567B *Mar 22, 1954Jul 18, 1957Risdon Mfg CompEinrichtung zum Zentrieren eines mit einer Spruehdose dicht zu verbindenden Deckels gegenueber der Dosenoeffnung
DE2308315A1 *Feb 20, 1973Aug 29, 1974Ellis M ReynerVerbesserungen bei druckbehaeltern
DE3023583A1 *Jun 24, 1980Feb 12, 1981Coca Cola CoTauchrohr und ventil mit schnelltrennkupplung fuer einen zusammenlegbaren behaelter
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/95, 239/323, 222/386.5, 222/402.25, 222/214, 222/211, 222/518, 53/410
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2231/004, B65D83/62
European ClassificationB65D83/62