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Publication numberUS2671660 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1954
Filing dateJul 12, 1949
Priority dateJul 12, 1949
Publication numberUS 2671660 A, US 2671660A, US-A-2671660, US2671660 A, US2671660A
InventorsGoodwin Hoyle T
Original AssigneeC S I Sales Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grip for golf clubs
US 2671660 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M r 1954 H. T. soonwm' GRIP FOR GOLF cwss 2 Sheeis-Sheet 1 Filed July 12, 1949 Zion 27 Tree/vex! 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 622, flwhxa H. T. GOODWIN GRIP FOR GOLF CLUBS I. M 0 m m J J. 0 .M 0 a, 1 7 0 6 w a a 1 m 1 f 0 K 7 O E I n I O F M a n o a L a 0 4 x 0 .J 7 0 e 7 m 6 3 7 z a a 1 .wwwmwwvwwwvfim. I w 4 2 2 7 Q E w W a 0 6 March 9, 1954 Filed July 12, 1949 Patented Mar. 9, 1954 GRIP FOR GOLF CLUBS Hoyle T. Goodwin, Durham, N. 0., assignor, by mesne assignments, to C. S. I. Sales Company, Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application July 12, 1949, Serial No. 104,227

Claims. 1

This invention relates to improvements in grips for golf club shafts and the like and particularly to an improved grip which can be readily applied to the shaft and which will permit the shaft to be firmly and easily held without turning or slipping. These, therefore, are the general objects of the present invention.

A more specific object of this invention is to provide a grip for a golf club shaft which may be readily manufactured and which may be readily applied to the shaft without the use of a cement between the club shaft and the grip, and which when applied will facilitate the holding of the shaft.

Another object of this invention is to provide a preformed strip of resilient material, such as rubber, which may be wrapped spirally about the shaft of a golf club or the like and which may be so wrapped as to eliminate or avoid the use of an adhesive material between the shaft and the strip and yet which will not slip relative to the shaft when in use.

Another object is to provide a grip for a golf club or the like having the advantages above mentioned, which may be readily used as a replacement for existing grips, and which will be attractive in appearance and provide a satisfactory feel.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become more apparent from the following description reference being made to the accompanying drawings which illustrate preferred examples of the invention. The essential features of the invention will be summarized in the claims.

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a fragmentary view of a golf club shaft having the improved grip of this invention; Fig. 2 is a plan view of the preformed strip of resilient material which forms the improved grip; Fig. 3 is a sectional view of the strip, the plane of the section being indicated by the lines 33 in Fig. 2; Figs. 4 and 5 1 are views, partially in section, illustrating different forms of caps or tip pieces which may be used in connection with the improved grip; Fig. 6 is a view of the club shaft and illustrates the manner in which the winding of the strip is started; Fig. 7 is a fragmentary view of a club shaft and illustrates the manner of winding of the strip as it nears completion; Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 7, illustrating the strip completely wound and ready to be secured in place; Fig. 9 is a bottom view of the strip illustrated in Fig. 2; Fig. 10 is a fragmentary section through the wound shaft, the plane of the section being indicated by the lines Ill-l0 on Fig. 1; Figs. 11 and 12 are fragmentary sections, similar to Fig. 10 but illustrating the application of a decorative or reenforcing winding; Fig. 13 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified form of grip wherein the cap or tip piece is formed integral with the grip itself; Fig. 14 is a sectional detail as indicated by the lines -44 on Fig. 13; Figs. 15 and 16 are sectional views of modified forms of strip; Fig. 17 is a fragmentary plan view of a modified form of strip; and Fig. 18 is a plan view of the strip shown in Fig. 17 tensioned for application to the club shaft.

The invention has been illustrated in the drawings as applied to a conventional steel golf club shaft 20. These shafts are tubular and are tapered, sometimes in graduated section, toward the lower end of the shaft to which a head, not shown, is affixed in the usual manner. Generally the upper end of the tubular shaft is closed by a cap or tip piece 2|.

A conventional cap, shown in Fig. 4, comprises a plug portion 22 which is driven into the open end of the shaft and a button-like tip portion 23 which overlies the top of the shaft and provides a flange 24 against which the grip material is seated.

An improved cap 25, especially adapted for use in the present invention, is shown in Fig. 5. The improved cap comprises a tubular or cup-like portion 26 into which the upper end of the club shaft is inserted, and a cap portion 21 having a downwardly facing flange 28 against which the upper end of the grip is abutted. This cap is made of a resilient material such as rubber or a rubber-like composition and snugly engages the shaft.

The improved grip comprises an elongated preformed strip 30 of rubber or resilient rubberlike material having a surface which, when stretched, provides sufficient friction to assist in retaining the strip on the shaft and provides an outer surface which may be readily gripped and which has a highly satisfactory feel". The strip 30 is preferably molded and is provided with a substantially longitudinal flange 3| which extends the entire length of the strip. The under surface of the flange is contiguous or flush with the under surface of the body portion 32 of the strip. The flange 3| is materially thinner than the body portion 32 of the strip and forms substantially a right angle with the body portion of the strip, as indicated at 33 in Fig. 3.

The bottom of the body portion 32 of the strip 30 is provided with a longitudinal undercut or groove along the longitudinal edge thereof opposite the flange 3|. The dimensions of this groove are identical with those of the flange 3| so that when wrapped about the shaft the groove will overlie the flange and be completely fllled thereby. The outer corners 36 of the flange and the inner corners 31 of the groove are both substantially ninety degrees. Thus when wrapped spirally about the shaft as shown in Figs. 1 and 10 the surfaces 40 and ll of the flange abut the surfaces 42 and 43 respectively of the groove and prevent relative movement of the strip aixally of the shaft 20. The outer corners 41 and 48 of the body portion 32 are rounded and coact to provide a spiral groove 49 when the strip is wound about the shank.

The ends of the body portion 32 of the strip are beveled as shown at 50 and lil. The angle of this bevel is such that when spirally wound about the shaft the beveled surface 5| lies in a plane normal to the axis of the shaft 20 thus enabling it to abut the shoulder 24 or 28 of the cap 20 or 25. The other beveled surface lies in a similar plane so as to facilitate fastening thereof to the shaft as indicated in Figs. '7 and 8.

The flange 3| extends some distance to either end of the body portion 32 as shown. at 6|! and BI. Th end of the flange 3| is comparatively thin, and is wrapped about the shaft as shown in Fig. 6 until the beveled portion 5| engages the flange of the cap whereupon the strip is spirally wound about the shaft atop the end of the flange. The strip is stretched as it is wound so that it tightly engages the shaft and i wound with the groove 35 at the top and the flange 3| toward the bottom of the shaft. Thus the portion of the strip overlaying the flange 3| will retain the strip in position on th shaft. This, together with the abutting edges heretofore mentioned, prevents any creeping or relative movement between the strip and the shaft and avoids the necessity of using cements or adhesives as has been the custom in the past.

When the strip is completely wound the extension 6| of the flange 3| i wound about the shaft and, as indicated in Fig. 8, thereafter wrapped with a band of adhesive tape 10 or bound with twine at its lower end in the usual manner to form a complete grip as shown in Fig.

When the cap or tip 25 of Fig. 5 is used the tensioned strip 3|], when wound about the tubu-= lar portion 26 of the cap, retain the latter in position on the shaft.

In Figs. 13 and is I have shown a modified form of grip. at the leading end of the flange 3| is omitted and a cap portion is moulded integrally with the strip at its leading end. This cap portion includes a cylindrical sleeve portion 56-, adapted to embrace the end of the shaft, and a closing cap portion 61.

In Figs. 15 and 16 I have illustrated embodtments which may be used when a decorated grip is desired. In these embodiments the body portion of the strip is provided with a series of openings or perforations H! which extend through the strip. These perforations are preferably substantially elliptical as shown in Fig. 17, so that when the strip is tensioned during winding, they will become substantially circular, as shown in Fig, 18.

In the form illustrated in Fig. 15 the openings 10 extend through that portion of the strip overlying the groove 35 and are covered by an elongated strip H of rubber or a rubber-like material In this form, the extension Gil Y 4 differing in color from that of the main portion of the strip. In this form the groove 88 is of such depth, that when the strip II is applied. it will be completely filled by the flange 0|. The strip may be secured to the strip 80 either by cement or by vulcanization.

In the form shown in Fig. 16 the strip comprises a body portion II of substantially the same thickness throughout substantially its entire length and provided with openings II which extend therethrough. A second strip of material H of the same width as that of the strip ll but somewhat thinner is secured to the bottom of the strip 13. The stri 14 is ofl'set transversely of the body portion 13, thus providing a tongue Ila and a mating groove Ila. The strip Il may be secured to the stri 18 by vulcanization or by cement, as desired, and is preferably of a contrasting color.

The grip may be decorated by winding 0. thin rubber ribbon II in the groove M as indicated in section in Fig. 11. This ribbon is oi a contrasting color or tone relative to that of the body portion of the strip, thus providing an attraotive grip.

A reenforcing winding 1! may be seated in the spiral groove 40. This winding may be nylon or stranded wire and is wound about the groove under considerable tension so as to reenforce the shaft and increase the adhesion between the shaft and grip.

While I have illustrated and described my improved grip as used in connection with a golf club, it is obvious that it may be used for hand grips for clubs, bats, and implements of various types when a wrapped grip is desirable.

I claim:

1. A handle grip comprising, a single homogeneous longitudinally stretchable elongated strip of stretchable rubber-like material to be spirally wound about a handle and having an elongated flange extending outwardly and along one longitudinal edge thereof, the under surface of said flange being a continuation of the under surface of said strip, said strip having a longitudinally extending recess in its bottom adjacent the edge thereof opposite said flange, the cross sectional area of said flange and recess being substantially identical, the ends of said strip being cut on a bias and each terminating in elongated anchoring portions having a width relatively narrower than the width of the major strip portion and extending generally parallel therewith.

2. In combination with a handle and a headed cap telescopically engaging one end of said handie, a surface grip therefor comprising a single homogeneous, longitudinally stretched strip of rubber-like material having one end overlapping itself closely adjacent the capped end of the handle to anchor the end on the handle and the remaining portion thereof extending spirally about the handle in stretched condition and grasping the handle without the aid of adhesive, said spirally stretched strip having its other end anchored to the handle in spaced relation from the first end, said strip between its ends having a longitudinal flange extending outwardly along one longitudinal edge thereof, the undersurface of said flange being a continuation of the strip under surface, the longitudinal edge of said strip opposite said flange having a longitudinal recess in its bottom of substantially the same cross sectional area as said flange, said recessed longitudinal edge overlying the flanged longitudinal edge on the handle to present a substantially level grip surface throughout its length on said handle.

3. The combination of claim 2, wherein at least said overlapping end of the strip terminates in an elongated portion having a width relatively narrower than the width of the major strip portion, said elongated portion encircling the handle to efifect said overlapping.

4. In combination with a handle, a surface grip therefor comprising a single homogeneous longitudinally stretched strip of rubber-like material having one end anchored on the handle and the remaining portion thereof extending spirally about the handle in stretched condition and grasping the handle without the aid of adhesive, said spirally stretched stri being anchored to the handle at its other end in spaced relation from the first end, said strip having a longitudinal flange extending outwardly along one longitudinal edge thereof, the under surface of said flange being a continutaion of the strip under surface, the longitudinal edge of said strip opposite said flange having a longitudinal recess in its bottom of substantially the same cross sectional area as said flange, said recessed longitudinal edge overlying the flanged longitudinal edge to present a substantial level grip surface throughout its length on said handle, the ends of the strip being cut on a bias and at least said one end terminating in an elongated strip extending beyond the major portion of the strip at one end thereof and encircling the handle to anchor the strip thereto at said one end.

5. A handle grip comprising a single homogeneous longitudinally stretchable elongated strip of stretchable rubber-like material to be spirally wound about a handle and having an elongated flange extending outwardly and along one longitudinal edge thereof, the under surface of said flange being a continuation of the under surface of said strip, said strip having a longitudinally extending recess in its bottom adjacent the edge thereof opposite said flange, the cross sectional area of said flange and recess being substantially identical, the ends of said strip being formed on a bias and at least one of said ends terminating in an elongated anchoring portion having a width relatively narrower than the width of the major strip portion and extending generally parallel therewith.

HOYLE T. GOODWIN.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,556,781 Gjorup Oct. 13, 1925 1,968,064 Young July 31, 1934 2,171,382 Wettlaufer Aug. 29, 1939 2,339,121 Van Cleef Jan. 11, 1944 2,459,996 Duncan Jan. 25, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 12,661 Great Britain 1904 217,272 Great Britain June 16, 1924 443,228 Gerat Britain Feb. 24, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1556781 *Apr 19, 1923Oct 13, 1925Louis HansenResilient grip
US1968064 *May 9, 1932Jul 31, 1934Young Lconard AGrip for golf clubs and the like
US2171382 *Sep 8, 1938Aug 29, 1939Wettlaufer William LGolf club grip and method of making the same
US2339121 *Mar 25, 1940Jan 11, 1944Cleef Bros VanManufacture of golf club grips
US2459996 *Jul 30, 1946Jan 25, 1949Duncan Jr Thomas PGolf club grip
GB217272A * Title not available
GB443228A * Title not available
GB190412661A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2772090 *Aug 27, 1952Nov 27, 1956Spalding A G & Bros IncLightweight grip
US3028283 *Mar 14, 1956Apr 3, 1962Macgregor Sport Products IncMethod of making golf club grip
US3140873 *Nov 15, 1960Jul 14, 1964Goodwin Mfg & Dev Company IncGrooved golf club handle sleeve and stretchable insert to fill said groove
US3252706 *Oct 22, 1962May 24, 1966Rosasco Sr NatGolf club handgrip
US3845954 *Dec 26, 1973Nov 5, 1974G CaseRacket with disposable hand grip
US4015851 *Feb 9, 1976Apr 5, 1977Elastomeric Products Inc.Rubber grip for tennis racket handles
US4476742 *May 19, 1981Oct 16, 1984Midgley Noel HHand grip
US5846629 *May 31, 1996Dec 8, 1998Lord CorporationCushioning handle wrap for isolating vibration
US7186189 *Jul 1, 2005Mar 6, 2007Ben HuangPanel grip with modified seam
US7195568Apr 19, 2004Mar 27, 2007Ben HuangGolf club handle grip
US7344448Apr 28, 2006Mar 18, 2008Ben HuangGolf club handle grip
US7347792May 22, 2006Mar 25, 2008Ben HuangDecorative golf club grip
US7404770May 3, 2006Jul 29, 2008Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7448957May 3, 2006Nov 11, 2008Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US7448958May 3, 2006Nov 11, 2008Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US7491133May 3, 2006Feb 17, 2009Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7527564May 18, 2005May 5, 2009Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US7566375May 3, 2006Jul 28, 2009Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US7770321Mar 10, 2008Aug 10, 2010Ben HuangFishing pole grip
US7862445Mar 21, 2007Jan 4, 2011Ben HuangGrip having a stabilized gripping surface
US7862446Aug 14, 2007Jan 4, 2011Ben HuangGrip having a varied gripping surface
US7980961Mar 5, 2007Jul 19, 2011Ben HuangPanel grip with modified seam
US7985314May 19, 2008Jul 26, 2011Ben HuangMethod of making an all-weather grip
US8003171Mar 25, 2008Aug 23, 2011Ben HuangDecorative golf club grip
US8123627Dec 3, 2010Feb 28, 2012Ben HuangSingle panel golf club grip
US8201357Jul 30, 2010Jun 19, 2012Ben HuangFishing pole grip
US8360898Apr 26, 2010Jan 29, 2013Ben HuangGrip
US8424236Apr 2, 2010Apr 23, 2013Ben HuangMulti-layered grip for use with fishing poles
US8435133Jul 28, 2009May 7, 2013Ben HuangPanel grip with cut-outs and inserts
US8480510Aug 24, 2010Jul 9, 2013Ben HuangSleeve member for use in golf club grips and the like
US8499487Jun 18, 2012Aug 6, 2013Ben HuangFishing pole grip
US8518505Apr 2, 2010Aug 27, 2013Ben HuangMulti-layered grip
US8617664Aug 11, 2011Dec 31, 2013Ben HuangMulti-polymer grip member
US8727904May 22, 2012May 20, 2014La Vay Sports Technologies, LLCGolf club shaft grip
US8734267Jun 28, 2013May 27, 2014Ben HuangSleeve member for use in golf club grips and the like
US20120100927 *Apr 8, 2009Apr 26, 2012Martin John LenziniInhibiting vibration in sports equipment and hand tools
WO1981003284A1 *May 19, 1981Nov 26, 1981N MidgleyHand grip
WO1991011223A1 *Mar 7, 1990Aug 8, 1991Spirale Di Alberti Ermanno & CSpiral band covering, thinner at the edges, for tennis racquet handles
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/302
International ClassificationA63B53/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/14
European ClassificationA63B53/14