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Publication numberUS2671731 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1954
Filing dateApr 12, 1950
Priority dateApr 12, 1950
Publication numberUS 2671731 A, US 2671731A, US-A-2671731, US2671731 A, US2671731A
InventorsVogt Clarence W
Original AssigneeVogt Clarence W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Commodity package
US 2671731 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 9, 1954 c w, VOGT COMMODITY PACKAGE Filed April 12, 1950 Patented Mar. 9, 1954 COMMODITY PACKAGE Clarence W. Vogt, Nor-walk, Conn.

Application April 12, 1950, Serial No. 155,401

5 Claims.

This invention relates to improved packages and in particular to a sealed package especially useful for perishable commodities which are deformablefsuch as food products and the like in a plastic state.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a package which furnishes protection, particularly against deterioration of the contents and against deformation of a crushable commodity during handling and distribution. An important feature is the provision of a package, which is designed and arranged to furnish protection to the commodity until opened by the ultimate consumer.

Another object is to provide a package with a sealing closure to protect against contamination or deterioration of the contents, and against tampering, infestation, and the like.

A further object is to provide a sealed package having means for facilitating access to the 4 package in a convenient and readily noticeable manner and without the need for tools, such as a knife or scissors or the like.

Another object is to provide a wrapped package which may be sealed by an additional element may be a subdivision of a multiple-unit or composite package to facilitate handling and display in a group, but with the individual units thereof readily separable for sale and without destruction or wastage of portions of the packaging material, or without decreasing the protection afforded the commodity.

Another object is to provide a wrapped and sealed package having the requisite impervious- .ness and rigidity but which may be simply and readily made at low cost.

'Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, accompanied by the drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a completed unit package embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar perspective viewof an object partially enclosed in a wrapper to illustrate how the package shown in Fig. 1 may be made;

Fig. 3 is another perspective view illustrating another step in the formation of the package;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of the wrapped package in condition for the application of the sealing closure;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged elevatlonal view showing a detail in the operation of applying the sealing closure, and

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary perspective view of a composite package illustrating an assembly of a plurality of individual or unit packages.

In the packaging of perishable edible commodities such as butter, margarine, cheese and the like for the retail market, it has been found that there is a growing trend toward sales of the commodity in small unit packages. By way of illustration, butter is generally sold in wrapped and cartoned pound blocks or units, and in quarterpound blocks wrapped individually and then overwrapped or cartoned in assemblies of four. Surveys of self-service markets in urban communities indicate that, by a large preponderance, sales are of less than four quarter-pound wrapped units at a time, in spite of the fact that the price per pound for butter purchased in this manner may be appreciably higher. To accommodate this business, the retailer breaks open the conventional pound package including four quarter-pound packages wrapped or cartoned together so that the quarter-pound packages may be displayed and dispensed singly. Since the conventional wrapping for the quarter-pound packages is of parchment paper, a great deal of protection is lost bythe removal of the overwrapping or carton. The parchment wrapper while having excellent wet-strength and grease-proof properties, is relatively pervious to water, vapors, odors, light, etc., and a commodity such as butter, wrapped only in parchment, is subject to deterioration. The quality of the commodity may be sufficiently impaired to decrease its value or render it unfit for sale. In addition it is extremely time consuming and wasteful for the retailer to break open and discard the outer covering.

The present invention obviates the above objections, providing a wrapped package for the desired smaller units of the commodity, with greatly increased protection. By the use of an appropriate sealing element arranged so that it does not interfere with the display of the wrapped commodity, a sealed tamper-proof package results, and as will be described, such a package may be combined with a plurality of other similar packages, forming a composite or multipleunit assembly of packages. This multiple-unit may be readily handled by the retailer and placed for display without removing any material. Purchasers may readily separate the desired number of units, and when separated, each unit may comprise a sanitary sealed package which protects the contents until opened by the consumer.

Also, the sealing element may be arranged so that it facilitates access to the package.

The wrapper for a package embodying the present invention may be fabricated of any suitable sheet material having suificient flexibility to permit its being enfolded to enclose the object or commodity. To obtain maximum protection consistent with the production of a sealed package, it is desirable that the sheet material afford a relatively impervious barrier against the transmission therethrough of moisture, vapors, light, odors and the like, which may adversely affect the composition or physical characteristics of the commodity. The selection of suitable sheet material will generally depend on the commodity being packaged. In the case of butter, for example, it is desirable that the sheet material have an inner surface similar in its properties to parchment paper. That is, it should have relatively high wet-strength and be resistant to grease. It is also advantageous that it not adhere too strongly to the commodity.

To provide an attractive appearance for the finished package, the exterior surface of the sheet material should have good printability so that advertising and designs placed thereon are decorative and attractive, and display the package and its contents to best advantage. In many cases a single material will not furnish the desired combination of properties and for this reason it is often preferable to utilize a laminated sheet material having two or more plies. By way of illustration, for packaging butter and margarine an inner ply such as light weight parchment paper may be selected and laminated to an outer ply selected to provide excellent printability. The outer ply may be a waxed paper having a high surface sheen or gloss to display the printing, or may be a trans arent or translucent material such as cellophane, cellulose acetate, or other film. When a transparent sheet material is used, the printed matter may be applied, in reverse, to the inside surface of the material so that it will show through.

The outer ply may be a heavier weight of stock than the inner ply to provide some structural strength for the package. The laminant utilized to bond the plies to ether, may be such that it will add to the imperviou ness of the wrapper. For example, a wax or wax composition or a resinous material will securely hold the plies together and at the same time be an excellent barrier. The lamination of the plies will add to the stiffness or rigidity of the wrapper, and in some cases the desired stiffness may be obtained by lam nating sheet materials which in them elves would not have sufficient rigidity. Obviously, a large number of variables will enter into the selection of an appro riate sheet material for the wrapper and it is intended that the above description will serve to illustrate some of these aspects.

For purposes of the present description, the object or commodity to be packa ed is illustrated as a prismatic object having a rectangular or square cross section similar to a quarter-pound print of butter or margarine. Many other shapes or forms of commodity and many other commodities may be packaged to advantage in packages embodying the present invention. Further, the contents may include more than a single obiect such as for example a pair of triangular obiects or an object which has been severed into slices or patties.

The object or commodity may be suitably disposed on the sheet material wrapper, indicated generally in the drawings by the letter W, and as shown in Fig. 2 the wrapper may be folded to tubular configuration about the object. Opposite marginal edge portions l of the wrappers may meet or overlap to form a seam 2 extending longitudinally along a face of the finished package. It is preferable that the face of the package bearing the seam 2 becomes the bottom of the package in its finished form, although it will he understood that other faces of the package may serve as the bottom.

After the wrapper has been folded to tubular configuration, edge or end fold portions indicated by the numeral 3, which extend beyond the end of the object may be suitably end folded onto the end faces of the object to close the wrapped package. The formation of the end folds may be accomplished by conventional mechanism but to provide the desired sealing closure it is pref erable that the folds be made as indicated in the drawing. In Fig. 2 the object is shown in an inverted position, that is with the normal bottom facing upwardly, to illustrate a method of forming the package. The first end folds may be made in the direction indicated by the arrow A and will be the folding of the bottom end folds. The side end folds may be made in the direction indicated by the arrows B and the sequence of these folds is a matter of choice or may depend on the apparatus which forms the folds. The last end folds, namely the top end folds, made in the direction indicated by the arrow C, are preferably made in conjunction with the sealing closure. Accordingly, at this stage of the formation of the package, these end folds may project generally outwardly and may even be caused to project downwardly from the balance of the package as best illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5. These top end folds are numbered 1 and may be termed flaps.

With the package in this condition a sealing element or strip may be applied to the partially wrapped package. A preferred form of sealing strip comprises a central portion 4 and end portions 5. The central portion 4 of the sealing strip is applied to and covers the face of the package bearing the longitudinally extending seam 2, while the end portions 5 of the sealing strip are angularly disposed with respect to the central portions, and cover the end faces of the package. The interior surface of the sealing strip may be provided with or have applied thereto a coating of suitable adhesive material which may partially or completely cover such surface. In this way the sealing strip adheres to and seals the three adjacent faces of the package containing the fold portions of the wrapper, where there are openings leading to the contents. The sealing strip is preferably of approximately the same width as the wrapped package. It is also desirable that the end portions 5 of the sealing strip be of a slightly greater extent than the end faces of the package at least in the direction extending from the bottom to the top of the package. Thus, when the sealing strip is applied, its free edges indicated by the numeral 6 will extend slightly beyond the top side faces of the package (see Fig. 5) to furnish protection as will be described.

The sealing strip is applied and may be adhered to the wrapped package while the top end folds or flaps l are projecting from the package in the position shown in Fig. 4. The final closure comprises the folding of the top end folds onto the outer surfaces of the end portions 5 of the sealing strip. Since the edges 6 of the sealing strip are preferably of slightly greater extent than the end faces of the package, the top end fold will be slightly bowed around such free edges, as may best be seen in Fig. 5. The top end fold may then be adhered to the sealing strip by an adhesive material which may be disposed on the end portions of the sealing strip or may be applied to the top end folds I prior to their being overlapped onto the sealing strip. It is also contemplated that if the wrapper is a laminated sheet material, the application of heat to the top end fold may cause the laminant to flow from the free edges of the wrapper along the top end folds I, in the location indicated by the numeral 8, to adequately adhere the top end fold to the sealing strip. In the particular form of the invention shown, since the object or commodity is a square, the free edges of the wrapper in the location of the numeral 8 are approximately abutting. However, if the object is slightly rectangular having greater width than height, the free edges of the wrapper in the area 8 will be slightly spaced exposing the interior surface of the wrapper. In this event, such interior surface may be provided with an adhesive area to facilitate adhering portions of the top end fold to the sealing strip. The flap may be readily gripped for opening if edge portions thereof are unadhered.

The sealing strip or element may be fabricated of a suitable sheet material having the desired weight and rigidity. A relatively light flexible sheet may be utilized, but it is believed preferable to employ a heavier and more rigid sheet material so as to furnish structural strength for the completed package. When the sealing strip is in place on the finished package as shown in Fig. 1 it is channel-shaped and if made of a suitable tag board, cardboard or the like, it will provide a great deal of protection for the packaged contents.

The interior surface of the sealing strip or element may be partially or completely coated with a suitable adhesive material. The adhesive may be of any desired type which will adhere to the wrapped package with sufficient strength to securely seal the same. For example, a wax coating may be utilized, or a suitable thermoplastic adhesive material, or a gum type of adhesive activated by water or moisture, or even a pressure-sensitive adhesive material. It is desirable to utilize an adhesive having good peeling properties so that it will not be difficult for the consumer to remove the sealing strip and gain access to the contents. A pressure-sensitive adhesive material is especially desirable since it may be re-used after opening of the package to reseal the package and the balance of the contents. It is also believed advisable that the free edges 6 of the sealing strip be uncoated for a slight distance along its interior surface to facilitate gripping the sealing strip to peel it from the package after the top end fold of flap I has been lifted. To open the package the consumer merely grips an unstuck edge of a top end fold or flap, which is preferably not adhered to the sealing strip at that point, and lifts it to permit access to a portion of the free edge 6 of the sealing strip. The sealing strip is then peeled from the wrapper and if the package during these operations is inverted so that it rests on its top surface the marginal edges l of the wrapper forming theseam 2 are accessible and may be readily opened.

The completed package embodying the present invention as illustrated in Fig. 1 may be readily combined with a plurality of similar packages to provide a multiple unit or composite assembly of individual packages. It is desirable that the individual packages be connected together to provide a composite assembly which may be handled as a single package. This interconnection may be readily accomplished by utilizing a sealing strip dimensioned to accommodate the desired number of individual packages. It is preferable that the common boundary between the sealing strips for the individual packages be weakened to facilitate separation. For example, such common boundaries may be cut-scored or otherwise weakened in advance both along the common boundary between adjacent central portions 4 and along the common boundary between adjacent end portions 5. When the sealing strip is a relatively rigid sheet material it is believed preferable to weaken by skip-slitting along the common boundary leaving the desired number of integral lands or connecting portions indicated by the numerals 9 and [0 in Fig. 6. After the unit has been separated or removed from the composite assembly by breaking or tearing of the connecting portions, the edges of the sealing strip will bear some portion of the fractured connecting portions (see Figs. 1 and 6). It will be appreciated that by suitably weakening the line of connection between adjacent sealing strips, the edges resulting from tearing or fracturing the connecting portions 9 and I 0 will not be suffic'iently rough or uneven to detract from the appearance of the packages. The weakening between adjacent sealing strips may be accomplished in such a way that separation will not be diflicult and yet there will be adequate strength to handle the composite package prior to separation. If desired, the connecting portions 9 and I0 may be partially weakened by scoring or the like to facilitate a smooth edge when the unit packages are separated.

It is alsoconsidered advantageous t skip-slit along the line of connection between adjacent sealing strips so that each end portion 5 of the sealing strip of each unit package will be provided with a suitably shaped tab H to assist in gripping the end portion of the sealing strip when opening the package. The formation of the tabs II will obviously result in a complementary shaped recess or cutout in the edge of the adjacent sealing strip, as shown in Figs. 1 and 6. For convenience, opposite ends of the unit packages may have the tabs H projecting from opposite sides.

Individual units may be readily separated from the composite article by gripping the unit package at an end of the composite article and bending it downwardly and away from the balance of the units to separate the end portions 5 of adjacent sealing strips by fracturing the connecting portions 9 as shown at the right hand side of Fig. 6. Pulling the partially separated unit package at an angle with respect to the adjacent package will readily disconnect the central portions 4 of adjacent sealing strips, by fracturing connecting portions I 0, tocomplete the separation of the unit package.

The multiple unit or composite package illustrated in Fig. 6 may be readily made by folding the wrappers around a plurality of objects until they have reached the condition illustrated in Fig. 4. The desired number of unit packages in this condition may be assembled and a multiple 7 length sealing strip applied collectively to the assembly while it is in the form of a flat sheet. After the central portions 4 of the sealing strip have been applied, the end portions 5 may then be formed onto the ends of the unit packages. The weakening of the sealing strips along their common boundaries between adjacent unit sealing strips may be accomplished in advance and if the sealing strips are made of a relatively rigid material the fold lines between the central portions 4 and the end portions 5 may be pre-scored to facilitate assembly. With the objects of approximately uniform weight and size collectively held in contiguous relation a multiple width sealing strip may be assembled thereto and the weakened common boundaries will be located at the appropriate positions between unit packages.

The design and arrangement of the sealing strip, as described, is very advantageous in that it affords a closed and sealed package and furnishes structural strength for the package. By utilizing a sealing strip of slightly greater extent than the height of the end face of the package as shown in Fig. 5, protection against deformation or crushing is afforded to the contents when the packages are stacked one upon the other, such as in a shipping box. At the same time, a large reduction in the amount of material required is effected as compared to a carton or overwrap, and of course this results in a lower cost of the completed package. Furthermore, since the sealing strip is applied to and covers only the end and bottom faces of the wrapped package, it does not interfere with the printed matter located on the side and top faces of the wrapper.

An extremely advantageous package for plastic materials, such as butter and margarine, may be produced by enwrapping the butter in a relatively impervious wrapper and sealing the same with a semi-rigid or relatively rigid sealing strip. To enhance the appearance of the package, it is believed desirable that the printing and other art work on the wrapper be registered with respect to the panels or faces of the completed package. This may be done by printing the wrappers so that the printed matter is accurately registered with respect to the edges of the wrapper, and at the same time any adhesive patterns, score lines or the like may be incorporated in the sheet material, in registry with the edges of the wrapper, prior to formation of the package. The sheet material from which the enwrapments are fabricated may then be cut to a size corresponding to one or more of the objects to be packaged and by forming the wrappers to provide an open receiving channel a corner edge of the object may be deposited therein so that the object is accurately located with respect to the edges of the wrapper. In this way, the printed matter, etc., will be registered with respect to the object. This feature is more fully disclosed in my copending application, Serial Number 139,845, filed January 21, 1950, and entitled Enwrapments and Use of Same.

The closure construction illustrated in the drawings results in a protective and useful package. The sealing strip provides a closed package which protects the contents from deterioration, infestation, tampering or unsanitary conditions. At the same time, the package is easy to open. The end folds or flaps I overlapped onto the edge of and at least partially adhered to the sealing strip indicate to the consumer how the package may be opened. After the flap has been lifted, the tab H of the sealing strip may be readily grasped to peel the sealing strip from the wrapper. If desired, the overlapped flap I may be provided at only one end of the package, but it is believed preferable that it be overlapped at both ends. This results in uniform appearance and also the flap overlaps and conceals the raw top edge of the sealing strip. It is considered desirable in package construction to cover and conceal such exposed edges, whenever practicable.

Since the sealing strip may cover, adhere to and seal the longitudinal seam and end folds of the wrapped object it is not necessary that the seam and endfolds of the wrapper be completely closed. For example, with laminated sheet material used as a wrapper, it may be seen that if the endfolds extending from opposite faces are overlapped the plurality of thicknesses will cause bulky endfolds which detract from the neatness and appearance of the package. It is contemplated that the end fold portions of the wrapper may be shortened and even though the wrapper does not completely close the end faces of the object, the sealing strip will provide a closed sealed package with protection for the contents.

A composite package comprising multiple units of 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 or other desired number of units, may comprise layers to be disposed in suitable shipping containers Where the packages must be shipped for long distances. When the packages reach the retailer, it is only necessary to remove the multiple unit packages and place them on display. The composite package does not include any packaging material for the retailer to remove and destroy and wastage of packaging material is obviated. The consumer may easily remove the desired number of units from the multiple unit package. It may also be seen that the protective packaging is afforded to the commodity until the package is opened by the consumer. The sealing of the packages insures against deterioration or contamination and maintains the wrapped commodity in sanitary condition.

It will be appreciated that in the drawings, proportions have been exaggerated in some instances to provide a greater understanding of the invention.

It will be understood that the foregoing description of preferred embodiments of the invention is for the purpose of explanation and illustration and numerous variations and modifications other than those which have been described may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A package for food products which comprises a relatively flexible Wrapper enfolded about the contents, two opposite edges of said wrapper forming a seam extending longitudinally along one face of the package, end fold portions of said wrapper disposed against opposite end faces of said package, a sealing element having a central portion sealing the face of said package bearing the longitudinally extending seam, and end portions of said element sealing said opposite end faces of said package, one of the end fold portions of said wrapper being formed as a flap and overlapped and adhered to the outer face of an end portion of said sealing element.

2. A package in accordance with claim 1 above, in which the end edges of said sealing element project beyond the end faces of said package and wherein the overlapped flap extends over the adjacent projecting edge of the sealing element, the sealing element being of relatively rigid material to protect said mass when a plurality of said packages are stacked upon each other.

3. A package in accordance with claim 1, in which said sealing element is of substantially the same width as said package with a projecting tab to facilitate gripping the sealing element to peel it from the package.

4. A package, according to claim 1, in which the end edges of said sealing element project beyond the end faces of said package and wherein one of the end fold portions at each end of the wrapper is formed as a flap and overlapped and adhered to the outer face of an end portion of the sealing element, the overlapped fiaps extending over the adjacent projecting edge of the sealing element, the sealing element being of relatively rigid material to protect the mass when a plurality of said packages are stacked upon each other.

5. A composite package which comprises a plurality of rectangular prismatic objects each,

having a wrapper extending about the top, sides and bottom faces thereof with a seam extending along said bottom, end portions of each of said wrappers being end folded against the end faces of said objects from the side and bottom faces of said objects, a multi-unit sealing element adhered to the bottom and end faces of said seam and end faces, and end portions of said wrappers end folded from the top faces of said objects and adhered to the outer face of said multiunit sealing element, said sealing element being weakened along the line of connection between adjacent objects whereby said objects may be separated from said composite package as individual sealed unit packages.

CLARENCE W. VOGT.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,567,165 Noland Dec. 29, 1925 1,578,066 Bolingbroke Mar. 23, 1926 2,077,300 Abrams et al Apr. 13, 1937 2,263,835 Atkinson Nov. 25, 1941 2,408,616 Eldredge Oct. 1, 1946 2,448,795 Grecco Sept. 7, 1948 2,456,059 Grupe Dec. 14, 1948 2,467,875 Andrews Apr. 19, 1949

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2961322 *Feb 1, 1957Nov 22, 1960Alexander WinterbergMethod of preserving perishable foodstuffs
US3015386 *Oct 12, 1959Jan 2, 1962Vogt Clarence WPackaging fluent products
US3100711 *Jul 18, 1958Aug 13, 1963Eisler PaulFood package
US3168193 *Aug 20, 1962Feb 2, 1965Phillips Petroleum CoFormed container multipack
US3189175 *Sep 17, 1962Jun 15, 1965Int Paper CoBrick packaging device and method
US4007285 *Sep 19, 1974Feb 8, 1977Dun-Hot, Inc.Popcorn container and handle assembly
US4666079 *Mar 10, 1986May 19, 1987Sig Schweizerische Industrie-GesellschaftPacking for flat, rectangular products and method
US4971197 *Dec 6, 1989Nov 20, 1990Eveready Battery Company, Inc.Battery package
US8348053Aug 2, 2010Jan 8, 2013Philip Morris Usa Inc.Adjacent article package for consumer products
US20110083980 *Oct 9, 2009Apr 14, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Snus foil pack in side opening hard pack
DE202009016721U1 *Dec 8, 2009Apr 21, 2011Bischof + Klein Gmbh & Co. KgTeilbarer Verpackungsbeutel aus Kunststofffolie
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/108, 426/115, 426/130, 229/120.12, 229/87.8
International ClassificationB65D75/52, B65D71/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/0085, B65D75/527
European ClassificationB65D71/00F, B65D75/52H