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Publication numberUS2672066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 16, 1954
Filing dateAug 18, 1951
Priority dateAug 18, 1951
Publication numberUS 2672066 A, US 2672066A, US-A-2672066, US2672066 A, US2672066A
InventorsPaul W Sandrock, George C Fratz
Original AssigneeKipton Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tool handle attachment
US 2672066 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1954 P. w. SANDROCK ET AL 2,672,066 TOOL HANDLE ATTACHMENT Filed Aug. 18, 1951 VIA-11% 'fdFaE c 76422 3 BY Patented Mar. 16, 1954 TOOL HANDLE ATTACHMENT Paul W. Sandrock and George C. Fratz, Kipton,

Ohio, assignors toKipton Industries, Inc., Kipton, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application August 18, 1951, Serial No. 242,543

3 Claims.

This invention relates to a tool handle attachment with the aid of which increased manipulative force may safely be applied to a tool handle by an auxiliary device of conventional construction. a Heretofore, screw driver handles have been available incorporating cylindrical inserts designed to receive a square shank of a conventional ratchet head. An insert of this kind is described in copending application Serial No.

153,194, filed March 31, 1950, now Patent Number 2,620,001, for Tool Handle. It consists of a sleeve-like element having therein one or more interiorly located segmental shoulders acting as self-contained detent means for coaction with the ball detent incorporated in the shank of the ratchet head. 1 With such inserts can of course be used any other type of auxiliary 'devicethat has a square shank of proper size, particularly if it is equipped with asuitably located ball detent.

However, unless an auxiliary device so equipped happens to be at hand, the user is unable to take full'advantage of the factthat the tool is adapted for use in conjunction with a device for applying increased manipulative force to the tool handle.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an attachment fitting into inserts of the type'de'scribed with the aidoi which increased manipulative-force may be applied to the tool handle by a standard socket wrench, a Stillson wrench,=a pair of pliers, or any similar auxiliary device that lacks the square shank of the conventional ratchet head, all without necessitating the application of such auxiliary device to the tool handle itself. It is a further object of. the invention to provide an attachment of the type described that will not project laterally beyond the tool handle itself to interfere with the means usually provided for limiting or preventing rolling of the tool when in contact with a'fiat surface. It is'a further object of the invention to provide atool handle attachment of. built-up construction that is susceptible ofbeing as-' sernbled with ease from parts that can be turned lows and from the accompanying drawings, in

which Figure 1 is a full-scale side elevation of a screw driver with the tool handle attachment of n the present invention applied to it, the socket wrench shownin dotted lines being representative of the type of auxiliary device that'may be used withsuch'attachment; Figure 2 .is aside elevation of the tool handle attachment shown in Figure 1, the same being shown as'it appears when removed from the tool handle with which it is used; Figure 3 is a vertical central section of such tool handle attachment; Figure 4 is an exploded view of the parts of the tool handle attachment before they are assembled, the various parts being shown in section; Figure 5 is a plan of one of the spacer washers used in the tool handle attachment; Figure 6 is a plan of one of the gripping washers; Figure '7 is a top plan of the shank to which the gripping and spacer washers are applied; Figure 8 is a bottom plan of the same shank; Figure 9 is a top plan of the assembled tool handle attachment; and Figure 10 is a bottom plan of the assembled tool handle attachment. Figures 2 to 10, inclusive, are all on a somewhat enlarged scale as compared with that of Figure 1.

As is apparent from Figure 1, tool handle at-.- tachment A fits into the end of tool handle B. The latter is recessed to permit it to take a metal insert of the kind shown, described and claimed in application Serial No. 153,194, new Patent Number 2,620,001. Such an insert has a square opening terminating in a plurality of transversely extending segmental shoulders that hold tool handle attachment A in position by engaging the ball detent with which the tool handle attachment is equipped. A socket wrench C is shown in dotted lines, such socket wrench being representative of a variety of auxiliary devices that can be used with the tool handle attachmentof the invention.

Tool'handle attachment A is shown to better advantage in Figures 2 and 3. Built up of metal components, it includes a shank I which is coextensive in length with the attachment itself. Such shank is made from square bar stock, preferably /5 inch by inch in cross section, this in order that it may be used wherever one may use a ratchet head provided with a shank oflike dimensions. As indicated in Figure 4, shank I has a block-like portion 2 adapted for entry into the recess in the tool handle insert, such block-like portion being equipped with a spring-pressed ball detent 3.

Surmounting block 2 and integral with it is a more or less polygonal stud 4. The generally polygonal shape of stud 4 may be imparted to it in an automatic screw machine by rounding corners 5 of shank I above the upper limits of block 2. By giving stud A a rounded contour, which is accomplished as stated byv rounding off corners '5, transversely extending shoulders 1i are formed in the plane wherein stud 4 meets blocl: 2. Shoulders B may therefore be considered as dividing shank I into two parts, one on one side of shoulders E5 having the characteristics of a block and the other, on the opposite side, having the characteristics of a stud. The axial length of stud 4 may be less than, equal to, or greater than that of block 2, as may be desired in a given case.

To stud i may then be applied one or more gripping washers H, the same being preferably formed by a stamping operation .from inch metal stock. The number of gripping washers II is dependent on the thickness of the stock and the needs of the situation, but in cases wherein {a inch stock is used three such washers, superimposed one upon another, may be conveniently employed. Each washer has a central opening E2 (Figure 6) corresponding generally to but slightly larger than the transverse cross section of :stud i on shank 1. Opening l2 may conveniently take the form of an octagon as shown, hut the precise shape is unimportant so long as there is no mutual interference, as at the corners, between washers ii and stud it.

As further shown in Figure 6, each gripping washer ii is provided at its periphery with a plurality of gripping portions. Preferably, but not necessarily, such gripping portions take the form of triangular serratons [3 of suitable size, shape and number. Where two or more serrated gripping washers are mounted on stud t, the serrations are preferably aligned to form longitudinally extending grooves in the edges of the gripping Washer assembly. if (as may be desired) no spacer washers are used therewith, the first gripping washer H to be applied to stud i will come to rest against shoulders 6; subsequently applied gripping Washers will be supported by it, the last of them at approximately the level, but usually very slightly below the level, of the extreme upper end of stud 4. For some purposes it is sufficient if all of the washers take the form of gripping washers, but it is practicable and sometimes desirable to flank the gripping wash-er or washers H by spacer washers, such spacer washers, designated i l, being shown in Figure '5.

Each spacer washer id is preferably of V inch -etal stock. tral opening it and a smooth (non-serrated) circular periphery it. The opening in-spacer Washer H5 is similar in size and shape to opening l2 in gripping washer H, having, like the latter, a more or less polygonal shape. ers M, where used, need not necessarily fit so closely to stud 4 as do gripping washers H, which are to carry the stresses; consequently, the openings in spacer washers i i may be slightly larger than the openings in gripping washers H. In the preferred form of the invention shown in Figures 2 and 3, two spacer washers are employed, the first, designated i a, being in contact with shoulders t and the second in proximity to the end of stud t. In the construction shown, the height of the washer stack is just short of the length of stud :i; this so as to leave at the upper end of stud (l a projecting portion 1?! which may be headed over to hold the washer stack to shank In one entirely practicable form of the invention, the various washers are held to shank l in the manner above described by heading over the end of the shank I into contact with the washer farthest from the shoulders separating block 2 It is provided as shown with a cen- Spacer washi iii) from stud 4; however, other forms which the invention can take may, if desired, employ a me tallic bond, such as that formed by silver solder or some other suitable material of a similar nature.

If silver solder or the like is used to hold the parts together, the solder is introduced, together with the flux, at or near the surfaces to be bonded together, after which the solder is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause it to melt and flow into the interstices between the parts. In a closely related form of the invention, shank l. gripping washers H and spacer washers I ia and lit are coated with copper, which may be deposited on them in conventional fashion from a solution of an inorganic copper salt, then assembled together without the use or application of any flux, and then brazed together by exposing the assembly as a whole to elevated temperatures in a reducing atmosphere. In the preferred form of the invention, the parts are first coppercoa -ted as above described, then brought togather, then formed into a unitary assembly by heading over (staking) the of shank l, and finally hydrogen-brazed to introduce a metallic bend. Other methods of uniting the washers to the shank are available, som making use of metallic bonds and others making use of mechanical means for holding the parts together. The result of the foregoing operations is to provide a built-up tool handle attachment which, being unitary, operates as if it were integrally formed, by casting or by machining it from a somewhat larger Work piece. However, as compared with cast or machined tool handle attach m'en'ts, it has the advantage that a minor crack in the shank presents no especial problem, this for the reason that the greater part of the load is carried by the washers; By-c-ontrast, in a cast or machined tool handle attachment, a minor crack in the stock tends to spread to the portion in which the serrations are formed, resulting in breakage in this portion. The advantages so provided by a built-up tool handle attachment are important from a practical standpoint.

The materials of which the parts are formed may vary widely but can be of a. suitable ferrous alloy such as mild steel. A non-ferrous alloy, of which beryllium-copper is an example, may be used instead. If desired, the parts of the assembly and even the assembly itself may be chromium plated; however, the use of a rust-resistant steel such as Stainless Steel 1843 is preferred, if there is a possibility of rusting, in-view of the nature of the stresses to which the attachment is subjected in use. If the parts are copper-coated and hydrogombraaed as above described, the hydrogen-brazing step will itself give a bright, attractive finish to the metal.

The make-up, dimensions and proportions of the tool handle attachment may be varied within wide limits. In a typical case, using a shank of bar stock measuring inch by /8 inch, three gripping washers of h inch stock, and two spacer washers of inch stock, a suitable tool handle attachment may be made from a shank measuring approximately 28 mm. in length before heading over. such case, block 2 would measure about 19 mm. or perhaps slightly more than 10 mm. 'in'length. Stud 4 before heading over would measure from 1'2 to 13 mm. in length. Gripping washers "H would measure in diameter about 25 mm. overall and, from the base of one serration to the lease of the nearest serration on the opposite side, about 23 mm, in which case each serration would have altitude of about 1 mm. Twentyfour serrations may advantageously be used, although a greater or lesser number may be used if desired. Spacer washers I4 may conveniently have a diameter of about mm, although they may be greater or less so long as they do not interfere with the function of the serrations on gripping washers I I. Using a tool handle of typical size; e. g., 28 mm., the tool handle attachment will not ordinarily come into contact with or roll on a flat surface on which the tool handle may be placed.

Obviously, changes within the scope of the invention may be made by those skilled in the art, such changes going, for example, to the shape, proportion and materials used in block 2, stud 4, gripping washers H and spacer washers M. The assembled tool handle attachment may be applied to a tool handle of any kind that is equipped with an insert of the kind shown in Figure 1, whether the tool carried by the tool handle be a screw driver, awl, auger bit, or the like. The auxiliary device for applying power to the tool handle attachment and transmitting it by means of the tool handle attachment to the tool handle itself may conveniently take the form of a socket wrench, although various other conventional auxiliary devices may be used instead. The tool handle attachment may be incorporated bodily in a ratchet head, although in such case there is a sacrifice of the flexibility of use that follows from the fact that with the tool handle attachment as shown and described may be used, interchangeably, such tools as socket wrenches, Stillson wrenches, pliers and other common tools that are everywhere available.

It is intended that the patent shall cover, by summarization in the appended claims, whatever features of patentable novelty reside in the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A built-up knob for a tool handle or the like comprising a plurality of similarly shaped stamped metal washers each of which has a polygonal opening therein and at least one of which has a series of serrations in its periphery, said washers being held together to enable them to act as a unit when an auxiliary device is applied to them; a piece of metal bar stock of a corresponding polygonal cross section passing through the polygonal openings in the washers and extending for a substantial distance beyond the washers on one side but not on the other side thereof, said piece of bar stock being divided by an intermediate shoulder into a projecting block-like part provided with a ball detent for coaction with the tool handle and a stud-like part of lesser crosssectional area for mounting the washers; fastening means locating the washers in place on the piece of bar stock; and a metallic bond uniting the washers and the piece of bar stock into a unitary structure to which force may be applied by the auxiliary device and by which the force so applied may be transmitted to the tool handle.

2. A built-up knob for a tool handle or the like comprising a plurality of similarly shaped stamped metal washers each of which has a polygonal opening therein and at least one of which has a series of serrations in its periphery, said washers being held together to enable them to act as a unit when an auxiliary device is applied to them; a piece of metal bar stock of a corresponding polygonal cross section passing through the polygonal openings in the washers and extending for a substantial distance beyond the washers on one side but not on the other side thereof, said piece of bar stock being divided by an intermediate shoulder into a projecting blocklike part provided with a ball detent for coaction with the tool handle and a stud-like part of lesser cross-sectional area for mounting the washers; and fastening means holding the washers in place on the stud-like part of the piece of bar stock, said fastening means taking the form of a portion of the piece of bar stock headed over into contact with that one of the washers that is farthest removed from the shoulder intermediate the ends of the piece of bar stock.

3. A method of making a tool handle attachment comprising the steps of forming an intermediate shoulder in a piece of bar stock by rounding off the corners of the piece while leaving the sides substantially intact for a substantial part, but less than all, of its length; mounting a series of washers on the rounded off part of the piece; locating the washers in place in the stretch between the shoulder and the end of the piece by fastening together the end of the piece and the washer nearest the end of the piece and bonding the washers to the piece to form a unitary structure.

PAUL W. SANDROCK.

GEORGE C. FRATZ.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date D. 45,165 Warren Jan. 13, 1914 1,028,675 Van Sickle et al. June 4, 1912 1,381,900 Barnes June 21, 1921 1,888,793 Erickson Nov. 22, 1932 1, 4,1 Taylor Apr. 18, 1933

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1028675 *Jul 11, 1911Jun 4, 1912Charles N KnappScrew-driver.
US1381900 *Apr 23, 1918Jun 21, 1921Walden Worcester IncSocket-wrench
US1888793 *Nov 28, 1930Nov 22, 1932John EricksonWrench
US1904100 *Apr 1, 1930Apr 18, 1933Gen ElectricWheel dresser
USD45165 *Nov 13, 1913Jan 13, 1914 Design for a wrench
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3343577 *Aug 8, 1966Sep 26, 1967Watsco IncSwivel top ratchet driver
US3508455 *Feb 16, 1968Apr 28, 1970Miller John FCombination tool
US4212336 *Jul 24, 1978Jul 15, 1980Smith William CScrewdriver
US4350064 *Dec 18, 1980Sep 21, 1982Markle James RAuxiliary tool kit for a socket wrench set
US4409866 *Dec 28, 1981Oct 18, 1983Mcbride JoanTool handle with contoured through passageway and spring biased trigger
US4526069 *Nov 10, 1983Jul 2, 1985Easco CorporationAdapter for wrench sockets
US4858504 *Aug 1, 1988Aug 22, 1989Jame TsaiScrewdriver with insulated shaft and polygonal driving head
US5520073 *Feb 27, 1995May 28, 1996Snap-On IncorporatedReversible ratcheting screwdriver with spinner and ergonomic handle
US5722307 *Feb 19, 1997Mar 3, 1998Chen; Chun ChiungScrew driver having a retractable and rotatable handle
US6138531 *Feb 23, 1998Oct 31, 2000Lamons; Dan E.Hand ratchet wrench
Classifications
U.S. Classification76/119, 81/58.3, 81/58.1, 81/177.2, 81/DIG.100, 76/114
International ClassificationB25B23/16, B25B15/02
Cooperative ClassificationB25B15/02, B25B23/16, Y10S81/10
European ClassificationB25B15/02, B25B23/16