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Publication numberUS2672860 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1954
Filing dateNov 28, 1950
Priority dateNov 28, 1950
Publication numberUS 2672860 A, US 2672860A, US-A-2672860, US2672860 A, US2672860A
InventorsLee W Badger, William H Badger
Original AssigneeLee W Badger, William H Badger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spinal manipulation and relaxation device
US 2672860 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 4 w. H. BADGER ET AL 2,672,860

SPINAL MANIPULATION AND RELAXATION DEVICE Filed Nov. 28, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l i L\ gm; im-Tm I3 I 79 I v mllh'k /-a fl k WW M M (IO LI m 6 "WI 7 w JIU UUUU L e W. Badger W////0m Badger INVENTORS Mardl 1954 w. H. BADGER ET AL SPINAL MANIPULATION AND RELAXATION DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 28. 1950 March 23, 1954 w. H. BADGER ET AL 2,672,860

v SPINAL MANIPULATION AND RELAXATION DEVICE Filed Nov. 28. 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Ze l/V. Badger 28 W////0m H. Badger INVENTORS BY fanlflsw A TTORNEY Patented Mar. 23, 1954 SPINAL MANIPULATIION AND RELAXATION DEVICE William H. Badger and Lee W. Badger, Houston, Tex.

Application November 28, 1950, Serial No. 197,927

14 Claims.

The invention relates to a massaging device and more particularly to an improved construction thereof.

One of the major disadvantages of mechanical massaging devices is that the construction is such that each massaging element will move a predetermined amount regardless of the weight of the patient'and regardless of the curvature of that particular portion of the body being massaged. Such mechanicaldevices can be reset to vary the massaging pressure, but in general, the mechanisms are complicated and require more time in setting the machine to each individual patient'than the actual operation of such machine for a short massaging time. I

An object of the present invention is to provide a device which is provided with a plurality of massaging elements, each of such massaging elements being adapted to fit the natural curvature of the body of the patient being massaged.

An object of the present invention is to provide a device which is provided with a plurality of massaging elements, each of such massaging elements being adapted to fit the natural curvature of the body of the patient being massaged, there being means associated with each of'the massaging elements for readily adjusting the pressure of each massaging element exerted against the body of the patient.

Still another object of-the'invention is to provide ,in a massaging table a plurality of hydraulically operated massaging elements which are adapted to fit the natural curvature of the patient.

Still another object of'th'e invention is to provide a massaging table having a plurality of movable massaging elements thereon adapted to fit the normal curvature of the body portion of the patient'being massaged, means to regulate the amount of pressure exerted by each of such massaging elements and means to stop each of the massaging elements on a down stroke or as they move away from the body of the patient just slightly below body contact. p

Still another object of the invention is to provide in a massaging table for massaging the spine of a patient, a plurality of independently movable massaging elements, means to regulate the amount of movement of such elements, means to indicate which of said elements is being forced against the body of the patient and. rotary valve means for automatically operating each of the massaging elements a predetermined manner.

,Other and further objects and advantages of the invention willbecome more'readily apparent from a consideration of the following drawings and description wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation illustrating the massaging elements positioned on a table with a patient reclining thereagainst, and showing the massaging elements as conforming to the natural curvature of the body.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an end view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a vertical cross-section partly in elevation illustrating the preferred embodiment of the operating mechanism for the movable massaging elements and taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a side elevation taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2 looking toward the opposite side of the device as illustrated in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view of the control valve used in regulating the amount of pressure exerted by each massaging element and also shows the rotary valve and a schematic flow diagram for supplying fluid to one of the cylinders and pistons for moving a massaging element.

Fig. 7 is an electrical diagram illustrating that I portion of the electric circuit connected to a rotary switch for actuating light indicating means to indicate which of the movable members is under pressure from the rotary valve.

Fig. 8 illustrates the housing of the rotary valve.

Fig. 9 is a view on the line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is an elevation of the rotary valve used to discharge pressure to each of the massaging element pistons.

Fig. 11 is a section on the line I II I of Fig. 10,

more clearly illustrating the exhaust and intake ports in the rotary valve.

Fig. 12 is the end view taken on the line l2-l2 of Fig. 10, and shows the discharge and intake ports of the-rotary valve in dotted line.

Fig. 13 illustrates the mechanism used to guide the movable massaging elements and to prevent their rotation on up and down strokes.

Figs. 14 and 15 illustrate modifications that the table may be provided with any suitable covering such as rubber 4 to provide comfort for the patient illustrated at 5 in dotted line as reclining thereon. The movable massaging elements are and the details of construction of the. preferred embodimentof the invention are illustrated. Such mechanism may be housed beneath the tab e 2- A Su p 9 may be secured to or positioned adjacent the bottom ID of the tableto provide a source of liquid such as oil to actuate the movable massaging elements. A prime mover supplies power through the pulley l3 and connected belt M to a pump i5 which draws the fluid into the supply line at I6. A strainer I! is provided in the sump to inhibit the entry of foreign materials with the fluid into the supply line |6.--

As better seen in Fig. 6, the supply line I5 dischargesr-into the separator [8 which. separates a y bubbles of air or other gas from theliquid to insure smooth operation of the apparatus. 1 Connected into one endof the separator I8 is the controlvalve H! which regulates the amount of liquid pressure: delivered through the discharge line to the rotary valve 2| to actuate the pistons and massaging elements connected thereto as hereinafter described.

It seems "obvious that heavier weight people might require more pressure exerted against their body: to effect thorough massaging thereof than a lighter person. To this end, a gauge22- is pro" videdin-the line 23 leading fromthe separator to the controlvalve l9 wherebythe amount of hydraulic pressure operable on the pistons toactuate themassaging elements may be regulated and determined. The line 24 from the control valve 19 exhausts the fluid back to the sump 9 fonreuse.

In order to better understand the operation otthemachine, Fig. 6 illustrates the operating mechanism foroneof the massaging elements;

each such massaging element .is provided with a similarly constructed operating rnechanism 'to efiect. controland actuation thereof through the rotary valve 2| and line .29. As-illustrated in thedraWingLthepistonSS is on a down stroke, howi ever, in order-to better understand the invention;.the actuationof such pistonwill be described both onanup stroke and a down stroke cycle.

Fluidpassingthrough theline 29 into the mtary'valveil. is discharged intothe annulus 25 formed between the housing 26 ofthe valve 2|.

and .the annular cut-away portion 2 !v on the rotor 28 ofzthe valve. Two ports are drilled longttudinally in the rotor 28 to discharge the liquid to-the lines ,295 leading to the control-valve 39,

Which-va-lve is provided for each. of the cylinders.

3|. Theseports are illustrated in dotted line at 32 and .33 =respectively and terminate on the peripheralsurface of the rotor in the form of open.-.

ings 34 and 35. respectively, The ports 32- and 33, are. 135-=apart as illustrated more clearly in Fig-l2; It is to be noted that the rotor 28- is provideduwith a peripheral groove 31 and, 38- ex tending thereabout and terminating at-a spaced, distance from each, side of each of the openings 34 and 35 on the periphery of such rotor so that whenathe rotor :is rotated, only one of such ports will Cneralignedwith the dischargeline-29 lead. ing tothe operating and control valve 39,-foreach of:..the cylindersat a time.

The-groovesr31 and 38 are to'receivei'exhaust. liquid from: :thelines '29: leading-from each of" the cylinders 3| when the piston 39 is on a down stroke. Ports 40 and 4| extending through the end of the rotor discharge the fiuid from the line 29 on the down stroke of the piston 39 and such fluid leaks past the end cover 42 on the housing 22 and back to the sump 9.

The housing 26 as illustrated in Fig. 8 is providedwith eight discharge ports leading to each oftheeight control valves-3|l and cylinders 3| to operate the massaging elements 43, 44, 45, 49, 41, 48 49 and 50. The discharge ports in the housing 29 ,are illustrated bythe numeral 5|, it being understood, of course, that each of such ports is connected to a line 29, valve 30, cylinder 3| and piston 39 -to move each of the massaging elements as'liquid is supplied through the line 29 by rotation of the rotor 28. i

The prime mover is provided with a belt 52 which is connected to the gear box 53, which in turn transmits power through the shaft 54 through :the switch .55 and rotatesttherotor: 28

in .theh0using 26m For purposes. of convenience I the weight of the person reclining thereonsothatv oil isfiowed backthrougheach of the. seven lines- 29=to discharge-into th rooves13l and 38 back to the sump 9. mother words, the openings. and

35- on the rotor and thegrooves 3'| and 38 are so arranged: that only one piston is receiving hydraulic pressure from theline 29 ata time.

The oil flows upwardlythrough the line 29 and into the valve 30; It passes .throughthe passage 58: past'the-valve '59 and-into the passageway 60.

It' then passes :into the discharge line 6| leading to the cylinder 3 I. The-fluid thenacts upon the piston. 39 to move it upwardly-whereby. the piston rod62" and. the-massaging element connected. thereto moves upwardly.

As soon: as the .discharge port 34 :moves past one of; the ports 5|, the-discharge port 35 is then aligned with a part5 l zwhereby the liquid pressure is exerted alternatively .onnone piston and then.

another as the openings 34 and 35 deli-ver=hydrau lic pressure to the lines 29 andnpistons'39 to moveone :massagingelement up at a time.

When the piston, moves downwardly as illustratedin Fig.16, after the port: 34-or port, 35-

whichevertisopen to theline 29,-has movedout of pressure passing engagement therewith the ,oil .wilLbe: passed-back through the line 6.|= into the passageM past the valve 62 and'back. through the line .29 into the grooves 3'|.and-38-and back to the sump ,9. Theamountof pressure that ,each

individual massaging element exerts against the.

spinal column of: apatient may be. regulated ,in-

dependently of the others-bysettingthe valve 59.

the proper .directiommoves .suchstem. downwardly. so that tit abuts against. the top of the valve 69. to close such valve: completely and inhibit the .passage ,of fiuid'to thepassage 69. vOn

the'other hand, the stem may-berotatedso that a spaceis maintained between the. endof the stem i0 andthe top of the-velvet!) whereby-the cap 59mayv move upwardly against the spring 1| to pass fluid to thepassage-way. 69. Ordinarilythe spring. .1 I will. only ,beof .sufiicient tension to-insurenow ofcthefluid one. down stroke through the passage 8|, through passage-way 64 and to the valve 62.

The spring tension on the valve 82 maintained by the spring 72 is such that it just does not quite balance the weight of the piston assembly. This weight of the piston assembly can, of course, vary depending upon the construction, and the spring tension is set to not quite balance such weight; because of this, the valve 62, when all fluid has been moved out of the cylinder due to the weight of the person against suchmassaging elements on the discharge or downstroke side, will trap suflicient fluid in the cylinder 3| so as to prevent the piston from moving all the way down to the bottom of the cylinder during any one cycle. Each element will thereby conform to the contour of the patients spinal column since the amount of clearance between each element and the spine will be about to A; inch. If the weight of the piston assembly changes, spring 12 can be adjusted to trap the proper amount of fluid on a downstroke. Of course, since the spring 12 does not quite balance the weight of the piston assembly, the piston 39 will eventually fall to the bottom of the cylinder when the machine is turned off and when no additional pressure is exerted against such piston whereby the elements will be in proper position to receive the next patient.

From the foregoing, it can be seen that anyone or all of the massaging elements can be quickly and easily taken out of operation by means of the stem 68, and on the other hand, if one particular part of the spine needs more massaging or more pressure thereagainst than another part, the stem 68 allows more pressure to be exerted against the piston 39 and to effect movement of the massaging element against that portion of the spine.

In order to guide the massaging elements upwardly against the spine of a patient and to prevent such massaging elements from turning, a bracket 13 is secured to the piston 82 and is arranged to slidablyengage the rod 15 as illustrated in Fig. 13. This prevents rotation of the massaging elements on up and down strokes. Figs. 14 and 15 illustrate modifications, which may be utilized in lieu of the spring 12 on the discharge side of the cylinder. In Fig. 14a spring 18 secured to a bracket 11 which is, in turn, connected to the bracket 13, so that such spring 18 will allow the pistons to move downwardly so long as pressure is exerted thereagainst by the patient, but when the weight of the piston assembly is the only pressure exerted against the fluid being discharged from the cylinder 31, the spring ofisets such weight and helps to trap the fluid in the cylinder. Fig. 15 shows a weight I8 for accom plishing the same purpose. In order to determine which of the massaging elements is receiving pressure from the rotary valve assembly, a, plurality of control lights 19 are provided on the panel I.

Reference to Fig. '7 will explain a portion of the electrical circuit used in this invention and particularly that portion relating to the correlation of the light with the particular piston under pressure.

In Fig. 7 the electrical circuit is denominated generally by the numeral 89. Power from any suitable source is passed through the leads 8| and 82 with a switch 83 being provided to break the circuit. The rotary switch 55 on shaft 54 is illlustrated in detail. This rotary switch is so ar-' ranged that'a contact will be providedtosupply 6: a source of energy to the light 19 on the control panel 1,-depending upon which of the massaging elements is receiving fluid pressure from the hydraulic system.

The shaft 54 extends through the rotary switch and secured to such shaft is a non-conducting rotor .84. This rotor is provided with contacts and 86 held in spaced relation by spring 9|, one of such contacts being arranged to engage the metal plate 81 to which is secured the contact '88. When the electrical circuit is energized,

power will flow through the motor and the transformer 89 to the switch 88, thereby energizing plate 81 and contact 85. Energy is transmitted fromcontact 85 by means of the conductor 99 and spring 9| to the contact 88. As the shaft 54 and rotor 84 rotate, the contacts 85 and 88 move in an \arcuate path therewith. A plurality of contacts 9| extend through the housing 92 of the rotary switch '55 and as the contacts 85 and 8B are rotated, the contact 86 will engage one of the contacts 9|, thereby completing the circuit and lighting the light 19. The contacts 9| are arranged in the housing 92 of the rotary switch 55 so that when the port 34 or 35 is discharging fluid to a particular cylinder, the contact 86 will engage the particular contact 9| correlated with such cylinder to show which cylinder is under fluid pressure.

It is desirable to have the massaging element '59 in up position when the device is turned off, and to this end, a switch 94 is provided whereby the circuit will be energized even after the switch 83 has been opened until the cam 95 en-.

gages the switch 94 and opens it. The cam 95 is arranged on the shaft 54 and is correlated with the rotary valve so that when the port or opening 34 is aligned to supply fluid pressure to the cylinder which operates massaging element 58, the switch 94 will be opened to stop prime mover II. This, when switch 83' has been previously opened, de-energizes the circuit and stops the rotary valve so that massaging element 50 is in up position.

This is advantageous in that massaging element 58 is arranged to engage the spinal element at the base of the skull as illustrated at 95 in Fig. l, and should be in an elevated position when a patient is inclined on the table at the beginning of the massaging treatment to fit the natural curvature of the spine at this point.

From the foregoing, it can be readily seen that a device is provided which adjusts itself to compensate for the natural curvature of a patients spine.

This is advantageous in that different persons have various types of spinal columns which are,

deformed to various degrees. In view of the fact that each of the cylinders can be adjusted by means of the stem 66 to determine the amount of pressure exerted against the persons spine, the massaging element connected thereto will move up depending upon the adjustment.

Generally, at the beginning of the treatment, all of the valves 59 will be so adjusted depending upon the weight of the patient being treated. For example, if a Woman is'to be treated, the control valve I9 is adjusted so that possibly a total amount of 50 pounds pressure can be exerted against any one of the pistons 39. After setting the main control valve l9, each of the independent valves 59 connected to each of the massaging elements can be adjusted depending upon the amount of lift desired and the condition of that particular patient being treated.

- 'If a heavier person is to be massaged by this.

aerated machine; it may be necessary rte .increase itha pressure" operable upon the pistons v:3 9' up to, say:

100:lbs; by-;means of. the control 'valvevl9. Here" again, each of the massaging elements ca'n'ibel readily adj-uste'dto increase ordecreaseithestroke oftthe :pistons 39 and-corresponding connected massaging elements-to suit the particular needs: of thepatient aswdetermined by the doctor.

As a practical: matter; it has loeenufound de'- sirable :to move massaging =e1ement 50 thezfirst: oneopened to hydrauliczpressure when the system is energized as'previously'described. Massag in'g. element "46 is next subjected to fluid pressure by movement of theiurotary valve, 4.9'-next,"45 next',: '48 next, M. next, 41* next and 43-last. As a practical mattenithaszbeen found desirablev to have about 4 to 6 cyclesper minute, so that the'stroke' of each piston consumes approximately seconds. Of course, this can be varied vif ;de"-- sired;

The cylinders 3!, piston rod 62 and massaging elements 43 through til/inclusive are mounted in a frame denoted by thenumeral 99;" Any suitable. type of supportframing may be utilized: to provide the resultsdesired.

Broadly; the invention relates .to a device'which is provided with a plurality of massaging elements, such device including a construction "for. readily adjusting the amount of pressure exerted by each of the massaging elements independently of: the pressure exertedi by the others.

What is claimed is:

1. A massaging device, including a plurality of massagingxelem'ents, rodssecured thereto; a pissupply hydraulic pressure to said cylinders :to-

move said pistons and connected massaging .ele-.- ments, and a control valve secured between said:

rotary valve: and each ofxsaid' cylindersto regu-- lateth'e amount of hydraulic pressure actingon each ofsaid pistons independently of therpres sure acting on other pistons, said control valve including an. inlet valveto receive hydraulicpressure fromsaid rotary valve and a discharge valveto=-discharge hydraulic pressure fromrsaid cylinder, said discharge valve including spring means toicounterbalance the weight of said piston, rod: and connected :massaging element.

3. A massaging'device' for massaging the-spinal. column of a patient, comprising a table-upon which the patient reclines, a central opening therein occupying a region covered by the patients spinal: column, a'plurality of hydraulicallyoperated massaging elements arranged in end to end succession insaid opening mounted for reciprocating movement to points above the table surface, motor operated means to confine the reciprocation of said elements to a fixed sequence. and manually operable means to modify responseto the motor operated means to vary the'range of reciprocation of each of said elements independentlyof said other-elements, said last means includingra valve'means to regulatethe amount of: hydraulic pressure exerted against said mas-i sage elements.

4. massaging device, including .a plurality of massaging elements, 'means to move said elements, said means'including a rod secured to eachnof said-=-members, pistons on one endof each of...saidwrods, a cylinder to receive each-of said-pistons, conduits to supply liquid under pressuretosaid cylinders,:a rotary valve to regulate and supply pressure liquid from a source to one of said 'conduitszat a time,,-a valve in each of said conduits to control "the amount of liquid pressure exerted against-*each of said-pistons, said valve including check means'to trap fluid in said cylinder equal to the weightuof said piston, rod, and connected massaging element.

5. In a massaging device" for massaging the spine: of a patient, a plurality of movable mas-- sage -elements, means to. move said elements to massaging relation with the patient, said meansincluding: a hydraulic system r having a motor driven pump and valve to supply pressure fluid in: given sequence to said elements for their cycled reciprocation; and means in saidsystem to modify the delivery of pressure fluid actuat-- ing .anymassageelement independently of the pressure acting on other. massage elements.

6. Adevice for massagingwthe spine of a pa-- tient, including a plurality of massaging elementsmeanstto move said elements to massaging relation with the patient; sa-idmeansin'cluding a rodsecured to eachofsaidmembers, pistons on one end of. each of said-rods, a cylinder to receive each of said pistons,'-conduits to supply liquid under pressure to said cylinders, a rotary valve-to regulate and supply pressure liquid. from a-sourceto one of saicl conduitsata time,:a

valve in "eachfof said conduits to control theamount of liquid pressure exerted against-each of. said pistons, said valve check meansto trap liquid (in-said cylinder. equal to the weight of said piston, rod, and-connected massaging element.

7. A cmassagingzdevice, comprising; a support frame; a plurality of movable massage elements mounted therein, means mounted-on said frame. to reciprocate said elements, said means including a rod secured to each of said members, pistons on each oii said: rods; a cylinder toreceiveeach-ofsaidwpistons, conduitsto -supply liquid under pressure' toeach of saidcylinders; valve:

means to..supply pressure liquid from a source to oneof said conduits at a time, valve means in each' of said conduits to control the amount of. liquid-pressure exerted from saidsupplyvalve to each of said-cylinders, and indicating means correlated with. said supply valve to-indicate which of. said: cylinders. isv receiving liquid. pressure fromsaid supply control valve.

8. i A massaging. device, comprising a support frame a plurality .otmovable massage elements mounted-therein, means mounted onsaid frame to reciprocate said elements, said means including a rod secured to each of said members, pistonsoneach of said .rods, a :cylinder to receive each. of said pistons conduitsto supply liquid under pressure to each of said cylinders, valve means to control the total liquid pressure which canheexerted against each-of said pistons, valve means to'selectively supply pressure liquid to one of said conduits at a time, valve meansin each of saidaconduits to .control the amount ofzliquid pressure. exerted from said-.sup-,

plyvalve toeach of said cylinders, and -indicating means ear-related with -said supply-valve to.

indicate which of said cylinders is receiving liquid pressure from said supply control valve.

9. In a hydraulically operated massaging device, a plurality of hydraulically operated massaging elements, conduit means to supply pressure liquid to each of said elements and control valve means connected to said conduit means to regulate the pressure liquid operating on said massaging elements, said control valve means including a one way acting valve on the inlet side thereof to receive liquid from said conduit means and a one way acting valve on the discharge side thereof to discharge liquid into said conduit means.

10. In a hydraulically actuated massaging device, a plurality of hydraulically actuated massaging elements, conduit means to supply pressure liquid to each of said elements; valve means to selectively supply pressure liquid to said conduit means and associated massaging element, and control valve means connected to said conduit to regulate the pressure liquid operating on each of said massaging elements, said control valve including a one way acting inlet valve to receive pressure liquid from said conduit means, and a one way acting discharge valve to discharge pressure liquid to said conduit means.

11. In a massaging device, a plurality of reciprocable massaging elements, means to hydraulically reciprocate said elements, said means including a hydraulic system having a motor driven cycling valve to supply pressure liquid to all of said elements in fixed sequence, and manually controlled valve means in said system to regulate the pressure liquid supplied through said cycling valve to each of said massaging elements independently of the pressure acting on the other massage elements.

12. In a massaging device, a plurality of reciprocable massaging elements, means to hydraulically reciprocate said elements, said means including a hydraulic system to supply pressure I0 liquid to each of said elements, and valve means in said system to regulate the pressure liquid operating on each of said massaging elements independently of the pressure acting on the other massage elements, said valve including a one way acting inlet valve to supply pressure liquid to said elements and a one way acting discharge valve to discharge pressure liquid from said elements.

13. In a hydraulically actuated massaging device, a plurality of reciprocable massaging elements having pressure liquid actuating devices a control valve to regulate the flow of liquid to said devices in sequence, another control valve between the first control valve and each device comprising a one way acting inlet valve to supply liquid to the device and a one way acting discharge valve to discharge pressure liquid from the device.

14. In a massaging machine, a series of movable pads, a fluid pressure responsive motor for operating each pad, a motor driven fluid pressure supply valve for directing pressure fluid to the respective motors in fixed sequence, and a manually controlled valve interposed between the supply valve and each pressure responsive motor for enabling timing of response of a given motor independently of the response of other motors.

WILLIAM H. BADGER. LEE W. BADGER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 728,526 Wantz May 19, 1903 941,673 Church Nov. 30, 1909 1,797,306 Webb Mar. .24, 1931 2,150,519 Rogers Mar. 14, 1939 2,445,158 Sparhawk July 13, 1948 2,598,204 Allen May 27, 1952

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3298363 *Jul 12, 1963Jan 17, 1967Parmac CorpPhysiotherapy apparatus with adjustable body supporting members
US4170989 *Nov 21, 1977Oct 16, 1979Herbert GeartnerMassaging apparatus
US4779615 *May 13, 1987Oct 25, 1988Frazier Richard KTactile stimulator
US4999861 *Apr 2, 1990Mar 19, 1991Huang Mike HWave motion bed
US5092316 *Apr 27, 1988Mar 3, 1992Taylor Alan R GPhysiotherapy device
US5109558 *Jul 15, 1991May 5, 1992Rosario Di BlasiBed with its resting surface at least partly of keyboard form
DE1108379B *Feb 27, 1958Jun 8, 1961Helmut Bross Dipl IngMassagegeraet in der Gestalt eines Kissens oder eines Matratzeneinlegeteiles
DE1566516B1 *Apr 7, 1967Dec 2, 1971Takeuchi Tekko KkMassagegeraet
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/149, 601/103, D24/215
International ClassificationA61H1/00, A61H23/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61H23/04, A61H2205/081, A61H2201/0142