Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2672953 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1954
Filing dateAug 2, 1946
Priority dateAug 2, 1946
Publication numberUS 2672953 A, US 2672953A, US-A-2672953, US2672953 A, US2672953A
InventorsEdwin L Cline
Original AssigneeClayton Manufacturing Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dynamometer with built-in heat exchanger
US 2672953 A
Abstract  available in
Images(18)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, .1954

E. CLINE 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER FiledAug. 2, 1946 18 Sheets-Shea t 1 March 23, 1954 cLlNE 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2, 1946 18 Sheets-Sheet 2 Edwzk Z. (Zine 534 5M 1" W E. L. CLINE March 23, 1954 DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER l8 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 2, 1946 3mm Eazazh L. (ii/ea.

March 23, 1954 E. L. CLINE 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2. 1946 l8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Edwzh L. (/z'na.

52 WM 7 W March 23, 1954 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILTIN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2, 1946 18 Sheets-Sheet 5 m1 6 14-1 l 157 lrza 14-6 f 1 1/ 4 "k; m 1zs 15a Edwin L. Cline.

March 23, 1954 E. CLINE DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER March 23, 1954 E, CLINE DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER l8 Sheets-Sheet 9 Filed Aug. 2, 1946 Edwin .L. Kline.

March 23, 1954 E, LINE' 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2, 1946 18 Sheets-Sheet l0 v Jaz fawz'iz L. ('(z'n e.

anew- March 23, 1954 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2. 1946 18 Sheets-Sheet 11 Edzuz'r'z L. (Zine.

1 Mam e March 23, 1954 cLlNE 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2. 1946 18 Sheets-Sheet 12 gwua/wtom Edwin L. (line.

35 wa e-n v I W March 23, 1954 E. L. CLINE DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER l8 Sheets-Sheet 15 Filed Aug. 2. 1946 Edwz'rz L. Cline.

flagf 4-14 March 23, 1954 E. L. CLINE 7 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2, 1946 is Sheets-Sheet 14 Edwin, L. 11 228 March 23, 1954 E. CLINE 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2', 1946 1a Sheets-Sheet 15 l 3mm Edwin L. (Yz'ize.

March 23, 1954 E 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2, 1946 l8 Sheets-Sheet l6 Edwin L. ('(z'rze.

I March 23, 1954 N 2,672,953

DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Aug. 2, 1946 18 Sheets-Sheet 17 lay-- Edwin L. Cline.

vmfaaww Patented Mar. 23, 1954 DYNAMOMETER WITH BUILT-IN HEAT EXCHANGER Edwin L. Cline, Pasadena, Caliii, assignor to Clayton Manufacturing Company,

Alhambra,

Calif., a corporation of California Application August 2, 1946, Serial No. 688,004

The present invention relates to hydraulic dynamometers or brakes, and more particularly to dynamometers or brakes employed as power absorption devices and having heat exchange means associated therewith for efiectin cooling of the I power absorption fluid.

More specifically; the invention relates to a novel power absorption device including heat exchange means arranged in the housing of the device, whereby the device can be made as an extremely compact, self-contained unit. The present invention contemplates disposing the heat exchange mean in either the normal working circuit of a brake or dynamometer (which provides an extremely compact unit), or externally of the normal working circuit; or where unusually great amounts of heat are to be absorbed, disposition of the heat exchange means in both the normal working circuit and externally of said working circuit. The invention further contemplates the use of any suitable liquid or gas as the power absorption fluid, the heat exchange means disclosed being adapted to cool both. When a gas, such as air, is employed as the power absorption fluid, the'same can be introduced into the brake or dynamometer housing under super-atmospheric pressure and used alone to absorb loads slightly in excess of the normal windage load, or used with a liquid to efiect stability under certain load conditions, or alone under sub-atmospheric pressure where loads less than the normal windage load are to be absorbed, all as fully set forth in greater detail in my copending application Serial No. 686,346, filed July 26, 1946, Patem No. 2,634,830, April 14, 1953. The invention still further contemplates the use of liquid or air as a cooling medium for the power absorption fluid.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a compact power absorption device having a built-in heat exchanger of sufiicient capacity to maintain the power absorption fluid at a desired operating temperature regardless of the load.

Another object of the invention is to provide a power absorption device with a built-in heat exchanger so associated with the normal working circuit of said device as to provide a closed circulating system for the brake or power absorption fluid, thereby making it possible to maintain any desired constant load without excessive operating temperatures.

Another object of the invention is to provide a hydraulic power absorption device including heat exchange means constructed to permit high 57 Claims. (Cl. 188-90) velocity flow therethrough during all conditions of operation of the device so as to maintain the air and the liquid in the device in a state of thorough mechanical intermixture, whereby to maintain a constant load by preventing air from collecting in large bodies and at the same time eflecting eflicient cooling of said mixture.

Another object of the invention is to provide a power absorption device having heat exchange means disposed within the housing thereof in either the normal working circuit of the device, or externally of the normal working circuit of the device, or in both the normal working circuit and externally of the normal working circuit of the device.

A further object of the invention is to provide a power absorption device with a heat exchanger that can be readily removed for servicing or repairs, if necessary.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a power absorption device having a builtin heat exchanger and in which all of the parts including those of the heat exchanger are hydrodynamically balanced to reduce harmonics and undue vibration.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a self-contained power absorption unit including heat exchange means rendering the unit extremely compact, and particularly adapted for us in installations Where space is at a premium, for example, in chassis dynamometers.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the fOHOWillg descrip-' tion taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which more or less diagrammatically illustrate several operative embodiments of the invention, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view through one form of power absorption device or dynamometer; taken on the section line I I of Fig. 2, and having a built-in heat exchanger includin transverse tubes disposed in a cooling circuit separate from the normal working circuit of the dynamometer and in a zone outwardly beyond the periphery of the rotor;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational View of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 1, with portions there-' of shown in cross-section as viewed on the staggered section line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view through another form of dynamometer taken on the section line 3-3 of Fig. 5, and having a remov able heat exchanger in a circuit separatefrom the normal working circuit of the dynamometer but in a zone coaxial with the rotor;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View through one of the cores of the heat exchanger shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 3, with portions thereof shown in cross-section as viewed on the staggered section line 5--5-of Fig.3.;

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view through another form of dynamometer taken on the section line 6-6 of Fig. 7, and having a heat exchanger disposed in a circuit separate from the normal working circuit of thedynamometer and including circumferentially extending tubes disposed in a zone outwardly beyond the periphery of the rotor;

Fig. 7 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 6, with portions thereof shown in cross-section as viewed on the staggered section line 1-1 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view of a dynamQmeter-somewhat similar to that shown in Fig. 6,, but including a modified form of rotor and being taken :on the section line -88 of Fig. 9;

Fig. :9 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown .in Fig. 8, with portions thereof shown in cross-section as viewed on the staggered section line 9--9 of Fig. 8;

.10 is .a vertical sectional view through another form .of dynamometer, taken on the section line I0-l-0 of Fig. 11., and including .cir-

cumferentially extending heat exchange tubes disposed in the normal working circuit of the .dynamometer;

Fig. 1.1 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 10, with portions thereof shown in cross-section as viewed on the staggered sectionline ll-ll of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is .a view partly in section taken on the section line !2--l2 of Fig. 11 and particularly illustrating the path of the power absorption fluid with respect to the heat exchange tubes;

Fig. 13 is a vertical sectional view through another :form of dynamometer, taken on the section line 'l3-l:3 of Fig. 14, including two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in the normal working circuit of the dynamometer and the other of which is disposed externally of said normal working circuit, but both functioning to cool the same power absorption fluid;

Fig. .14 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 13, with portions thereof shown in cross-section as viewed on the staggered section line 1 4-44 of Fig. 13;

Fig. 15 is a view partly in section taken on the section line 15-45 of Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 is a vertical sectional view through still another form of dynamometer, taken on the section line iii-l6 of Fig. 17, including a heat exchanger arranged externally of the normal working circuit of the dynamometer with the tubes of the heat exchanger adapted to be air cooled;

Fig. 1-7 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 16, with a portion thereof shown in cross-section as viewed on the section line lI-ll of Fig. 16;

Fig. 18 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the section line l8l 8 of Fig. 16;

Fig. 1-9 is a vertical sectional view through another form of dynamometer, taken on the line |9-l 9 of Fig. 20, including two removable heat exchangers arranged in a cooling circuit externally of the normal working circuit of the dyna-. mometer; and

Fig. 20 is a side elevational view of the dynamometer shown in Fig. 19 with a portion thereof 4 shown in cross-section as viewed on the section line Eli-2i! of Fig. 19.

Referring now to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the dynamometer shown therein comprises a housing 28 including two housing sections 2! and 22, The housing sections and 22 include stepped, mating surfaces '23 and 724 for axially aligning said sections, and bolts 25 pass through said sections to secure the same together. The housing sections 25 and 22 are provided with openings 26 and fl, respectively, for the reception of a rotor shaft 26. The shaft 26 is adapted to be connected with a prime mover (not shown) for absorbing the power developed by said prime mover.

A bracket 29 is secured to each of the housing sections 2| and 22 by bolts 3U. Each of the brackets 26 contains,a ball bearing 33 serving as an anti-friction mounting for the shaft 28. The bearings 3i are held in the brackets 29 by .a dust-excluding, retainer plate 32 fastened to the brachetsttl by bolts 33. Enclosed within each of the brackets 26 is a gland 3& which engages packing material surrounding the shaft 28 to prevent the leakage of fluid from within the housing 25 outwardly along the shaft .28. Screws 3% are provided for adjusting the gland 34 to compress the packing 35 into sealing relation around the shaft 28.

Each of the housing sections 2! and 22 is pro vided with an annular pocket 37, which is substantially semi-circular or semi-toroidal in radial cross-section. Each of the pockets 5'! is provided with a set of radial vanes 33 which extend completely thereacross and a second set of radially extending vanes 39 is disposed between each two adjacent radial vanes 38. A circumferentially extending, substantially semi-circular vortexforming web as is disposed between each of the vanes til-39. The vanes 3;), as distinguished from the vanes 3", do not terminate at their innermost portion in a plane common with that of the .inner face of the pocket 3'5, but on the contrary, terminate in an edge t! extending angularly from the innermost portion of the web 49, as best shown in Fig. 1.

A multiplicity of heat exchange tubes 52 is arranged transversely in each housing section 2|-22 in a zone disposed outwardly beyond the substantially semi-toroidal pockets 3'5. The tubes 52 are supported at their opposite ends in spaced header walls 43 and 44 that cooperate to provide a chamber 45 for cooling liquid. which is brought into contact with the exterior surface of the tubes 32 in a manner explained hereinafter. The innermost ends of the tubes t2 communicate with inlet passages 66 disposed between vanes til formed in the housing sections El and 22 in a vertical plane disposed inwardly of the pockets 3? and in alignment with pumping pockets 48 formed in a rotor 46. Continuations of the spaces between the stator webs 38 and 39 form return passages 59 extending from the outer ends of the tubes 42 to the semi-toroidal pockets 31.

The rotor 48 may be keyed or otherwise suitably secured to the shaft 28 for rotation therewith. The rotor 49 may be made in one piece. or in two sections 5|, as best shown in Fig. 1. The sections 51 may be secured together in any suitable manner. Each of the sections 51 is provided with a substantially semi-toroidal pocket 52 arranged in confronting relation with one of the pockets 31. .A set of radial vanes 53 extends completely across the pockets 52 and a second

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1032147 *Apr 1, 1911Jul 9, 1912Ernst Wilhelm KoesterTurbo-compressor.
US1080743 *May 17, 1910Dec 9, 1913Gen ElectricRotary compressor.
US1265650 *Apr 14, 1917May 7, 1918Escher Wyss Maschf AgCooling device in multistage centrifugal compressors.
US1425855 *Dec 1, 1920Aug 15, 1922Benjamin GraemigerCooling device in multistage centrifugal compressors
US2164173 *Jun 22, 1938Jun 27, 1939Nat Supply CoHydraulic power transmission apparatus
US2185491 *May 16, 1936Jan 2, 1940Anderson Rexford OHydraulic braking apparatus
US2186706 *Nov 14, 1934Jan 9, 1940Michael MartinkaCombustion engine and a method for the operation thereof
US2189189 *Sep 18, 1937Feb 6, 1940A E Feragen IncAbsorption dynamometer
US2361726 *Feb 6, 1941Oct 31, 1944Wilhelm WeimarMultistage compressor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2706405 *Sep 17, 1954Apr 19, 1955Mann Robert WAir absorption dynamometer
US2786552 *Mar 20, 1952Mar 26, 1957Parkersburg Rig & Reel CoHydrodynamic brakes
US2790518 *Nov 3, 1951Apr 30, 1957Us Spring & Bumper CoHydrodynamic brake with rotor pumps
US2827133 *Jun 9, 1952Mar 18, 1958Schneider Brothers CompanyHydraulic turbo brake
US2827989 *Jul 3, 1953Mar 25, 1958Gen Motors CorpHydrodynamic drive and brake
US3362162 *Jun 30, 1966Jan 9, 1968Rover Co LtdAutomatic power transmissions for motor vehicles
US3489252 *Dec 5, 1967Jan 13, 1970Teves Gmbh AlfredHydrodynamic brake
US3537264 *Mar 27, 1969Nov 3, 1970Eaton Yale & TowneCentrifugally balanced fluid power transmitting or absorbing device
US3593828 *Sep 15, 1969Jul 20, 1971Teves Gmbh AlfredHydrodynamic brake
US4213332 *Jan 15, 1979Jul 22, 1980M & W Gear CompanyRotor-stator configuration for water brake dynamometer
US4864872 *Jun 13, 1988Sep 12, 1989Stahl Jere FHydraulic dynamometer
US4895233 *Apr 5, 1989Jan 23, 1990Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaElectromagnetic coupling apparatus equipped with heat pipes
US5396811 *Mar 29, 1993Mar 14, 1995The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyFluid dynamometer having fluid characteristic power absorption adjustment capability
US5571975 *Apr 28, 1995Nov 5, 1996Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyPower absorbing dynamometer
DE2346495A1 *Sep 13, 1973Oct 10, 1974Gen Motors CorpAntriebsanlage, insbesondere fuer kraftfahrzeuge
Classifications
U.S. Classification188/274, 188/296, 60/912, 165/47, 418/86, 60/337, 73/862.14
International ClassificationG01L3/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S60/912, G01L3/20
European ClassificationG01L3/20