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Publication numberUS2673919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1954
Filing dateJan 29, 1952
Priority dateJan 29, 1952
Publication numberUS 2673919 A, US 2673919A, US-A-2673919, US2673919 A, US2673919A
InventorsArvins Nathan A, Arvintz Abraham A, Arvintz Robert A
Original AssigneeArvins Viscolator Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid preheater
US 2673919 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March '30, 1954 N. A. ARVINS ET AL 2,673,919

FLUID PREHEATER Filed Jan 29, 1952 I INVENTOR. 3 NATHAN A. ARVINS ABRAHAM A.ARVINTZ ROBERT'A.ARVINTZ ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 30, 1954 2,673,919 FLUID PREHEATER Nathan A. Arvins, Brooklyn, Abraham A. Arvintz, Hollis, and Robert A. Arvintz, New York, N. Y., assignors to Arvins Viscolator Corporation, Brooklyn, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application January 29, 1952, Serial No. 268,846

Claims.

This invention relates to fluid heaters, wherein a fluid is circulated through a heat exchanging unit for delivery to a predetermined point of discharge and, further, wherein air is circulated through a coil and heated by the same heating medium for transmission to the same point of discharge, as with paint, lacquer and similar preheaters of the type generally known in the art.

More particularly, the invention deals with a heater unit having an arrangement of straght fluid circulating coils disposed in a heat conducting body and so mounted in the casing of the apparatus as to facilitate cleaning of the respective tubes without disturbing arrangement of the tubes in the casing.

The novel features of the invention will be best understood from the following description, when taken together with the accompanying drawing, in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed and, in which, the separate parts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views and, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section through a heater made accord ng to our invention, with part of the structure broken away and shown in a right angle section.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the structure, as seen in Fig. 1, with parts ofthe construction broken away and in section.

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the structure, as

seen in Fig. 1, with parts of the construction broken away and in section.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail sectional view, showing a modified arrangement of air coil mounting; and

Fig. 5 is a view s'milar to Fig. 4, showing another modification. I

In Fig. l of the drawing, we have shown a heater comprising an elongated tubular casing ID, to the lower end of which is secured a header ll, having circumferentially spaced supporting feet l2 cn an outwardly extending flange portion [3 of the header. At upper and lower ends of the tubular cas ng lli are tube plates l4 and 15, with which a series of circumferentially arranged fluid circulating tubes [6 are secured.

Secured to the upper header or plate I4 is an upper cap or closure plate construction ll, hava ing an outwardly extending flange l8 of similar diameter to the plate or flange l3 and adapted to support an outer tube or jacket I9. Mounted in the closure plate I1 is an elongated electric cartrdge heater tube 28, having terminals 2i and 22' disposed within the chamber 23 of the closure plate l1. Also mounted in the closure plate I? is an acuastat 24, the circuit wires 25 of which are in circuit with the terminals 2| and 22 and with a light bulb Unit 26 mounted on one wall of the cover plate I". as clearly ind'cated in Fi". 2 of the drawing. This circuit is such that the aquastat will indicate temperature of the preheater; whereas, the light bulb 26 will indicate externally of the heater that the heating unit is in operation or, in other words, that circuit is completed to the cartridge heater 2e arrangedin-tube 20'.-

Disposed in the casing H),- around the circulating tubes 16 and the cartridge heater 20' and aquastat 2% is a body of heat conducting material 21, preferably formed from aluminum which can be moulded or otherwise formed around the tubes it, 20 and aquastat 24 and then arranged in the casing It. This construction will provide an efficient means of conducting heat from the heater cartridge 26 tothctubes 16, then to the casing 18 and, thus, to an air coil 28 encircling and contracting the upper portion of the casing Hi. This coil 28 has intake and discharge ends 29 and 38, note Fig. 3, which extend from suitable fittin s 3i and 32, respectively, with which ends of thecoil 28 couple.

The coil 28 is contained within a suitable housing, or casing, 33 which may be in the form or ahminum fo'l, asbestos cloth,. or the like, to protect the coils in theoperation of inserting glass-wool insulation 34 .into the chamber bei tween the casing l0 and jacket I 9 and outwardly of the housing 33. This insulation also facilitates heat conductivity to the air coil 28, as will be apparent.

The top wall of the header II has apertures 36, registering with the tubes l6, and the cap ll has similar a ertures 31, registering with the upper ends of the tubes I6. The'last named apertures open into an annular chamber 38, controlling bypassing of the fluid circulating through one group of tubes I6 and to another group thereof,

th s chamber being closed by a ring plate 39. It i will appear from Fig. l of the drawing that the terminals 2| and 22 and the outer end of the aquastat are disposed within the chamber 23.. This chamber is closed by a detachable cover plate 40.

The header l I has a downwardy extending partition M which divides the header into an intake 1 chamber 42 and an outlet chamber 43; note also,

The plate to has plugs to arranged in alinement with the apertures and similar plugs 46 are disposed in the ring 35, so as to facilitate cleanout of the tube it without displacing the header Ii, plate i l and ring 39, the cover plate 40 being removed when this operation is performed.

Arranged between the casin l0 and jacket l9 at one side of the header and disposed within the compartment in which the insulation 34' is arranged is an electric conduit 41, which opens into the chamber-E3, or a side extension 23 Coal thereof, as seen in Fig. 1. The extension 23' is closed bya plug 48. The lower end of the conduit 41 couples with an electric fitting 49 opening out through the jacket 19, the fittin having a removable plate so to gain access to the interior of the fitting and a tubular discharge 5|, through which the circuit wires, which service the heater, aquastat and lamp, pass, as will be clearly apparent. The fitting 49 is supported upon the flange extension [3, as will be apparent.

Considering now Fig. 3 of the drawing, it will appear that extending into the header H is an inlet fitting 52, by means of which fluid to be heated can be introduced into the chamber 42 and, at is shown a similar outlet fittin for discharging the fluid fromthe chamber 43. In the event of a build-up in pressure at the discharge end, we provide another fitting 54 exposed to the chamber 43, from which fluid can be returned to a source of supply. It will be understood, inthis connection, that, in most instances, the fluid to be heated, such as paint lacquers and the like, have a forced circulation through the heating apparatus. In this connection, it will be apparent that the extended passage of the fluid through the long circulating tubes [6 will provide an efiicient operation of the heater.

In Fig. 4 of the drawing, we have shown a modifled mounting of the air coil in the heater and, in. this figure, l9 represents the outer jacket; lo" the casing; 15 one of the circulating tubes; 21' the heat conductin body and it will here be noted that the air coil 28 is disposed within the casinglo and embedded in the body 21', rather than being disposed outwardly oi the casing 10,

as in Fig 1.

In Fig. 5 of the drawin we have shown a further modification, wherein 19 represents the outer jacket; l5" one of the fluid circulating tubes; and at 28" the air coil. With this C011.

struction, the casing I0 is dispensed with and a heat conducting body 55, similar in characteristics to the heat conducting body 21, is employed, with the exception that means'will be provided to receive the coil 28" on the surface of the body 55. This means comprises peripheral grooves, as at 55, in the body 55.

For sake of clarity in the showing, it will be r noted that, at the lower part of Fig. 1 of the drawing, part of the structure is broken away to show the cross-section of the partition 4| at right angles to the showing in Fig. 1 or, in other words, consistent with the showing in Fig. 3 ol' the drawing,

Having fully described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat-.- ent is:

1. A fluid heater of the character described, comprising a tubular casing having an insulated jacket encircling and spaced therefrom, a plurality offluid circulating tubes extending longitudinally of and disposed within said casing, means for by-passing fluid from one group of tubes to another at one end of the casing, the other end of the casing havin intake and discharge chambers communicating with said different groups of tubes, means for controlling intake and discharge or fluid with respect to said intake and discharge chambers, a heater disposed in said casing and arranged longitudinally with respect to said tubes, said heater and tubes being enveloped in a body of heat transmitting material, and means providing access to opposed a open ends of the circulating tubes without disturbing mounting of the several casing parts of the heater.

2. A fluid heater of the character described, comprising a tubular casing having an insulated jacket encircling and spaced therefrom, a plurality of fluid circulating tubes extending longitudinally of and disposed within said casing, means for by-passing fluid from one group of tubes to another at one end of the casing, the other end of the casing having intake and discharge chambers communicating with said different groups of tubes, means for controlling intake and discharge of fluid with respect to said intake and discharge chambers, a heater disposed in said casing and arranged longitudinally with respect to said tubes, said heater and tubes beingenveloped in a body ofheat transmitting material, means providin access to opposed open ends of the circulating tubes without disturbing mounting of the several casing parts of the heater, and said last named means comprising plates having. plugged openings in alinement with ends of thefluid circulating tubes.

3. A fluid heater of the character described,

comprising a plurality of fluid circulating tubes having ends joined by tube plates, a body of insulating material completely enveloping the tubes intermediate said plates, another tube extending into and enveloped by said opening and opening outwardly through one of said plates for support of an electric heater to heat said body, headers secured to the tube platescontrolling circulation of a fluid to be heated through said tubes, said headers having outwardly extendingflanges- 01' greater diameter than-the diameter of said body of insulating material, a casing securedto the flanges and enveloping said body to form an insulating chamber therearound, insulation arranged in said chamber, said headers having apertures alined with the ends of said tubes, plates detachablewith respect to said headers, andsaid plates having plugged apertures alined with the apertures of the header to facilitatecleaning-out of said circulating tubes.

4. A fluid heater of the character described;

comprising a plurality of fluid circulating tubes having ends joined by tube plates, a body of insulating material completely enveloping the tubes intermediate said plates, another tube extendinginto and enveloped by said opening and opening outwardly through one of said plates for support of an electric heater to heat said body, headers secured to the tube plates controlling circulation;

of a fluid to be heated through said tubes, said headers having outwardly extending flanges-01' greater diameter than the diameter of said body of insulating material, a casing secured to the flanges and enveloping said body to form an insulating chamber therearound, insulation arranged in said chamber, said headers having apertures alined with the ends of said tubes, plates detachable with respect to said headers, said plates having plugged apertures alined with the apertures of the header to facilitatecleaningout of said circulating tubes, one of said headers having an extension forming a chamber beyond the plate of said header, a detachable cover controllingaccess to said chamber, and said chamher being adapted to receive circuit wires extending to said electric heater.

5. A fluid heater of the character described, comprising a plurality of fluid circulatingtubes having ends joined by tube plates, a body of insulating material completely envelopingthe tubes intermediate said plates, another tube extending into and enveloped by said opening and opening outwardly through one of said plates for support of an electric heater to heat said body, headers secured to the tube plates controlling circulation of a fluid to be heated through said tubes, said headers having outwardly extending flanges of greater diameter than the diameter of said body of insulating material, a casing secured to the flanges and enveloping said body to form an insulating chamber therearound, insulation arranged in said chamber, said headers having apertures alined with the ends of said tubes, plates detachable with respect to said headers, said plates having plugged apertures alined with the apertures of the header to facilitate cleaningout of said circulating tubes, one of said headers having an extension forming a. chamber beyond the plate of said header a detachable cover controlling access to said chamber, said chamber being adapted to receive circuit wires extending to said electric heater, and to an aquastat exposed to the heat of said heat conducting body.

6. A fluid heater of the character described, comprising a plurality of fluid circulating tubes having ends joined by tube plates, a body of insulating material completely enveloping the tubes intermediate said plates, another tube extending into and enveloped by said opening and opening outwardly through one of said plates for support of an electric heater to heat said body, headers secured to the tube plates controlling circulation of a'fluid to be heated through said tubes, said headers having outwardly extending flanges of greater diameter than the diameter of said body of insulating material, a casing secured to the flanges and enveloping said body to form an insulating chamber therearound, insulation arranged in said chamber, said headers having apertures alined with the ends of said tubes, plates detachable with respect to said headers, said plates having plugged apertures alined with the apertures of the header to facilitate cleaningout of said circulating tubes, one of said headers having an extension forming a chamber beyond the plate of said header, a detachable cover controlling access to said chamber, said chamber being adapted to receive circuit wires extending to said electric heater, to an aquastat exposed to the heat of said heat conducting body, and an air coil arranged around at least a portion of said heat conducting body and directly exposed to heat radiating from said body.

7. A fluid heater ofthe class described, comprising a body of heat conducting material, means in said body forming a fluid circulating passage, through which a fluid to be heated is adapted to be passed, an air coil outwardly of said body, a casing enveloping the body and coil and spaced with respect thereto, the space of said casing having insulating material therein, a removable chambered member at the upper portion of said body with a removable cap closing the chamber of said member, an electric heating element arranged in said body and having terminal ends extending into said chamber, an aquastat arranged in said body and opening into said chamber, and means for directing circuit wires leading to the heating element and said aquastat out through said heater.

8. A fluid heater of the class described, comprising a body of heat conducting material, means in said body forming a fluid circulating passage, through which a fluid to be heated is adapted to be passed, an air coil outwardly of said body, a casing enveloping the body and coil and spaced with respect thereto, the space of said casing having insulating material therein, a removable chambered member at the upper portion of said body with a removable cap closing the chamber of said member, an electric heating element arranged in said body and having terminal ends extending into said chamber, an aquastat arranged in said body and opening into said chamber, means for directing circuit wires leading to the heating element and said aquastat out through said heater, and said last named means comprising a conduit arranged in the insulation of the casing and opening into a junction box at the lower portion of the casing.

9. A fluid heater of the class described, comprising a body of heat conducting material, means in said body forming a fluid circulating passage, through which a fluid to be heated is adapted to be passed, an air coil outwardly of said body, a casing enveloping the body and coil and spaced with respect thereto, the space of said casing having insulating material therein, a removable chambered member at the upper portion of said body with a removable cap closing the chamber of said member, an electric heating element arranged in said body and having terminal ends extending into said chamber, an aquastat arranged in said body and opening into said chamber, means for directing circuit wires leading to the heating element and said aquastat out through said heater, said first named means comprising a series of tubes extending vertically in said body and opening through upper and lower ends thereof, a header at the lower portion of said body and casing, and said header being divided to form inlet and outlet chambers controlling circulation of fluid through said tubes.

16. A fluid heater of the class described, comprising a body of heat conducting material, means in said body forming a fluid circulating passage, through which a fluid to be heated is adapted to be passed, an air coil outwardly of said body, a casing enveloping the body and coil and spaced with respect thereto, the space of said casing having insulating material therein, a removable chambered member at the upper portion of said body with a removable cap closing the chamber of said member, an electric heating element arranged in said body and having terminal ends extending into said chamber, and aquastat arranged in said body and opening into said chamber, means for directing circuit wires leading to the heating element and said aquastat out through said heater, said first named means comprising a series of tubes extending vertically in said body and opening through upper and lower ends thereof, a header at the lower portion of said body and easing, said header being divided to form inlet and outlet chambers controlling circulation of fluid through said tubes, and means comprising a removable plate for forming a circulating chamber within said chambered member,

NATHAN A. ARVINS.

ABRAHAM A. ARVINTZ.

ROBERT A. ARVINTZ.

References Cited in the file of this patent V UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,985,280 Carleton Dec; 25, 1934 2,421,562 Hynes June 3, 1947 2,576,558 Bede Nov. 27, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1985280 *Sep 12, 1931Dec 25, 1934Nat Electric Heating Company IElectric fluid heater
US2421562 *May 10, 1944Jun 3, 1947Hynes Lee PApparatus for heating oil and other fluid media
US2576558 *Nov 24, 1948Nov 27, 1951Bede James APaint heater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2832417 *Aug 27, 1954Apr 29, 1958Sinclair Oil & Gas CompanyBottom hole igniter and burner
US2907176 *Mar 12, 1956Oct 6, 1959American Messer CorpApparatus for vaporizing normally gaseous material from liquefied form
US3089941 *Jun 27, 1961May 14, 1963Hanau Engineering Co IncWater heater
US3096426 *Apr 3, 1961Jul 2, 1963August Axelson Eskil AndersElectrical paint heater
US3119004 *Dec 12, 1960Jan 21, 1964Serafim M KoukiosFlash chamber
US3159996 *Jun 30, 1961Dec 8, 1964Perkin Elmer CorpHeating apparatus for chromatographic column
US3175075 *Jan 28, 1963Mar 23, 1965Nordson CorpPaint heater
US3209126 *Dec 3, 1962Sep 28, 1965Siemens Elektrogeraete GmbhElectric water heater
US4709135 *Sep 20, 1985Nov 24, 1987Stihler Medizintechnik GmbhDevice to heat infusion and transfusion solutions
US4792661 *Mar 17, 1986Dec 20, 1988Durr Dental Gmbh & Co KgElectric heating apparatus for regulating the temperature of a plurality of liquids
US4866250 *Apr 8, 1986Sep 12, 1989Lacrex Brevetti SaDevice for preheating liquid, particularly liquid fuel
US5570452 *Jan 7, 1994Oct 29, 1996Bollhoff Verfahrenstechnik GmbH & Co., KGFluid heater with main housing and surrounding auxiliary housing defining a pressure resistant compartment therebetween
US7479219 *Aug 5, 2004Jan 20, 2009Guenther RassingerFilter device for fluids and method for filtering fluids
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/495, 392/484, 392/481, 392/482
International ClassificationF24H1/12, F24H1/16
Cooperative ClassificationF24H1/162
European ClassificationF24H1/16B