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Publication numberUS2674318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1954
Filing dateJun 1, 1951
Priority dateJun 1, 1951
Publication numberUS 2674318 A, US 2674318A, US-A-2674318, US2674318 A, US2674318A
InventorsSutliff Wayne N
Original AssigneeSutliff Wayne N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wire line bailer for picking up junk in oil well bores
US 2674318 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1954 w. N. SUTLIFF WIRE LINE BAILER FOR PICKING UP JUNK IN OIL WELL BORES Filed June 1 1951 2- sheets-Shee't l INVENTOR. (JAM/i A 507Z/FF April 6, 1954 w SUTLIFF 2,674,318

WIRE LINE BAILER FOR PICKING UP JUNK IN OIL WELL BDRES Filed June 1, 1951 I 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. [Mom/5 /V, 5072/? Patented Apr. 6, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WIRE LINE BAILER FOR PICKING UP JUNK IN OIL WELL BORES The present invention relates to devices for removing debris from well bores.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved catcher apparatus for entrapping debris in a well bore and removing it to the top of the hole, without danger of any portion of the debris dropping out of the catcher.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved catcher for entrapping debris in a well bore, which is capable of being lowered in the well bore on a wire line, and in which the catcher can be forcibly moved downwardly in the well bore, if necessary to insure the passage of the debris into the catcher.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved check valve or one-way holding device that will allow debris to enter the catcher, but which will automatically close to prevent dropping of the debris from the catcher.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an improved check valve or one-way device that will prevent entrapped debris from dropping from the catcher despite the presence of some debris in the device itself tending to prevent its full closing.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration a form in which it may be embodied. This form is shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. It will now be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal section through a debris catcher embodying the invention, with the upper portion shown partly in elevation, the parts of the device occupying their relative positions while being lowered through a well bore;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1, illustrating the device while being elevated in the well bore;

Fig. 3 is a cross-section taken along the line 3--3 on Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an isometric view of the one-way valve or holding portion of the device;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4, with a portion of the valve device in longitudinal section;

Fig. 6 is a cross-section taken along the line 6-6 on Fig. 2;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6, with the valve disclosed in open position;

Fig. 8 is a longitudinal section taken along the line 8-8 on Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a cross-section taken along the line 99 on Fig. 8.

The debris catcher disclosed in the drawingscan be lowered in the well bore on any suitable running-in string, such as a wire line (not shown). The catcher includes a generally cylindrical chamber or barrel Hi having an upper head II threaded thereinto, and adapted to be closed at its lower portion by a one-way check valve or holding device i2. This check valve is made of a pliant, elastic material, such as natural or synthetic rubber, having its lower portion molded onto a retainer ring or protector l3, which is clamped against the lower end of the barrel [0, by a clamp ring l4 threaded into an adapter sleeve [5 welded, or otherwise suitably secured, to the barrel.

Disposed around the exterior of the lower por tion of the barrel I0, and also around the adapter sleeve I5 and clamp ring 14, is a shoe t6 having a downwardly flaring lower portion IT. The cylindrical sleeve portion I8 of this shoe is slidable along the adapter M and clamp ring I3 and terminates in an inwardly directed flange 19 that is slidable along the outer surface of the barrel or chamber It. The lower portion of the barrel or chamber is provided with a plurality of side ports or holes 28, which are open when the shoe it occupies a lower position with respect to the barrel I0, and which are closed by the shoe flange l9 when the shoe occupies an upper position with respect to the barrel.

. This last-mentioned position is determined by II. A valve head 24 is integral with, or secured to, the lower end of the sinker rod 23 and is disposed within the barrel Ill. This valve head has a plurality of longitudinally extending passages 2441 through which fluid moving upwardly in the barrel can pass, for discharge through bleeder or exhaust ports 25 formed in the barrel it immediately below its head H. A perforated strainer 26 is preferably disposed at the lower end of the valve head 24, being secured thereto by a screw 21.

When the sinker rod 23 and attached head 24 are lowered with respect to the barrel, the exhaust ports are open 25, and any fluid entering the barrel can pass upwardly through the strainer 26 and head passages 24a for outward flow through the exhaust ports 25. When the sinker rod 23 and its attached head 24 are elevated with respect to the barrel [0, the valve head 24 moves over the exhaust ports 25, to close them and also to prevent passage of the well fluid through those ports into the chamber [0.

The shoe 16 may be provided with one or more by-pass ports 28, to allow liquid and possibly comparatively small particles to by-pass the shoe during movement of the apparatus through the well bore. Such particles are small enough as not to be classified as junk or debris that might interfere with the running of other tools in the well bore.

Upwardly inclined baffles 29 may also be provided in the chamber i0, being secured to the barrel and serving to aid in suporting the debris D that might enter the barrel, relieving the oneway valve member 12 of the load of such debris. If desired, however, the bafiles may be omitted, since the one-way valve member is suiiiciently strong to support a full load of debris in the barrel.

The apparatus is run in the well bore, as on the lower end of a wire line, and during such lowering through the well bore, the parts occupy the position illustrated in Fig. 1. in this position, the sinker rod 23 and attached head 24 are shifted downwardly within the barrel 10, to uncover the bleeder or exhaust ports 25 and the shoe I is elevated with respect to the barrel to cover or close the drain holes 20. The fluid in the well bore may by-pass around the shoe l6, some of the fluid entering the flaring portion ll of the shoe passing outwardly through the by-pass ports 28 without entering the barrel or chamber it). of debris and junk encountered in the well bore, however, will pass upwardly against the underside of the check valve I2, opening the latter, in the manner described below, and entering the chamber I0. Liquid or other fluid comingled with the debris can pass upwardly through the strainer 26 and head passages 24a, for discharge through the exhaust ports 25.

When it is desired to remove the apparatus from the well bore, the running-in string is elevated, which shifts the sinker bar 23 upwardly and the valve head 24 across the bleeder ports 25, closing the latter. Such upward movement will also move the shoe it relatively to its lower position, disclosed in Fig. 2, in which the drain holes 20 are open. In view of the one-way characteristics of the valve, it will close upon upward movement of the apparatus; so that any debris D that might be entrapped within the barrel I0 is prevented from dropping therefrom. Dur ing elevation of the apparatus in the well bore, the well fluid is incapable of entering the barrel through the bleeder ports 25, since they are closed. However, any liquid that might be contained within the barrel can drain outwardly through the open bleeder holes 28 at its lower portion. In addition, fluid in the well bore on the exterior of the apparatus can by-pass the apparatus by passing through the shoe ports 28, as

Any large particles When x well as around the lower flaring end I! of the shoe.

When the top of the well bore is reached, the apparatus can be dismantled and the contents of the barrel dumped.

In the event resistance to downward movement is encountered when the equipment is being lowered in the well casing, it is possible to impart an impact blow or jarring action on the barrel Hi, to force its shoe l6 over the debris D, and cause the latter to pass through the check valve [2 and enter the barrel. The resistance to downward movement may result in stopping of the bailer, whereupon, the wire line can be reciprocated, to repeatedly drop the jarring member 22 upon the upper barrel head I l, which will force the shoe 16 over or through the debris. If upward jarring is necessary, the valve head 24 attached to the sinker rod 23 can be elevated to strike a blow against the lower end of the upper barrel head II.

The one-way valve or holding element I2 permits fluid, junk or other debris to enter the bailer, but will preclude its dropping therefrom. In addition, if any debris tends to become stuck in the valve, the latter will close around such debris and still maintain a substantially closed position; so as to prevent the bailer contents from dropping out during elevation of the apparatus in the well bore.

As disclosed in the drawings, the one-way valve or holding device includes a hollow, generally dome-like body 4t that may be of generally ogive shape. The body is disposed around the upwardly projecting rim 4! of the retainer or protector ring !3, with the inner portion 42 of the body disposed along the inner face of the ring. The rubber body 49 is molded, or otherwise suitably secured, to the protector member l3 and its skirt M to provide a secure joint between the two.

Integral with the central, dome-like body portion of the valve element are a plurality of laterally extending ribs 43 that extend outwardly from the axis of the valve member to a point adjacent the outermost portion of the body. The upper ends 44 of the ribs may be substantially at right angles to the axis of the body, and the ribs are each of substantial thickness; so as to reinforce the body and make the entire valve structure capable of supporting a large load of debris D within the chamber or barrel It.

As shown in the drawings, four ribs 43 are disposed in circumferentially spaced relation around the elastic body 40, with their upper portions integral with one another; so as to, in effect, form a cross. Each rib is slotted or severed generally radially of the axis of the valve device, the slot '45 extending downwardly through the body it] to its exterior. Here again, the slots in all of the ribs form a slotted cross.

The rib material inherently tends to contract; so that the valve device occupies the normal position, such as disclosed in Fig. 4, in which the slots '35 are all closed, preventing any material above the valve from dropping thereinto. As a matter of fact, the weight of the material acting on the ribs tends to maintain the slots closed. However, upon debris entering the underside of the valve body, such debris will engage the body M and stretch it outwardly, the rib material 43 on opposite sides of the slot 45 stretching laterally outward, such as disclosed in Fig. 7, to form a relatively wide opening 45a-through which the debris D can pass into the barrel I0 above the valve. If no debris is inside of the body 40, then the rubber or other elastic material from which the valve member is made will contract and revert to its initial shape, disclosed in Figs. 4 and 6, in which the slots 45 are closed.

It is, accordingly, apparent that during downward passage of the apparatus through the well bore, any debris or junk encountered therein will stretch the valve element 12 laterally, to effect its opening, which will allow the debris to enter the catcher chamber l0. When no debris is pressing upwardly on the valve, the member will reassume its closed shape. If, however, some debris happens to be caught in one or more of the slots 45 of the valve body and ribs 43, as during elevation of the apparatus in the well bore, the ribs will close and substantially seal around the particles of debris in the slot 45, and the remainder of the slot portion and the other slots will still contract to their normal closed position. Accordingly, it is evident that despite the fact that some piece of junk or debris might be caught in the valve member, it is not prevented from closing substantially completely, and, as a result, the valve is not held open; preventing all or part of the contents of the bailer to drop therefrom during elevation of the apparatus in the well bore.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A bailer adapted to be lowered in a well bore, including a barrel, a check valve at the lower end or said barrel capable of allowing upward passage of substances through said valve and into said barrel, an upper member telescopically arranged with respect to said barrel, said barrel having a bleeder passage therein, means on said upper member for closing said passage when said member occupies an upper position with respect to said barrel, said barrel having a, drain hole in its lower portion above said check valve, and sleeve valve means slidable with respect to said barrel to close said hole during lowering of said barrel in the well bore and to open said hole during elevation of said barrel in the well bore, said sleeve valve means including Well bore wall engaging means for frietionally engaging the wall of the well bore to cause upward movement of the sleeve valve means to close the drain hole when the barrel is being lowered into a well and downward movement of the sleeve valve means relative to the barrel to open the drain hole when the barrel is being pulled out of the well bore.

2. A bailer adapted to be lowered in a well bore, including a barrel, a check valve at the lower end of said barrel capable of allowing upward passage of substances through said valve and into said barrel, an upper member telescopically arranged with respect to said barrel, said barrel having a bleeder passage therein, means on said upper member for closing said passage when said member occupies an upper position with respect to said barrel, said barrel having a drain hole in its lower portion above said check valve, and a shoe slidable on said barrel to close said hole during lowering of said barrel in the well bore and to open said hole during elevation of said barrel in the well bore, said shoe having well bore engaging means for frictionally engaging the wall of the well bore to cause upward movement of the shoe to close the drain hole when the barrel is being lowered into the well bore and downward movement of the shoe relative to the barrel to open the drain hole when the barrel is being pulled out of the well bore.

3. A bailer adapted to be lowered in a well bore, including a barrel, a check valve at the lower end of said barrel capable of allowing upward passage of substances through said valve and into said barrel, said barrel having a drain hole in its lower portion. above said check valve, and sleeve valve means slidable with respect to said barrel to close said hole during lowering of said barrel in the well bore and to open said hole during elevation of said barrel in the well bore, said sleeve valve means including well bore wall engaging means for frictionally engaging the wall of the well bore to cause upward movement of the sleeve valve means to close the drain hole when the barrel is being lowered into a well and downward movement of the sleeve valve means relative to the barrel to open the drain hole when the barrel is being pulled out of the well bore.

4. A bailer adapted to be lowered in a well bore, including a barrel, a check valve at the lower end of said barrel capable of allowing upward passage of substances through said valve and into said barrel, said barrel having a drain hole in its lower portion above said check valve, and a shoe slidable on said barrel to close said hole during lowering of said barrel in the well bore and to open said hole during elevation of said barrel in the well bore, said shoe having well bore engaging means for frictionally engaging the wall of the well bore to cause upward movement of the shoe to close the drain hole when the barrel is being lowered into the well bore and downward movement of the shoe relative to the barrel to open the drain hole when the barrel is being pulled out of the well bore.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,777,581 Salveson Oct. 7, 1930 1,843,217 Fletcher Feb. 2, 1932 2,000,750 Gates May 7, 1935 2,169,922 Notley Aug. 15, 1939 2,347,988 Burke May 2, 1944 2,525,954 Schabarum Oct. 17, 1950 2,526,021 Fultz Oct. 27, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1777581 *Jul 2, 1927Oct 7, 1930Salveson Elmer FranklinVacuum fishing tool
US1843217 *Mar 24, 1931Feb 2, 1932Fletcher Allen HVacuum sand bailer
US2000750 *May 6, 1933May 7, 1935Gates Paul GBailer
US2169922 *Jan 23, 1939Aug 15, 1939Brauer Machine & Supply CompanWell clean-out bailer
US2347988 *Oct 20, 1943May 2, 1944Burke Ormonde JValve construction
US2525954 *Sep 19, 1947Oct 17, 1950Carl B King Drilling CompanyFishing tool for wells
US2526021 *Jun 18, 1945Oct 17, 1950Fultz Wilford BApparatus for discharging viscous liquids in a well
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2832078 *Oct 17, 1956Apr 29, 1958Battelle Memorial InstituteHeart valve
US2843054 *Jan 7, 1954Jul 15, 1958Shell DevTubing string sand trap
US2874781 *Sep 10, 1956Feb 24, 1959Mcgaffey Edgar WTool for removing foreign matter from a well bore
US3047013 *Mar 22, 1957Jul 31, 1962Baumbach William JDiaphragm for water closets
US3118468 *Apr 20, 1961Jan 21, 1964Gen ElectricResilient material check valve
US3174434 *Jun 24, 1963Mar 23, 1965Tait Mfg Co TheSump pump
US3334646 *Mar 15, 1965Aug 8, 1967Sloan Valve CoVacuum breakers
US3370659 *Jun 21, 1967Feb 27, 1968Germain Gatien PaulDrill rod and bit including one-way valve structure therein
US3565106 *Nov 6, 1968Feb 23, 1971Baumbach William JDiaphragm for flood and suds control
US6568557Mar 12, 2001May 27, 2003Cosco Management, Inc.Spill proof training cup
US6854484 *Jul 31, 2002Feb 15, 2005Infineon Technologies AgValve for a slurry outlet opening of a chemical mechanical polishing device and chemical mechanical polishing device having a valve
US7748385 *May 18, 2004Jul 6, 2010Ric Investments, IncValved holding chamber for use with an aerosol medication delivery system
US8905020 *Feb 24, 2011Dec 9, 2014Allan EagleSpacer and components therefor
US20130291862 *Feb 24, 2011Nov 7, 2013Medical Developments International LimitedSpacer and components therefor
DE19931737C2 *Jul 8, 1999Jun 5, 2003Alfred FrohnertFördergefäß zum Rohrbrunnenbau
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/165, 417/556, 166/150, 137/844, 166/166, 294/86.11, 137/849
International ClassificationE21B31/00, E21B31/08, E21B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B27/00
European ClassificationE21B27/00