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Publication numberUS2674509 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1954
Filing dateApr 15, 1949
Priority dateApr 15, 1949
Publication numberUS 2674509 A, US 2674509A, US-A-2674509, US2674509 A, US2674509A
InventorsBarnet Fred G
Original AssigneeFulton Bag & Cotton Mills
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for protecting food commodities
US 2674509 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1954 F. G. BARNET MEANS FOR PRoTEcTING Foon coMMomTIEzs Filed April l5, 1949 INVENTOR. BY Lu/JE,

@vea/62.4509722921 Patented Apr. 6, 1954 MEANS FOR PROTECTING. FOOD COMMODITIES.

tlon of. Georgia.

Application April: 15, 1949,'Se1ia`l'N6f87Q737 4 Claimsr' (Cl. 3127-31).I

Thepresentxinvention yrelatesgenerally to .bags

adapted-.to 4containcedible1commoditiesfand;morey moisture 'andfodors :of: v:flavors from other.A commodities storedfneareby or linadja'cent.

containers.

There vfare manyA varieties vofA food` commodities whichtend to absorbrodors and'extraneousliiavors' volatilized'f. fromm other: .commodities n which may be-fstored .or .shipped vcontiguous thereto.

examplegfthe odor `and avorof such commodities" or` modify. ythe etrue .e rlavor-l characteristics and commoditiesin. which i absorption 'f aroma for` .-the

has l taken. place. Additionally; such.' absorbent fromfthe .,atmospheric'. air,. especially when the air isr highly humidied. f

In fact, manyfvarieties credible commodities are :commonly shipped,transported,.or .stored in.

textile. bags constructed Kfrom `porousnor. open meShmateriaL-...and inhrder lto protect thecon-r tents .ofsuchbags from .deteriorationfrom moisand odor-,resistant adhesive ever. only. very imperfectly of the. bags .against deterioration fromsuohcon'- tamin'ating influences...` Whi1e...it is desirable-to eiect as `.complete.protection as vpossible for. such, .inv many, instances itis absorptive commodities, inadvisable to.. completely l.seal them.. against all access .to ..air, asisealedfin ,moisture A.will tend to and .the like.. Therefore, it becomes neces-,.

spoil, tlfirough.4 mi1dewing,., rotting, the commodities. sary .for ,maximum .protection of the.` desirabIe ediblef properties. or.. characteristics of... the :commodties topermit..

cess to.the.-.commodities.in .the bags.;

Thereforeewhilengenerally this invention-tree. lates to Idaags afor edible commodities?..itigmoree especiallyv,;isdirectedztoafteietile'ftypewof bagQand.:

prone to become deteriorated by,`

protects. .the lcontents access ..of.. air.. thereto, but to .control .the content.oiwmoistureand/or odoriz. ing contaminants in .such fair. as is. permittedac-l or not with a paper ditioning agents of vthefinvention -for 2,. methodof contro]1ing:.the admissionof-.moisture and air to the commodity contents of saidbag..

Edible commodities ofvaryingtypes are `usually transportedor-shippecl'in cakes. of the'materials, or` if :thematerial is in granular stateenclosedin 'muslinl bags or thei likeiwhich will lbe permeable to thesaid moistureor odorabearing: airs.

A. still further1-object-ofthe inventiony is to* prov-ide sa bag of :the .above-indicated .character Which-'is made-.similar to .a conventional Waterprooftextile `paper-lined. bag, ,except that the adhesive'` layer therefor is stoppeclfshort of the end of the bag that forms modifies-by entrapped moisture.

A still further object of thefinvention is to provide .any type of fabric bag, whether provided the purposes which have Abeen .indicated above.

Further objects :of thezinvention will become apparent .assthe' description Iproceeds, and the features ofunoveltywill be pointed out in particularity `in. the-.appended claims. i

Generally. A speaking;

textile .paperlined fbags, I* and lthat loer-tain 'of lsuch.` commodities, in order.

the amount of moisture 1 contaminationof the bag.

or other liner, with the 'cone the invention conteur".` i platesethea fuses; inrconjunctionz- '.with the. bag 'and artteltzzthe.-l .bag fisrpacked, .ofi.-.adso1'benti materialsv encloseduwithinthe bagesuchmateriais being ac.-4

tivated charcoal, silica gel, or other adsorbent materials, which have the property of adsorbing or occluding moisture odors and the like contaminating constituents which may be present in the air, which materials are to be pla/ced in the form of cakes, or in granulated or powdered form in muslin-type containers, canisters, or such other means as prove, in any given environment the most feasible, for the purpose of adsorbing such moistures and odors as may enter the air chamber or passage provided in the bag, for preventing transmi ting to the commodity content of the bag of excessive moisture or of foreign odors from other commodities such as apples, onions, or similar volatile-yielding commodities which are at times stored in proximity to peanuts, potatoes, or similar commodities in public cold storage or other types of warehouses, as well as ship holds, or similar environments.

The invention will be understood more readily by reference to the accompanying drawing wherein,

Fig. l represents a fragmentary perspective view of an improved bag embodying the featuresy of the present invention with parts broken away.

Fig. 2 is a sectional View taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. l.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, reference numeral l represents an open mesh fabric bag, such as a burlap bag, having a paper lining 2, adhering to the fabric bag i by a layer of waterproof asphalt or other adhesive 3. The lining 2 is shown as terminating short of one end of the bag, such as the top end to provide an air space 4. Said bag is adapted to be closed by' a line of stitching or a `draw-string or other closing means, not shown. The bag is packed with food commodities 5 on which rest a plurality of adsorbent units 6, composed of moistureand odor-adsorbent material such as activated charcoal, silica gel, adsorbent alumina, or the like ill, which may be in the form of compressed units such as cakes or if comminuted, held in muslin bags as shown, or other containers, such as perforated canisters. If desired, the air space may be duplicated at both ends of the bag and the units of adsorbent materials placed in the said air spaces. If commodities which tend to absorb moisture and extraneous odors and are deteriorated thereby are packed in an unlined bag, the adsorbent units may be disposed in sufficient quantities among the interstices of the commodities, which interstices confine air spaces or passages through the commodity content in the bag. The bag has reinforced edges l and 8 stitched along seams 9.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that the invention includes the disposition of moistureand odor-adsorbent units in contiguous proximity to food commodities packed in bags or other containers that are pervious to air containing such components as contaminants for such commodities.

Although in practice it has been found that the form of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawing and referred to in the above ldescription as the preferred embodiment is the most efficient and practical, yet realizing that conditions concurrent with the adoption of the invention will necessarily vary, it is desired to emphasize that various minor changes in details of construction, proportion and arrangement of parts, may 'be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims Without departing from or sacrificing any of the principles of this invention.

Having thus described the invention, what I desire protected by Letters Patent is as set forth in the following claims:

1. An open mesh fabric bag for food commodities tending to deterioration in the presence of moisture and extraneous odors, the bag having a substantially non-porous, airand moistureimpervious continuous lining secured to all interior surfaces of the open-mesh bag and sealing the meshes of the bag against permeation of air and moisture into the interior of the bag through the lining, the said lining however terminating short of one end of the bag to denne a breather air space in the end of the bag through which space ambient atmospheric air may circulate freely, and a plurality of desiccating and deodorizing adsorbent units loosely disposed in the air space for adsorbing moisture and odorsl from air entering the space before it reaches the said commodities.

2. An open mesh fabric bag for food commodities tending to deteriorate in the presence of moisture and extraneous odors, the bag having a continuous substantially non-porous, airand moisture-impervious paper lining permanently adhesively secured to all interior surfaces of the bag and sealing the meshes of the bag against permeation of air and moisture through the lining and fabric of the lined portions of the bag, the said lining however terminating short of one end of the bag to dene an unlined breather air space in an end of the bag through which space ambient atmospheric air is free to circulate substantially unobstructedly through the unlined meshes of the bag at the air space in the bag, the commodities being located in the lined portions o the bag, and desiccating and deodorizing adsorbent material disposed in the air space for adsorbing moisture and odors from air entering the space before it reaches the said commodities, the adsorbent material being contained in air-pervious open-mesh fabric bags loosely disposed substantially uniformly throughout said air space.

3. A container for food commodities, which comprises an open mesh fabric bag, a continuous moistureand air-impervious heavy paper liner permanently adhesively secured to all interior surfaces of the bag and sealing the meshes of the bag and the pores of the fabric of the bag against permeation of air and moisture through the lining and fabric of the line portions of lthe fabric bag, the said lining however terminating short of an end of the bag to provide an unlined breather air space in the end of the bag, through which unlined air space ambient atmospheric air is free to circulate substantially unobstructedly through the unlined meshes oi' the Ibag at the air space in the bag, the airspace being in the upper end of the bag when the bag is filled with commodities to a height coextensive with the liner, and a plurality of moistureand odcrabsorbent units loosely positioned on the commodities and in the said air space for protecting the commodities against moisture and extraneous odors.

4. A container for food commodities, which comprises an open mesh burlap bag, a moistureand air-impervious heavy paper liner permanently adhesively secured to all interior surfaces of the bag and sealing the meshes of the bag and the pores of the burlap of the bag against per'- meation of air and moisture through the'lining and fabric of the lined portions of the bag, the said lining however terminating short of an end Name Date Magee Dec. 7, 1886 Number Number Number Name Date Arkell Aug. 11, 1896 Ellis June 13, 1899 Colgate Nov. 12, 1912 Moyer Apr. 17, 1917 Mastin Apr. 7, 1925 Supplee May 18, 1926 Hruby Sept. 28, 1926 Neusbaum Jan. 24, 1928 McCorkhill May 28, 1940 Flosdorf Dec. 24, 1940 Taylor Mar. 11, 1947 Edelston Jan. 11, 1949 Brady Aug. 28, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain Nov. 26, 1931

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3061549 *Nov 14, 1955Oct 30, 1962Purex Corp LtdPackaged dry bleach and disinfecting compositions
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Classifications
U.S. Classification312/31, 383/116, 206/204, 426/419, 426/124
International ClassificationB65D81/26
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/268
European ClassificationB65D81/26F2