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Publication numberUS2675012 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1954
Filing dateOct 18, 1952
Priority dateOct 18, 1952
Publication numberUS 2675012 A, US 2675012A, US-A-2675012, US2675012 A, US2675012A
InventorsScales Frank J
Original AssigneeScales Frank J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Washing apparatus for automotive and machine parts and assmeblies
US 2675012 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1954 SCALES 2,675,012

WASHING APPARATUS FOR AUTOMOTIVE AND MACHINE PARTS AND ASSEMBLIES Filed Oct. 18, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. FRANK J SCALE-s AT TOR/IE Y5 April 13, 1954 F. J. SCALES 2,675,012

WASHING APPARATUS FOR AUTOMOTIVE AND MACHINE PARTS AND ASSEMBLIES Filed Oct. 18, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. FRA Am J 5041.53

A T TOR/YE Y5 Patented Apr. 13, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WVASHING APPARATUS FOR AUTOMOTIVE AND MACHINE PARTS AND ASSEMBLIES Frank J. Scales, San Jose, Calif.

Application October 18, 1952, Serial No. 315,453

1 11 Claims. The present invention relates to cleaning apparatus, and pertains more particularly to a device for cleaning machine assemblies and parts such as the parts of carburetors for internal combustion engines.

in the cleaning of carburetors it is advisable to use two different types of cleaning liquid. Gne of these is a detergent in which to soak the parts for softening and loosening the film or crust-like coating which forms on the exposed exterior of the carburetor. This coating apparently is a combination of carbon, road dirt, gasoline coloring matter and solidified antiknock components. The other liquid is a solvent for rinsing c the softened coating material and for washing out the interiors and passages of some of the recessed or bored parts. The same general. type of treatment is desirable for cleaning typewriters and typewriter parts.

The type and amount of sludge which is flushed oil by the rinsing liquid, particularly when cleaning carburetor parts, would quickly clog ordinary liquid filters or screens if they were used to filter out the dirt and other impurities in the rinsing liquid. Also, ordinary settling tanks have been found inadequate to properly clarify the rinsing liquid which is used in carburetor cleaning operations, and most settling tanks are difficult to clean out when loaded with sludge or sediment.

The present invention contemplates the provision of improved apparatus for the washing of machine parts. Further, the invention provides a simple, compact parts washing apparatus having an initial soaking tank and a final stream washing arrangement, whereby the cleaning liquids are conserved, and dilution of the contents of the soaking tank by the stream liquid is prevented. A further object of the invention is to provide parts washing apparatus which facilitates the handling and processing of the parts to be cleaned and makes easy the cleaning out of the apparatus when necessary.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, where- Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a parts washer embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view through the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of a settling tray forming part of a liquid clarifying column embodied in the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a standard for supporting a plurality of superposed sludge settling trays of successively decreasing diameters.

In the drawings, a parts cleaning apparatus A comprises a sheet metal cabinet iii having supporting legs H, H, H and access doors l2 and it. If desired, for increased portability, casters or wheels, not shown, may be provided in a well known manner on two or more of the corners of the cabinet Iii. A sheet metal top panel Hi (Figs. 1 and 2) is recessed into the upper end of the cabinet It to have a surrounding flange it which retains liquid which may be spilled onto the top panel M. A rectangular sheet metal soaking tank 51, with a drain faucet IS in its lower end, is mounted in an opening [9 in the top panel it at one side thereof. The tank i1 is secured to the cabinet top panel M by an upstanding seam 28 formed by reversely bending the upper edge portion of each side of the tank outwardly and downwardly to receive upwardly bent flanges it formed on the top panel l4 around the edges of the tank opening 19. The seam 20 preferably is soldered to make a liquid tight joint between the tank I1 and the top panel [4.

A rectangular parts basket 2% is formed with sheet metal side walls 25 and an open mesh bottom 27 which may be of expanded metal. The parts basket 24 is of smaller transverse dimensions than the soaking tank ll so as to fit freely therein, and is provided, at its upper edge, with supporting hooks 28 on one or more sides thereof to hook onto the upstanding seams 20 and support the basket as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The parts basket 24 is of substantially less height than the soaking tank H as shown in Fig. 2, so that with a supply of liquid 29 in the tank ll of sumcient depth to immerse parts 30, indicated in broken lines in Fig. 2, the basket 24 may be raised and secured by the hooks 8 with its perforated bottom 2] and the parts 38 supported thereon above the level of the tank liquid 529 for draining. The basket 24 may be freed from its solid line position of Fig. 2 by raising it to detach the hooks 28 after which it may be lowered to the broken line position 24a shown in Fig. 2 for soaking the parts in the basket.

A second tank 32 for use in the performing of rinsing and drying operations is secured by flush rivets 33 and solder to downturned flanges is formed to surround anopening provided in the cabinet top panel M on the opposite side of the cabinet from the soaking tank ll. The second tank 32 also is provided with a faucet 35 at its lower end through which rinsing liquid 38 may be drained from the tank 32 when desired. The

ing 51 and extends through a side wall of the upper edge of the second tank 32 is mounted flush with the top panel M which preferably is either level or slopes downwardly slightly toward the second tank 32 so that liquid spilled onto the cabinet top panel 14 will tend to drain into the second tank 32.

A funnel shaped drainage partition or bafile 3'! is mounted toextend transversely of the second tank-32 well'belbw its upper edge, and slopes toward a screened central opening 33 in the baffle 37. The bafiie 3! is supported on bracket strips 39 of angle metal which are secured by rivets 4%, one to each wall o'f t-he -seco'ndtank 3 2 at the desired height of the bah-1e;

A perforated parts support shelf 4 I which may be of expanded metal, has 'downturn'ed fianges'42 formed marginally thereon. l li'e'se fiang'es'rest on the bafiie 31 to support the shelf M in vertically spaced relation thereto. The shelf 4! andbafiie 3'l fit freely into the second tank 32 so as to be easily removable therefrom; settling or liquid "claiifyihg b'olu'm'n'ifl is "mounted directly below 'the"'screened"opening *38 in theb'aiile ei. The column "dl-comprisesa central' 'standard' 35 hav- 'A plurality of "'settlin'gftr'ays "'5 l of successively ed onto there 8. riach trayel is provided with larger "diameter than tne sereenedp eninges in theb'afiie 37 so asto' catch thefrinsin'g liquid as it news uewnwaruiy through this opening. Each tra nubportiontahaS ah'o'le 54 (Figt3) axially therein are size freely ftoreceive' the upright standard route. "A' pluralitybf guide lugs '55 are "'sefcuredto the bti'ttdm "or "'the"s"econ'd 'tank"32 to surroundthe base 4'! "whenplaced inthe tank 32 "to facilitate centering "thetrayeolumn Min the tank. A large bottom tray 56' (Figs. 1"an'd'5) of a sizeto fit freely"within therinsingtank 32, is

mounted onthe rests ust above the base l'i.

Api mp' housing 51 (Fi'gfZ) with'a 'u'su'al' pump and electric "drive mdtor, not shown," therein, is 'connected to a Side Willhf the tafik '32 by'a fitting 58. The 'fitting'h is in' the nature of a contank 32 above the maximum contemplated liquid level therein. #A- vent hole 6! is provided in the conduit 59" to prevent any liquid which may tend tense in the conduit from being discharged exshown,-in the lower end of the pump'housingtl,

anda tube 64 leads from the discharge outlet of the pump, through the wall'ofthe tank 32 and is connected to a senii -r-igid tube 65'. The tube 65 is secured to abase flange tiiwwhich inturnis 4 mounted on the cabinet top panel It at the rear of the second tank 32.

To reduce splashing by a stream of liquid discharged therefrom, an aspirating nozzle 67 of a well known type commonly used on household sink faucets is provided on the end of the semirigid tube 65. The nozzle 6? has side openings 59 therein through which air is drawn in a well known manner to mix with the rinsing liquid as it is discharged from the nozzle 67.

A compressed air hose 89 with a manually controlled valve H3 and jet discharge nozzle 1! preferably is providedadjacent the apparatus for blowing excess rinsing liquid from the parts and for evaporating any liquid which may remain thereon after they have been rinsed.

'The'operati0n0f2-the device is as follows: Assume that the conductor wires til, it are connected'to a suitable source of electrical energy, such as, for example, a six volt or other battery, or 110 volt alternatin current. The compressed air hose 68 also is connected to a suitable source of compressed air. A required quantity of suitable detergent liquid 29 is present in the soaking tank 2 3, and a required supply of rinsing liquid 35 is present in the second tank 32, so that with all of the trays 5| filled, a sufiicient amount of the liquid will remain in the pool thereof in the bottom of the second tank 32 to bring the liquid level therein above the screened inlet opening of the pump housing 51, but preferably approximately at, or slightly below the level of the top edge of the rim 52 or" the lowermost settling tray- 53.

A quantity of parts 3! to be cleaned are placed in the basket 24. The basket then is lowered to its broken line'position 2M in the soaking tank I I and is allow-ed to remain there for a length of time sufiicient'to soften the hardened deposits on the parts. The basket 24 then is raised to the solid line position of Fig. 2, with the hooks 28 engaging the upstanding seam 26 to elevate the parts 35 in the basket above the liquid 29 in the soakin tank.

After being allowed to drain fora required length "or" time, the parts are transferred to the second tank 32, either all together in the basket 24, or individually, as desired. If it is desired to transfer the entire first basket of parts into the second tank,.a second similar basket may be provided if desired, so that a second basket of parts may be placed to soak in the soaking tank I! While rinsing and drying the parts in the first basket. The parts in the second tank 32 then are subjected to a rinsing operation by energizing the pump motor, not shown, in'the housing 57 to draw liquid 35 into the pump through the screen 63 and discharge it through the tube 64, the semi-rigid tube 65. and the aspirating nozzle 61.

The parts to be rinsed are. manually presented to the stream of liquid discharged from the nozzle '61, to rinse off the scum and dirt loosened by immersion in the liquid 29 in the soaking tank l1, and tofiushout any hollows or openings in the parts. The parts then are driedby subjecting them to a blast of air from the air nozzle 1 I. .The air-charged stream of liquid from the nozzle 6'! "has little'tendency to splash, "and by holding the parts well downin'the' second tank 32 when rinsing .and'drying thempandby directing the air stream from the air nozzle "I I downwardly, the operators clothes are protected from soiling, This is important since inmost of'the-better carburetor service stations the "service men wear as-long'aspossible.

The liquid discharged by the nozzle 61 against the parts drains down through the perforated shelf 4|, and is deflected by the baflle 31 through the screened central opening 38 therein. Thescreen in the opening 38 is of sufficiently fine mesh to arrest any small screws or springs which inadvertently may be washed down through the openings in the shelf 4|.

The rinsing liquid 36 flows through the screened central opening 38 into the uppermost settling tray 5 la, from which it overflows into successive lower trays, until, from the lowermost tray 56 it overflows into the pool of liquid 36 in the bottom of the tank 32. Since the flow of liquid into the column 44 of trays is relatively slow compared to the total capacity of the trays, and since the crimped or scalloped edgesof the tray rims 52 tend to divide the overflowing liquid into tiny streams, a combined settling and filtering effect is obtained which results in a high degree of clarification of the liquid. The large bottom tray 56 collects a large-portion of the sludge which otherwise would collect on the bottom of the main tank. Thus the liquid may be used and reused for long periods of time, with only the addition of sufficient detergent liquid in the soaking tank l1 and solvent liquid in the second tank 32 to compensate for evaporation and carry over losses.

When the settling trays 5| and 56 become filled with sludge to a point where liquid replacement is considered desirable, the shelf 4| and baffle 3'? are lifted out of the tank 32, and the tray column M is lifted out of the tank 32 in its entirety by means of the lifting ring 58. The tray column i then is disassembled by unscrewing the nut 59 and lifting off the trays 5| and 55. If the detergent in the tank I! is drained at the same time, a stream of solvent from the nozzle 61 may be used to rinse out any sludge or dirt which may be present in the soaking tank After the trays have been removed from the rod 48, they are cleaned out and the drain faucet is opened to drain the old solvent from the second tank 32. The tray column 44 then is reassembled and replaced in the tank 32, and fresh rinsing solvent 36 is sup-plied in sufficient quantity to fill all of the trays 5| and 5'6 and to form a pool 36 in the bottom of the tank 32 to a desired depth. Then, upon replacing the baffle 31 and perforated shelf Al, and refilling the soaking tank IT with detergent liquid to a proper depth, the apparatus again is ready for use.

The invention provides for the quick and easy cleaning of large quantities of carburetor or other parts and assemblies, is easily portable from one location to: another, and is extremely economical, since the washing and rinsing liquid in the second tank 32 remains clear and useable even when the upper one or two trays 5| are completely filled with sludge.

While I have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it will be understood however, that various changes and modifications may be made in the details thereof without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a parts washer having a rinsing tank of substantial depth constructed to form a reservoir in the lower portion thereof, a liquid deflecting baffie disposed transversely of the tank intermediately of its top and bottom, a perforated parts supporting shelf mounted transversely of the tank to overlie the baffle, a series of sedimentation trays mounted in relatively superposed relation with the uppermost thereof disposed to catch liquid deflected by the baffle and disposed to drain successively into one another from the uppermost toward the lowermost thereof, means mounted to discharge liquid downwardly into said tank, and liquid circulating means mounted to draw liquid from the reservoir and to discharge it through said liquid discharge means.

2. In a parts washer having a rinsing tank of substantial depth constructed to form a reservoir in the lower portion thereof, aliquid deflecting baffle having a screened opening therein disposed transversely of the tank intermediately of its top and bottom, a perforated parts supporting shelf mounted transversely of the tank to overlie the baiiie, a series of sedimentation trays mounted in relatively superposed relation with the uppermost thereof disposed to catch liquid deflected by the baffle and disposed to drain successively into one another from the uppermost toward the lowermost thereof, the lowermost of said trays being disposed at a height to drain into the reservoir at the lower end of said tank, a liquid discharge nozzle mounted to discharge liquid downwardly toward said perforated shelf, and liquid circulating means mounted todraw liquid from the reservoir and to discharge it through said nozzle.

3. In a parts washer having a rinsing tank of substantial depth constructed to form a reservoir in the lower portion thereof, a liquid deflecting baifle disposed transversely of the tank intermediately of its top and bottom, a perforated parts supporting shelf mounted in the tank to support parts above said baffle, a series of sedimentation trays each having a mounting lug portion thereon with a hole therethrough, a tray supporting rod mounted to extend upright in the tank and insertible in said tray mounting lugs removabiy to support the trays in relatively superposed relation with the uppermost thereof disposed to catch liquid deflected by the baffle, liquid discharge means mounted to discharge liquid downwardly into said tank, and liquid circulating means mounted to draw liquid from the reservoir and to discharge it through said liquid discharge means.

i. A parts washer comprising a tank adapted to contain liquid to a predetermined depth therein, a parts support mounted to drain into the tank,

a column of relatively superposed sedimentation,

trays mounted in said tank with the uppermost one thereof positioned to catch liquid draining from said parts support, said trays being successively smaller from the bottom to the top of the column thereof, the trays being removable individually in succession from the top downward, and means for circulating liquid from the pool thereof in the tank onto the parts support.

5. An arrangement according to claim 4 wherein each of the trays has a corrugated rim, and wherein each of said trays except the lowermost is arranged to overflow into a lower one of the trays.

6. A parts washer comprising a tank adapted to contain liquid to a predetermined depth therein, a parts support mounted to drain into the tank, a tray support removably mounted in the tank, a plurality of sedimentation trays mounted in relatively superposed relation on said support, means for retaining the support in predetermined gramme z positionzin .theatank, Y with the; uppermostqof ssaid trays :positioned :to catch "liquid draining ;.-f;r,om said parts support, said .tlfiysheing successively smaller from .the bottom to the ltqp thereof, a removable trayretainingqelement releasablyse- ,1

cured on :said support; saidretainingelement .be- .ing constructed to form a handle for'raising-the support with the traysmountedthereonfromthe tank, and means for circulatingliquid from the pool thereof in theitank onto the parts support.

7. A parts washer eomprisinga first tank adapted .to containa supply of detergent liquid to .apredetermined level therein, a parts basket having a perforated bottom insertible -in-said first tank withjthe perforated bottom below the liquid levelin said;first-tank, means for support- :ing the basket in the first tank with the perforated bottom above the liquid level in said first tank, a second tank of substantial depth mounted adjacent the first tank andadapted ,to contain .a supply of solvent liquidtherein, a perforated shelf mounted transversely of the second tank below the upper end thereon a-defiecting battle mounted in the second tank below the perforated shelf to deflect falling liquid toward a predeterpoint: above said secohd tank downwardly into saidseeond tank. v

8. A parts washer comprising a first tank adapted tocontain a supply of detergent liquid to a predeterminedfle'vel therein; a parts basket having a perforatedbottom insertible in said first tank with thepe'rforated bottom'below the liquid level in said first tank, a second tank'of substantial depth mounteduadjacent the first tank and adapted to contain a supply of solvent liquid therein, a screenedfldefiecting baflie mounted in the second tank to deflect falling liquid toward a predetermined 'zone of said .tank,w alplura'lity' of fiaterally offset relatively superposed settling trays mounted in said tankbelow said bafiiejsa'id trays being positioned to receive liquid deflected by the bailie, aliquid pump havingl aninle't. and an eutlet mounted ginl-sa disecond tank with;its-.-in ibelew the liqui leve1 -i. 1 =,$ei s smr d' a ik, and conduit means 9013866113 Q it Out i S i pump todischarge;liquid' from,appinthbove said second ,tank "downwardly -.in.to=lsaid\ second tank. .9.-tA- -p,ar.ts wash r; .omnr-i n g 1a ifran larfiat. liquid-tight; top member 0111 311 fr me, ai IQP member having a pair of :tank receiving openings therein, asoaking tank mounted in ;one of the rqpenings in the top-member to extendlupwardly therefrom, a parts basket having a perforated bottom-insertible in ,said soaking tank, gsuppiqrt ,means mounted :releasably to support ,theparts basket above :a predetermined liquid level .inthe soaking -tank, a rinsing tanklflush-mounted -.the second openingeinvthe top member to contain :a pool of liquid of a predetermined depththerein, -.a perforated shelf mo unted transversely of the grinsing tank intermediate the-d pper ,and lower :ends thereof, a liqu-iddeflectingbaflie having an l opening therein mounted below the perforated shelf, a column-of settling trays mountedbeneath the-opening ,in the deflecting baffle to receive liquid flowing-downwardly therethrou gh,- a liquid "circulating pump mounted in said rinsingitank, said ;pump;having an ,inletand-an outlet, .the inlet being belowja predetermined-.liquid levelin the rinsing tank, drive, meanslfora actuating said 7 pump, a-semi-rigid tube mounted, to, extend above 'said rinsing tank and connected -,-to the 7 pump outlet, and a nozzle fmountedgonthe-discharge end of said semi-rigid tube to maintain the nozzle in adjusted position fordischarging a stream of ,liquid ontoparts in the; rinsing tank.

10. ,"An arrangement according to claim--9 wherein-each settling tray has, a,central boss with an opening therein, and a rod-is mounted on the bottom of ,saidrinsing tank to extend upwardly therefrom, the openings in said trays being of a size to receive the'rod therein. I

11. An arrangement according to .claim 9 wherein the lowermost; settling tray is substantially co-extensive with the clear area of the tank bottom.

References Cited in ,thefile of .this patent UNITED i STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1, 7-3, 008 Gorden 0 ct.'-'-30;'1951 725951838 Fuglie ;-May 6;1-952

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Classifications
U.S. Classification134/85, 210/167.31, 134/182, 210/307, 210/314, 210/476, 134/174, 210/477, 134/99.1, 134/89, 134/135, 210/521, D32/1, 210/416.1, 134/111, 134/91
International ClassificationB08B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/006
European ClassificationB08B3/00M