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Publication numberUS2675531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1954
Filing dateOct 31, 1949
Priority dateOct 31, 1949
Publication numberUS 2675531 A, US 2675531A, US-A-2675531, US2675531 A, US2675531A
InventorsHerman Feldman, Martin Sams
Original AssigneeHerman Feldman, Martin Sams
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector
US 2675531 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1954 M. SAMS ET AL ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 51, 1949 INVENTORQSI Mpzfl'in ,Spms}, J-(erman Eel man,

BY M

ATTORNEYS.

April 13, 1954 M. SAMS ET AL ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR :s Sheets-Sheet? Filed 001;. 31, 1949 INVENTORS.

ATTORNEYS.

o 00 4 H/ /H H 1 a 4 I a m I v r I /w w 6 I I a Patented Apr. 13, 1954 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Martin Sams and Herman Feldman,

Miami Beach, Fla.

Application October 31, 1949, Serial No. 124,526

The present invention relates to a new and improved means and method for readily connecting or disconnecting a conductor to an electrical connector.

An important object of the invention consists in providing an electrical connector, splicer or the like, with simple, efiicient, and economical means for firmly securing a single conductor, cable or double strand conductor having substantially parallel strands or wires to a connector, so that the number of parts and the operational steps are reduced to a minimum and which insures the single conductor, cable wires, and the parallel strands being brought and maintained in firm engagement with the contacts on the connector. Additionally, the connector and the means for securing the single or double wire strand conductor thereto eliminates the necessity of stripping the wire; removing the insulation, or

fastening the wire by external means such as i screws, posts or the like. In other words, the parts of the connector may be formed in one piece and may be molded or otherwise assembled to provide a unitary structure that does not require being taken apart or disassembled, in order to insert the parallel wires, and provides an eificient electrical connection of the wires with the fixed contacts of the connector.

A further object is to provide an electrical connector having a body formed with an opening extending inwardly from one end thereof and defining a first passage. Mounted in the body are spaced contacts having prongsextending inwardly into said passage. Beginning with an aperture in one side of the body there is formed a downwardly and inwardly curved second passage that extends to the said end of the body, said second passage being separated from the first passage by a web that preferably terminates short of the end of the body. The two passages thus lie on the same side of said opening and merge with each other 'at said opening to form a structuralreturn-bend loop. A double strand conductor having the strands of wires substantially parallel and insulated from each other is insertable through the second passage from the 8 Claims. (Cl. 339-100) said aperture to the said opening so as to extend outwardly from the said end of the body and is then bent or looped-by the user to form an end portion which is inserted back into the said opening by the user' so as to be moved axially through the first passage into engagement with the prongs of the fixed contacts in order to establish an electrical circuit therewith. The bent or looped portionof the conductor, when the parts are assembled, conforms to the structural loop formed in the connector body and engases the outer end of the web so as to be completely housed within the connector to insure the parallel strands being maintained in engagement with the fixed contacts. Conversely, the conductor may be readily withdrawn from the connector upon applying pressure to move the strands out of contact with the prongs, and then straightening out the bent portion so that the conductor may be removed through the aperture from the connector. The side of the body opposite to the aperture may be provided with a transverse slot that communicates with the first passage in the body at a point adjacent where the ends of the parallel strands engage the fixed contacts so as to constitute a window for determining the distance the end portion of the conductor should be moved axially within the first passage in order to insure a firm engagement with the fixed contacts, prior to pressure being applied to the conductor to force the bent or looped portion thereof into engagement with the end of the web.

A further object consists in providing a wire splicer with means for readily connecting one or more splicer wires thereto so as to establish an electrical circuit.

Another object consists in providing a new and improved connector for cables and associating with the connector circumferentially spaced fixed contacts arranged to engage the complementary ends of the strands of the cable when the latter is inserted into the connector and thus form an electrical connection therewith. 7

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying claims and drawings.

Referring to the drawings:

- Figure 1 is a perspective view of an electrical connector, such as a plug, constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1 looking in the opposite direction.

Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing the side of the plug opposite to that shown in Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a plan view of the plug.

Figure 5 is a longitudinal central sectional view of the plug showing the first step of inserting the flexible strand conductor into the plug.

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5 showing the second step of bending an intermediate portion-of the conductor to form a loop prior to Figure 9 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially along the line 9-9 of Figure 5.

Figure 10 is a detail perspective view ofthe fixed contact blades and their prongs.

Figure 11 is a sectional side view of a wall showing the electrical plug connected thereto and the connector extending upwardly from the plug. Figure 12 is a view similar to Figure 11 with the connector extending downwardly from the Plug. Figure' 13 is a longitudinal-sectional view of a screw-on extension wall outlet constructed in accordance with the invention. V Figure 14 is a sectional; view taken substantially along the line M-M of Figure" 13. Figure 15 is a sectional view of a bulb socket having the invention associated therewith. Figure 16 is a sectional view taken along the line l6|5 of Figure 15. 1 Figure 17 is a sectional view similar to Figure 5 of a further modification.

Figure 18 is asectional view taken substantially along the line l8-l8 of Figure 17. V

Figure 19 is a perspective view of a single wire connector or plug constructed in accordance with the present invention. I v. v.

Figure 20 is a longitudinal sectional view of Figure 19 showing the wire insertable into the plug so as to establish an electrical circuit there- Figure 21 shows the electrical connectorin the form of a splicer for single wires.

Figure 22 is an enlarged sectional View of Figure 21 showing the wires connected to the splicer. Figure 23 is a perspective view of a splicer for double parallel wires. s 1 Figure 24 is a longitudinal sectional view of Figure 23.

Figure 25 is a longitudinal sectional view taken substantially along the line 2525 of Figure 24:. g Figure 26 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a splicer in the form of a Christmas tree light socket and constructed in accordancewith the present invention. I v Y Figure 27 is a sectional View of the connector in the former a plug for receiving one end of a cable so as to provide an electrical circuit therewith, and :1

Figure 28 is a'transverse sectional view of the cable shown in Figure 27.

Referring to the drawings, 26 indicates a Jonepiece electrical connector, such as a plug or' -the like, which maybe made of plastic, rubber composition .or molded from non-insulating material, and may be opaque, transparent, or translucent, as the best operating conditions require. As shown in Figuresl to 9, inclusive, for the purpose of illustration, the body 29 of the plug is formed of plastic material and the spaced parallel contact blades 2! extend outwardly from one end of the body and have their inner ends 22 (Fig. 10) bent inwardly toward eachother and provided with parallel longitudinally extending prongs or fixed contacts 23. This entire assembly is firmly embedded in the-body 20 duringthe 4 molding operation. The opposite end 24 of the body is preferably shaped as shown in Figure 1, and starting with an opening in said body end has a longitudinal passage 25 extending inwardly thereof a predetermined distance. The prongs 23 extend into the passage 25 and are disposed parallel and in accurate alignment relative to each other. The side 26 of the plug (Fig. 1) is provided starting with anaperture in said side with a downwardly and inwardly curved passage 2] (Fig. 5) which extends to the said body end of the plug and is separated throughout a major portion of its length from the passage 25 by a transverse web 28 formed in the body, and which at its outer end 29 preferably terminates short of the end of the body for a purpose subsequently tobe described. The passages 25 and 2'! lie on thesame side of the opening in the end of the body andmerge with each other at said opening and at the outer end 29 of the web to form as-tructural return-bend loop 30, r

The side-3| of the-service plug 20 opposite the side 26 .has a vertical or transverse slotor opening 32 which communicates with the longitudinal passage 25 so as to constitute a window adjacent the-contact prongs or points for a purpose later to be described. The wall of the passage 25 is preferably formed with diametrically opposed guide ribs 33 (Fig. 9) which extend from the inner end of the passage adjacent the prongs 23 to a point short of the outer end of the passage. As shown, a double strand flexible conductor cord 34 having the Wire strands 35 substantially parallel and separated from each other by the insulation-3S,- which insulation is formed with a volley located between theconductor strands is arranged to be connected or disconnected from the plug or electrical member 20 so as to establish anelectrical contact with the prongs 23. This connection is formed by first cutting the double strand conductor cord at one end, such as 3'5, and extending this end through the passage 21 so that it assumes the position as shown in Figure 5. When a sufiicient length of the cord extends outwardly from the end of the plug, an intermediate portion of the cord is bent to form a loop 38 (Fig. 6) and the end portion 39 which extends inwardly, is manually inserted into the opening at the end of the plug and into the passage 25 until the end 3'5 is moved so as to be visible through the window 32 which indicatesthat the ends of the strands or wires 35 are making firm contact with the 'prongs 23. Manual pressure is then applied to the portion 40 (Fig. 6) of the strand conductor cord that does not extend through the passage 2'! and in the direction of the arrow 41 (Fig. 7) so as to more the loop portion 38 into the loop space formed by th merging of the passage 25 and the passage 2'! at the outer-end 28 of the web so as to provide a recess which-houses the loop portiontB when the latteris moved into engagement with the end 29 of the web 28. This locking movement of the cord simultaneously forces the end 3'5 inwardly into firmer engagement with the prongs 23 to establish an electrical circuit therewith. In other words, it has been found that when axial pressure is applied to secure-the loop firmly in engagement with the web 23, the parallel ends '35 of the strands engaging the contacts 23 are brought into further and firmer engagement with the contact prongs. Conversely, when it is desired to detach the flexible double strand cord 34 from the plug, this is accomplished by first moving the portion- 4}) in .a direction opposite to the arrow 4|, so as to withdraw the loop 38 from the render the plug and then upon straightening out the loop, the cord may be conveniently passed through the curved passage 21 so as to be removed from the plug. As the end portion 39 is initally introduced into the opening of the passage 25, th spaced ribs 33 engage the volley in the insulation of the connector cord 34 between the strands 35 (Fig. 9), so as to constitute a guide that centers the cord and moves and maintains the parallel ends 35 of the strands in proper alignment with the prongs 23 when the parts are assembled.

Thus, it will be seen that a minimum number of steps or operations are required to either connect the flexible conductor cord 34 to the plug 20 or to disconnect the conductor cord therefrom. Moreover, since it has been found that the centers of the parallel strands or Wires 35 of double strand cord conductors of any particular gauge are of substantially uniform distance apart, irrespective of the size or dimensions of the insulating material which separates these wires, we have, by accurately placing the fixed prongs or points 23 at a predetermined distance apart in the passage 25, prcvied means whereby any dou le strand conductor cord having parallel strands may be readily and conveniently connected to the plug 29 or other connector by a means which insures the circuit being established every time the conductor cord is inserted into the plug and at a minimum expenditure of time, ei ort and cost. While the ize and dimensions of the plug 2% and its associated parts are shown arranged to be associated with a double strand conductor cord of the tvpe commercially known as #18, it will be manifest that the size, shape and use of the electrical connector and the the double strand conductor cord may be varied depending upon the particular use and purpose with which the structure is to be used.

In Figure 11, the plug'connector 20 is shown with the blades 2! extending into a socket 43 of a wall 44 and with the side 26 positioned so that the flexible conductor cord 35 extends upwardly from the plug and is spaced from the adjacent side of the wall 4t. In Figure 12, the plug 20 is connected to the Wall socket 3 with the side 28 reversed from the position shown in Figure 11 so that the flexible conductor cord 34 extends downwardly and is spaced from thewall 44, in order that it maybe carried or extended to any suitablepoint of use without danger of twisting or bending the conductor more than is absolutely necessary.

In Figures 13 and 14, there is shown a conventional screw-on external wall outlet member 45 which is arranged to be detachably connected to a wall at by the spaced screws ll. The member 45 has the usual plug socket lfl'and the spaced flexible contacts 529 and 5B which, as shown are bent to form the p gs or pointed contacts-5| and 52 that extend into'a passage 53 from an opening 55 in one side of the member 45. "A passage 5 (Fig, 14) extends downwardly and outwardly so as to merge with the outer end of the passage 53 at the opening 55 and a major portion of the passage 54 is separated fromthe passage 53 by a web 56 that preferably terminates short of the outer end of the opening 55.. The wall of the passage 53 has diametrically spaced opposed ribs 5! and 58 which are flared outwardly as at 59. .It will be noted-that the arrangement of the spaced fixed prongsor. comtactsill and 52-, and =the passages 53;.54- andg55 and their associated parts, are substantially similar to the plug arrangement previously described, so that a double strand conductor cord may be inserted in the passage 54 and bent to form a loop at the opening and then inserted into the passage 53 so as to be brought and maintained in firm contact with the prongs or points 5| and 52 to establish a circuit therewith. The member 45, when detached from the wall 46 and the screws 4'! removed, may be used to constitute a portable connector for attaching the conductor to th member 45 to form a closed circuit therewith.

In the modification shown in Figures 15 and 16, a lamp socket member 60 is shown having the invention associated therewith and is provided with a transverse or lateral passage El which communicates with th threaded socket 62. The terminals 63 and 5d of the lamp contacts are provided with parallel spaced prongs 55 which extend outwardly into the passage 6 l. The bottom 66 of the member 60 has an inwardly and longitudinally curved passage 6'! which communicates with the outer end of the passage SI and is spaced from a major portion of the passage by a web 68. The inner wall of the passage 5! may be provided with the spaced longitudinal guide ribs 69 for receiving the parallel strands of the flexible conductor cord ill when the latter is inserted through the passage 51 and into the passage 6! so as to brin the ends of the parallel strands into contact with the prongs 55 in substantially the same manner as the conductor cord previously described is secured in position. 'In the modification shown in Figures 17 and 18, an electrical connector ll of any suitable type is shown, and has a passage :2 that extends inwardly from one side thereof a limited or predetermined distance short of its opposite side. Mounted in the wall of the closed side of the passage !2 are a pair of parallel spaced points or contact prongs 73 which, as shown, are connected to leads :74 which may be in the form of any suitable conducting material such as contact blades, wires or the like. The wall of the passage 12 has the spaced opposed ribs 15 which constitute guide means that engage the double strand conductor cord that is insertable into the passage so as to form a contact of the parallel wire strands with the points 73. The outer ends of the ribs 15 preferably merge as at 76 into the wall of the passage 72, and one side of the member H may have an aperture or orifice 1! which communicates with the passage l2 adjacent the prongs 13, so as to provide visible means for determinin when the ends of the parallel strands are moved inwardly a sufiicient distance to form a firm electrical contact with the prongs or fixed contacts.

' It will be observed that in all of the above forms of; the invention, the connector is constructed and arranged so that'a double strand conductor In Figure '19, the connector is shown in the of a cylindrical plug body 78 having a passage 19 extending inwardly from one end and a contact 89 extending inwardly from the opposite end of the body. The inner end of the contact 89 is formed with a prong or point SI (Fig. 20) that extends into the passage l9 so as to engage the in- .ner end of the wire 82, when the latter is inserted through a second passage 83 in one side of the body and then into the passage re, that is separated from the second passage by the web 84. A lateral port 85 extends inwardly from one side of the body it and communicates with the passage 19 adjacent the point 8! of the contact 853, so as to provide means for determining the distance the inner end of the wire 82 is to be inserted into the body in order to establish an electrical circuit with the contact.

In Figures 21 and 22, the connector 85 is shown in the form of a wire splicer member having opposed aligned passages and 35 extending inwardly from opposite ends thereof and separated at their inner ends by a wall or partition 89 having a curved intermediate passage 90 and end passages $5 and 52 which are in axial alignment with the openings 8! and 83, respectively. A fixed contact 93 is mounted in the passage 9| and 92 and has its ends .24 extending outwardly into the openings 8? and 83 and preferably pointed as at 95, so as to engage the adjacent ends of the insulated wires 96 and 91'. Adjacent the inner ends of each of the passages 3'! and 28 is a window 98 for determining the distance each of the wires 95 and Si is to be inserted so as to form a proper contact with the points 95.

In Figures 23 to 25, a splicer for double parallel wires is shown, and differs essentially from the splicer in Figure 21 by'being provided with a pair of spaced fixed contacts 99 and me which are positioned in the aligned passages Edi and M32 or" the splicer body H33, and are arranged to be engaged by a double strand, flexible conductor having the wire strands thereof substantially parallel, such as the conductor cord 3% previously described. The walls of the passages [ill and W2 are formed with the tapered ribs 94 that constitute guide means for the double strand conductor cord when the latter is inserted into the splicer H33 through one of the passages I85 and then through one of the passages lei or H32 so as to engage its associated fixed contact. Openings 98 in the splicer body Hi3 adjacent the fixed contacts 5t and its provide visible means for determining. the distance the ends of the conductor wire have to be inserted into the splicer to insure a proper contact therewith.

- In Figure 26, the connector is in the form of a Christmas tree splicer having a body 1 36 provided with a centrally disposed socket iii? having the threaded wall 1138 for receiving the light bulb I03, and which also is provided with a flexible contact, member Hli that extends inwardly into thesocket it]? so as to engage the contact Hi of the light N39. The contact i It is connected to one of a pair of transverse fixed contacts H2 that has its ends H3 projecting into passages He that extend inwardly from opposite sides of the body R06. The body I06 also has inwardly curved spaced passages H5 that communicate with the passages H4 and constitute means for inserting the insulated wires 1 55 into the passages i it so that the ends of the wires :6 may engage the points or prongs H? of the ends H3 of the fixed contacts H2, in order to establish an electrical circuit therewith. The upper side of the bOdy 5535 on opposite sides of the socket in! may be formed with openings H8 which constitute windows for determining the distance the ends of the wires H6 are to be inserted in order to establish a firm electrical circuit with the pair of contacts H2 which may be arranged similar to the contacts 65 (Fig. 16).

In Figure 27, the connector body I20 is constructed and arranged so as to be associated with a cable in order to establish an electrical circuit therewith at a minimum expenditure of time, eiTort and cost. In this form of the invention, the body I23 has a passage l2l extending inwardly a limited distance and positioned in the passage adjacent its inner end in a series of circumferentially spaced fixed contacts 522 which correspond in number with the number of wire strands of the insulated cable. As shown; the cable I23 (Fig. 28) is formed with four spaced strands I24, each of which is enclosed in insulation I25 and the strands are separated from one another by the spacer 426. The contacts I22 are embedded in the body I28 and have their inner ends tapered as at 21, while their outer ends 128 may constitute blades connected to other contacts not shown. The cable 23 initially is inserted through a passage 529 into the body I29 and is then bent as at 36 so that its end portion 13: extends into the passage M5, in order that the exposed wires !24 may firmly engage the aligned fixed prongs I21 of the contacts in to establish an electrical circuit therewith. The passage 29 is separated from the passage l2-l by the web I32 and as the looped portion 53b of the cable is forced inwardly into engagement with the web I32, the inner end of the cable is simultaneously urged into firm engagement with the contacts E22 so as to insure the cable being firmly maintain d in a fixed position when the parts are assembled. An opening I 33 in theside wall of the body I20 adjacent the pointed contacts I 2i provides means for determining the distance the portion I34 of the cable is to be inserted in the passage [2! in order to establish a firm electrical circuit of the cable contacts with the fixed contacts.

It will be understood that the forms of the invention shown and described are merely illustrative and that the connector may assume various shapes, sizes and dimensions as the best operating conditions may require.

We claim:

1. An electrical connector comprising a body, a first passage in said body extending inwardly from an opening in said body, a second passage in said body extending inwardly from an aperture in said body, said passages merging with each other at said opening to form a return-bend loop, the said aperture being one end and the point of merger the other end of. said second passage, the said passages being thereby adapted to receive an insulated wire conductor inserted through said second passage from aperture to opening and thence from said opening through the first passage, and a prong contact in said body extending axially into said first passage and pointing in a direction opposite to the direction of insertion of said conductor in said first passage for electrical circuit engagement with said wire conductor, the said loop constituting means for ion. ing a locking loop in said conductor.

2. The electrical connector of claim 1, in which the loop is inside the connector body.

3. The electrical connector of claim 1, in which said body is provided with an opening co'mmuni eating with said first. passage for determining 9 the distance the end of the conductor is to be inserted into said passage to effect said circuit engagement.

4. An electrical connector comprising a body, a first passage in said body extending inwardly from an opening in said body, a second passage in said body extending inwardly from an aperture in said body, a web in said body separating said passages, said passages merging with each other at the end of the web and at said opening to form a return-bend loop, the said aperture being one end and the point of merger the other end of said second passage, the said passages being thereby adapted to receive an insulated wire conductor inserted through said second passage from aperture to opening and thence from said opening through the first passage, and a prong contact in said body extending axially into said first passage and pointing in a direction opposite to the direction of insertion of said conductor in said first passage for electrical circuit engagement with said wire conductor, the said loop constituting means for forming a locking loop in said conductor.

5. The electrical connector of claim 4, in which the web terminates short of the outer end of the passages whereby the locking loop of the conductor is housed by the connector body.

6. An electrical connector comprising a body, a first passage in said body extending inwardly from an opening in said body, a second passage in said body extending inwardly from an aperture in said body, said passages merging with each other at said opening to form a return-bend loop, the said aperture being one end and the point of merger the other end of said second passage, the said passages being adapted to receive a multistrand conductor cord having the strands substantially parallel and insulated from each other inserted through said second passage from aperture to opening and thence from said opening through the first passage, and a plurality of parallelly spaced prong contacts in said body extending axially into said first passage and pointing in a direction opposite to the direction of insertion of said conductor cord in said first passage for electrical circuit engagement, one prong for each wire strand, with said wire strands of said conductor cord, the said loop constituting means for forming a locking loop in said multistrand conductor.

7. In the electrical connector of claim 6, in which the cord insulation is provided with a valley between the conductor strands, guide means in said first passage located between the prong contacts and arranged to engage the valley between the strands of the conductor and acting to guide the conductor strands through the passage for effecting said electrical circuit engagement.

8. The electrical connector of claim 7, in which said guide means comprises at least one rib projecting into said passage and extending longitudinally thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 761,465 Fielding May 31, 1904 1,599,558 Diehl Sept. 14, 1926 2,050,440 McFadden Aug. 11, 1936 2,301,258 Corlew Nov. 10, 1942 2,308,286 Joyce Jan. 12, 1943 2,353,732 Kingsley July 18, 1944 2,402,766 Moore June 25, 1946 2,466,830 Cook Apr. 12, 1949 2,478,082 Broske Aug. 2, 1949 2,483,351 Richardson Sept. 27, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 263,291 Great Britain Dec. 30, 1926 528,357 Great Britain Oct. 28, 1940

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2742623 *Mar 21, 1955Apr 17, 1956George SkibaCombined male plug and female outlet
US2774950 *Apr 16, 1954Dec 18, 1956Hobson Ervin JElectronic socket
US2810115 *Aug 22, 1955Oct 15, 1957Abbott Developments IncConnectors for lamp cords
US2959763 *Jul 27, 1956Nov 8, 1960Eagle Electric Mfg Co IncElectrical connector
US2993190 *Jul 7, 1958Jul 18, 1961Herman FeldmanElectrical terminal
US3042892 *Feb 4, 1959Jul 3, 1962Hayworth Lester DConnector for antenna lead-in
US3064227 *Sep 17, 1957Nov 13, 1962Herman FeldmanElectrical terminal
US3175176 *Jun 2, 1961Mar 23, 1965Phelon Co IncElectrical connection means in ignition coil unit or the like
US3196379 *Jul 11, 1962Jul 20, 1965Jean FeldmanElectrical connector
US3516047 *Sep 12, 1967Jun 2, 1970Lucas Industries LtdElectrical connectors
US4034284 *Aug 8, 1975Jul 5, 1977Ideal Industries, Inc.Hand-held wall receptacle wiring tester with oppositely disposed push/pull surfaces for insertion and removal of the tester
US4778406 *May 19, 1987Oct 18, 1988Itt CorporationElectrical connector
US5080608 *Jun 6, 1990Jan 14, 1992Yarnton William WElectrical plug connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/427, 439/457, D13/138.1
International ClassificationH01R4/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/2404
European ClassificationH01R4/24A