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Publication numberUS2675697 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1954
Filing dateNov 24, 1950
Publication numberUS 2675697 A, US 2675697A, US-A-2675697, US2675697 A, US2675697A
InventorsJ. T. Quynn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple continuous air sampler
US 2675697 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 20, 1954 J, T. QUYNN ET AL 2,375,697

MULTIPLE CONTINUOUS AIR SAMPLER Filed Nov. 24, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l 1 BY I 1 '11 ATTORNEYS.

April 20, 1954 Filed Nov. 24, 1950 J. T. QUYNN ET AL MULTIPLE CONTINUOUS AIR SAMPLER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS.

April 20, 1954 J. T. QUYNN ET AL ,697

MULTIPLE CONTINUOUS AIR SAMPLER Filed Nov. 24, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS BY I I ATTORNEYS.

Patented Apr. 20, 1954 OFFICE.

MULTIPLE CONTINUOUS AIR SAMPLER John T. Quynn, John S. MeNulty, andLec M. Buchanan, Frederick, Md.

Application November 24, 1950, Serial No. 197,458

1 Claim.

This invention relates to an apparatus designed for use in gathering data concerning various known types of air-borne particulates, the primary object of the invention being to provide a multiple portable apparatus of a flexible type by means of which quantitative as well as qualitative analyses may be made of the concentrates of various types of air-borne particulates over predetermined periods of time, indicating changes in concentrations during equal intervals within the sampling period.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of this character which will collect specimens from which data may be compiled indicating the particle size, and distribution of the particulates that are air-borne and sampled at concurrent intervals with each sample measuring concentrations.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for obtaining specimens of the air of room areas to determine air-borne particulates by causing the air to be directed onto a moving web, particulates in the air being deposited on the web for further examination.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus wherein the webs on which the deposits are made, will be fed through the various sampling heads, intermittently, so that the webs may be stopped and subjected to the air for a period of time to insure the proper quantity of particulates being deposited for a successful examination.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel details of construction and combinations of parts hereinafter more fully described and pointed out in the claim, it being understood that changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.

Referring to the drawings,

Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating an apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmental side elevational view of the apparatus.

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view through one form of vacuum head.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view through a modified form of vacuum head.

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view through a further modified form of vacuum head.

Fig. 6 is a view taken on line 66 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 7 is a view taken on line 1-4 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is a view taken on line 8--8 of Fig. '5. Fig. 9 is a view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 3. Fig. 10 is a view taken on line Ill-I0 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 11 is a view taken on line II-II of Fig. 5.

Referring to the drawings in detail, the apparatus embodies a frame indicated generally by the reference character *5, vuhichirame supports the vacuum heads Ii, I and 8, each of which embodies lower and upper sections, the lower sections being secured at the upper ends of the vacuum pipes 9 that are disposed in openings in the lower bar W of the frame 5.

Coiled springs II surround the vacuum pipes 9 and rest on the upper surface of the lower bar l0, normally urging the'lower sections of the vacuum heads towards the upper sections thereof.

These vacuum pipes 9 are connected with the supporting rod I2 to which the arm I3 is connected, the arm I3 having a right angled end I4 moving in the elongated opening I5 of the lever I6, whereby vertical movement of the lever I6 will tend to rotate the supporting rod I2 and cause the supporting rod ii to move downwardly against the action of the springs II, the springs II acting toreturn the pipes and sections of the vacuum heads supported thereon, to their normal positions with each movement of said rod.

The reference character N indicates the vacuum pump which is driven by the electric motor I8, the vacuum pump I! being in communication with the pipe 9, through the hose I9, pipe 29 and hose 2| As shown by Fig. '1 of the drawings, the pipe 2| extends upwardly through an opening in the lower bar ID of the frame, and terminates at a point adjacent to the upper sections of the vacuum heads I and 8. The reference character 22 indicates a flexible hose which extends from the pipe 20 to the upper section of the vacuum head 8, communicating with the upper section, at one side of the vacuum head, as shown by the drawings.

The flexible pipe or hose 23 also connects with the pipe 20, and extends to the upper section of the vacuum head I, connecting with the upper section of the vacuum head I through the opening 24. The hose 25 connects with the pipe 29 and is in communication with the upper section of the vacuum head I, through the extension 25 at one side thereof.

An extension 21 connects with the hose 28 that also connects with the pipe 20.

Connected with the upper sections of the vacuum heads 6, I and .B, are pipes 29 that extend through openings in the upper :bar 3!! of the frame 5. These pipes are connected by the horizontal rod 3| to which the arm 32 is connected to rotate thereon, the arm 32 having an elongated opening 33 in which the pin 34 from the bracket 35 extends. One end of the arm 32 is pivotally connected with the operating bar 36 that extends downwardly and has pivotal connection with the lever H5, at 31. The operating bar is moved vertically by the bar 38 which is provided with a laterally extended pin 39 that moves through the vertically elongated opening 40 formed in the operating bar 36. One end of the bar 38 moves in the stationary guide 4| and engages the adjusting screw 42 that moves through a threaded opening in the upper'end of the stationary guide, regulating the stroke of the bar 38 thereby regulating the stroke of the operating bar 36. The electric motor 43 has its shaft 44 extended into the reduction gear box 45, the gearing of the gear box operating the cam 45, the construction of the cam 45 being such that the cam 45 rotates slowly.

Extending downwardly from the lever l6, and secured thereto, is the cylinder 41 in which the rod 48 operates, the rod 48 having the transversely disposed end piece 49 that rests on the edge of the cam. The rod 48 is normally forced towards the cam 46, by means of the coiled spring 50 which surrounds the rod and has its ends bearing against the end piece 49 and lower end of the cylinder 41. Thus it will be seen that with each rotation of the cam 45, the outer end of the lever It will be reciprocated or swung vertically to operate the operating bar 36.

An extension pipe forms a part of each pipe 29, and connects with the extensions 52 that extend from the pipe 53 of the sampling air intake manifold 53 which communicates with the atmosphere to draw the atmosphere into the vacuum heads. The reference character 55 indicates films or webs which are constructed of any desirable material, such as filtering cloth or plastic material depending on the tests to be made.

These webs or film strips are rolled in the cartridges 56 and move under the tanks 5'! that contain film or web treating material designed to maintain the specimens in condition for test.

The films or webs move through the guides 58 maintaining the films or webs in their proper positions for feeding through the apparatus.

The webs or films are provided with lines of perforations at their edges, in which the teeth 59 are formed on the periphery of the driving drum 60, the driving drum 63 having the hub 6| on which the ratchet teeth 62 are formed. Mounted on the shaft 63 which supports the drum to, is the pulley 64 over which the belt 65 operates, which belt also operates over the pulley E6 of the guide drum 6'! mounted at one end of the machine and over which the web or film 55 is guided, to the spool 68 which is also provided with the pulley 69 over which the belt 55 operates, to wind the film on the spool. rectly under the stretch of web or film, between the driving drum E3 and guide drum 61, is the electric heater which is designed to maintain the web or film at the desired temperature to preserve the bacteria or germs so that an accurate test may be had.

Pawl H is mounted on one end of the arm 38 and is held against the stop '12, by means of the coiled spring 13, and pawl H engaging the ratchet teeth 62 as the driving drum 60 rotates, thereby moving the outer end of the bar 38 downthe upper section and provide spaces between.

Located diwardly to cause the upper sections of the vacuum or sampling heads 6, 1 and 8, to move down- .wardly into engagement with the webs moving thereunder. It will of course be understood that the cam 46 will be timed in such a way that the lower movable sections of the vacuum or sampling heads 6, I and 8, will be moved upwardly towards the upper sections of the vacuum or sampling heads to positions as shown by Fig. l of the drawings, whereby the sections of the sampling or vacuum heads will be moved against the web or films moving therethrough.

In Sheet 3 of the drawings, are illustrated the various forms of vacuum or sampling heads, and as shown by Fig. 3 of the drawings, the upper and lower sections 14 and 15 respectively, are provided with spaced partitions I6 arranged in parallel spaced relation with respect to each other, the partitions of the sections adapted to align when the sections of the vacuum or sampling heads are brought together against opposite sides of a web or film. The partitions 16 in the lower sections 15, are separated from the bottom IT, by the horizontal partition 18, which horizontal partition is provided with openings 19, so that air drawn into the vacuum or sampling head 6 by the vacuum pump l1, may be drawn directly through the vacuum or sampling head leaving deposits for test on the web or film operating through the vacuum head. In the form of the vacuum or sampling head as shown by Fig. 4 of the drawings, it will be seen that the upper section of the head is provided with parallel spaced partitions 8| with a horizontal perforated bottom 82 arranged therein. Instead of a hollow lower section as in the structure shown by Fig. 3, the lower section of the sampling head is formed to provide an anvil 83. This type of head is used when an impervious or plastic film is used against which the air impinges, the air-borne particulates impinging on the film which is held solidly by the anvil 83, with the result that the air-borne particulates will adhere to the film.

The suction of air through the vacuum or sampling head created by the vacuum pump I1 is through the pipes 26 and 21, which connect with the pipe 20, through hose 23, 25 and 28. The construction of the vacuum or sampling head 8 is somewhat difierent from the previously described vacuum or sampling heads, and as shown, the upper section of this sampling head, indicated by the reference character 84 is provided with vertical partitions 85 and 86, the partition 86 having an upwardly inclined end portion 81- which connects with the upper end of the partition 85 cutting off passage of air entering the upper section, into the compartments formed by the partitions 85 and 85, at the upper ends of the compartments.

Bottom members 88, 89 and 90 are provided in ber 88, and space above the bottom member 89,

so that air-borne particulates of a particular size will be confined to the space under the bottom member 88, while the finer particulates will pass into the space above the bottom member 89 and be drawn from this space, through the opening 93 formed in the bottom member 89. A substantially large opening 94 provides communication between the space below the bottom member 83 and the space above the bottom member 96 so that the suction of air-borne particulates which have not been deposited in the spaces below the bottom members 88 and 89, will be carried into the space above the bottom member 96, from where they will pass into the space below the bottom member 90, through the opening 95, the suction of air continuing through the hose 22 which is fitted over the extension 96 that surrounds the discharge opening 91. The lower section of the vacuum or sampling head 8 is also in the form of an anvil indicated at 98, and provides a support for the web or film passing thereover, the air-borne particulates being forced against the film or web adhering thereto, to be carried from the head and wound on a spool for test.

It will of course be understood that there will be provided a guide drum 6'! and spool 68 for each web or film passing through the apparatus, and the number of these webs and vacuum or sampling heads may be varied without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In operation, the apparatus is positioned in a room, or in a location from which a specimen of the air is to be obtained for the purpose of gathering data concerning all manner and types of air-borne particulates.

The motors of the apparatus are started, and the vacuum pump l'l causes a suction through the vacuum or sample heads. The Webs or films are moved through the space between upper and lower sections of the vacuum heads, and the air is drawn through the vacuum heads depositing the air-borne particulates on the webs, which are wound onto the spools 68.

It will of course be understood that the webs or films are moved through the heads 6, I and 8, with a step by step movement, so that the films remain stationary for a predetermined period, or a length of time suificient to permit the air-borne particulates to be deposited thereon.

After the desired specimens or samples have been obtained, the spools on which the webs or films are wound, may be removed and tests made of the air-borne particulates deposited thereon, to obtain data concerning various types of air-borne particulates.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

In a machine of the class described, a frame, a sampling head mounted on the frame, said sampling head embodying an upper movable section, a centrally located air inlet pipe connected with said upper section, partitions dividing the upper section into spaced parallel passageways, one of said passageways being in direct alignment with said air inlet pipe, an anvil, means for feeding a film strip between the upper section of the sampling head and said anvil said anvil being movable into contact with the upper section of the sampling head temporarily clamping a film strip between the upper movable section and anvil, means for feeding a film strip between the upper section of the sampling head and anvil, means for creating a suction of atmospheric air through said upper section of said sampling head directing air-borne particulates against said film strip operating through the passageways, and spools on which the film strip is wound providing a permanent record for analysis.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification73/863.22, 73/863.92, 55/354, 73/28.4, 73/28.1
International ClassificationG01N1/22
Cooperative ClassificationG01N2001/2223, G01N1/2202
European ClassificationG01N1/22B