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Publication numberUS2676587 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1954
Filing dateJan 28, 1953
Priority dateJan 28, 1953
Publication numberUS 2676587 A, US 2676587A, US-A-2676587, US2676587 A, US2676587A
InventorsLaurence E Corcoran
Original AssigneeLaurence E Corcoran
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Masklike device for toning and reinvigorating facial muscles and tissues
US 2676587 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27, 1954 CORCQRAN 2,676,587

MASKLIKE DEVICE FOR TONING AND REINVIGORATING FACIAL MUSCLES AND TISSUES I Filed Jan. 28, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. Laumncefi Corcoran,

ATTORNEY.

Apr]! 27, 1954 C CQRAN 2,676,587

MASKLIKE DEV FOR INC AND REINVIGORATING FACIAL MUSCLES AND TISSUES Filed Jan. 2 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

Carcvran,

ATTORNEY lightness of" weight,

Patented Apr. 27, 1954 UN [TED STATES PATENT OFFICE MASKL'IKE DEVICE FOR T ONING AND REINVIGORATING FACIAL AND TISSUES MUSCLE'S This inventionrelates to a devicev for toning and: reinvigorating. facial. muscles and tisSuesLby restoring and maintaining theproper circulation of. the blood, thereby to overcome-or. minimize the. sagging of the muscles and the malnutrition ofthe. dermis and epidermis, andto eliminate sallowness and sundry causes of skin blemishes and :disorders.

The inventioniproposes. a device ofmask-like character which effects a regular and. gentle direct" massage ofitheareas. which it. covers and induces: a healthful circulation in adjoining areas.

Theobjects of. the invention'are. to provide a devicev for the purposes stated. which may be economically manufactured, to provide va device of. such structural and. operative character as willinsure convenience and comfort-in use; and to effect amassaging action ,ofoptimum efficiency with the result that after a short period, e; g. two weeks, of daily use for ten or fifteen minutes health is restored tothe starved muscles and tissues in contradistinction to the mere appear.- ance of healthresultant from the daily use of many cosmetic preparations.

With theabove objects in view the device consists generally of. a centering feature and a. massaging feature. The centering feature is ofxrigid character, light weight, and skeleton structure and combines centering and supporting functions- It may be comfortably and conveniently fitted upon the nose and allows entire freedom for breathing through the nose or mouth: The massaging feature is composed of twoylayersgor plies of. suitably flexible sheet material connected in air. sealed relation. along their" margins and formedtoprcvide wings which. cover. the sides of I the face..-gener ally from the-nose tothe ears andffrom lines above the zygomatic ridge to the mandible. The plies are also connected in air sealed relation along various lines of seamelike character within the enclosed areas, these: lines delimiting anuznber of intercommunieating cells having. flexible side walls. The cells as a series are alternately distended and collapsed by con.- nectionto a suitable air pump which operates with pulsating effect. In preferred forms the plies include lower cellular parts which extend over the chin and, preferably, under the mandible and. are in airshow communication with the cells oftherwings. The plies maybe-of any material whichsis impervious to air and suitably flexible.

-Thermoplastic-material such asflexible Vinylite 'is preferred in that it has the advantages of smoothness of surface,

8 Claims. (Cl. 12838) chemical neutrality as exposed to air and applied. to. the; face,.and adequate strength and life.

Inimanualfacesmassage various types of manipulation are practiced. The construction of the device of the invention is such that massagingaotions of parallel character may be provided, a choice; amongthem being oifered. Thus the massagingactionmaybeapplied to the sides of the face. simultaneously, that is to say thecells of. both: wings are simultaneously distended and collapsed; optionally it-may beappliedv to the sides of the. face in. alternation, that is to say duringthe. distention: of the cells of one wing the cells of the other wing are collapsed; and again optionally-the cellsmay be provided in two series in each wing and, the distention. of the cells: of one serieseffected coincidently with the collapse of..- the cells of i the other series. In

, manual massageinany of the types of manipulation the ideal iszan upward movementor lifting of. the muscles. and tissues which promotes healthful circulation in the areas directly massaged and induces-healthful circulation in the forehead and neck. In the device of the. invention this action may be achieved in comparable manner and degree by; having the: longer dimensionsofthecells-in directions between the nose and the ears; The air-sealing cell delimiting; seamswithin the: enclosed areas therefore have their-lengthor major extent: in directions generally from the nose 'to the ears and generally parallel to the zygomatic ridges, maxillaries and mandib1e.-.

With the cells-collapsed the wings, because. of the flexibility of the plies of which they are composed, may conform to thecontour of the face, thereby to- ,havesubstantially uniform contact with the skin; Infitting the device the wings areheldunder. a suitable degree of uniform tension. For this .purpose a number of straps, e. g., three, is preferably'provided'. These, which may be of elastic or non-elastic material, encircle the head-at .differcntelevations and are connected to the wings: at difierent suitably spaced points along their outervertical edges-the upper tapes being lccatedrabovetheears. Thereby the wings are heldthroughout their'areas rather tightly against the skin andwithout liability of downward displacement, a relationship which promotesthe efficacy "of the direct massaging action.

In thedrawings-r Figural is" a' perspective view of the device in a:- formfor'the application of direct massaging'action to the malar regions and to the chin a both above and below the mandible. In the device as shown in this figure the cells of both wings are simultaneously distended and collapsed.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the device in another form in which the cells of each wing may be distended in alternation to the distention of the cells of the other wing.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the device in a third form in which the cells of each wing are provided in two series, the cells of one series being distended in alternation to the distention of the cells of the other series.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the device in a form generally similar to the form shown in Figure 1 but wherein the direct massaging action upon the chin is limited to the area above the mandible.

Figure 5 is a detail horizontal sectional view on the line 5-5 of Figure 1.

Figure 6 is a detail vertical sectional view on the line 6-6 of Figure 1.

Figure 1 is a detail vertical sectional view on the line 'I? of Figure 3.

Figure 8 is a detail sectional view similar to Figure 5 but showing an alternative variation in which the inner ply of each wing is so formed and connected to the centering feature as to provide a cushioning pad to fit against the nose.

Figure 9 is a perspective view of the device in a form in which the centering feature consists of a wire frame and the direct massaging action is limited to the malar region s.

Figure 10 is a perspective view of the frame which constitutes the centering feature of the form shown in Figure 9.

Figure 11 is a detail cross sectional view on the line II-I I of Figure 9.

Figure 12 is a detail vertical sectional view on the line I2I2 of Figure l and showing more particularly the cellular formation of each wing.

This figure assumes that the cells are collapsed and may be taken as fairly representing the cellular structure of all of the several forms shown.

Figure 13 is a detail vertical sectional view corresponding to the section shown in Figure 12 but showing the cells as distended, the side of the face being indicated by a broken line.

Figure 14 is a side elevation of the form of the device shown in Figure 1 as fitted upon the face in readiness for use. This figure may be taken as fairly representing the manner in which all of the forms herein shown are fitted upon the face.

Figure 15 is a perspective view showing another variation in the form of the centering feature.

Referring to Figure 1:

The centering feature is shown at I and the wings of the massaging feature at 2.

The centering feature I is of rigid frame-like character and may have various forms. As shown in Figure 1 it has a fiat front wall 3 and side walls 4 which extend at substantial right angles to the wall 3. The frame is of upwardly tapering outline in general conformity to the upward taper of the nose. The front wall 3 has a nose opening 5 and a bridge piece 6 which may rest upon the bridge of the nose. The vertical extent of the frame is such as to provide for the secure connection and uniform tensioning of the wings. As shown in Figure 1 the lower portion of the frame extends adjacent or slightly beyond the mouth but since the frame is open at its lower end free mouth breathing is permitted, the opening 5 permitting free nose breathing. The frame I may be made of any desired material which is suificiently light in weight, for example light sheet metal such as aluminum or a rigid plastic material such as a rigid Vinylite.

The wings 2 comprise an inner ply 1 (Figure 12) and an outer ply 8, these being preferably composed of flexible Vinylite. In the form shown in Figure l the plies of the wings have downward extensions I0 which are connected below the centering feature by central bow or web portions II, the extensions I0 and bows II providing a part which extends over the chin and, preferably, under the mandible and which may, for convenience, be called a chin strap. The plies I and 8 have continuous air-sealed marginal connection, this connection comprising components I2 and I3 along the upper and lower margins, I4 and I5 along the outer and inner lateral margins, and I6 and I1 along the upper and lower margins of the bows II. When the wings are made of thermoplastic sheet material the marginal air-sealed connection is constituted by welding seams (as clearly shown in Figure 12) which may be formed. by any suitable iron or die. The outer lateral connections I4 are each preferably a pair of welded seams in spaced parallel relation which delimit a sealed-off lateral marginal strip I 8. The pair of seams I4 provide reinforcement for the lateral margins of the wings to which the tensioning force is applied and the strips I8 carry eyelets I9 for the attachment of the tapes 20 by which the device is secured upon the face. Beyond the inner lateral seams I5 the plies are formed with lateral extensions 2| (Figure 5) which are preferably welded together and serve for the attachment of the wings to the side walls 4 of the centering feature I, being turned angularly to lie against the inner faces of the walls 4, When the centering feature I is made of metal the attachment of the extensions 2| to the walls 4 may be effected by lines of stitching 22 (as shown in Figure 1), the Walls 4 having suitable openings for this purpose. When the centering feature is made of rigid thermoplastic material the union of extensions 2| to the walls 4 is effected by welding. Figure 8 illustrates a modification according to which the lateral extension of the inner ply I is of greater width than the lateral extension of the outer ply 8 and is fashioned to provide a sealed-oil bead 23 which may bear against the nose as a cushioning pad.

The manner of securing the device upon the face is shown in Figure 14. This figure assumes separate tapes 20 connected to each of the wings, these being tied together at the back of the head and drawn sufficiently tight to hold the wings under suitable tension. Three tapes are preferably provided whereby tensioning force is applied to the walls at upper, intermediate and lower points, thereby to cause the wings to conform to the contour of the face, and as collapsed, to have substantially uniform contact with the skin. Instead of the tapes 2!] continuous elastic bands may be used with their ends connected to the eyes I8 of both wings. This colorable variation is obvious and illustration is deemed unnecessary.

The inner lateral seams I5 are inclined at an angle which conforms generally to the upward taper of the nose; the outer lateral seams I4 are inclined at an angle which conforms generally to the inclination of the earsythe upper marginal seams I2 extend upwardly along straight lines from points adjacent the bridge of the nose to points slightly beyond the ears; and the lower marginal seams M ami I 1 *gene'rallye ioildvsilzthe OUtI-lhBflfWhBmaindilfli 'The wingswirthus cnnre pietely cover the malar'regions and the. chin strap=comp1etely--covers the-"mandible and the portion of' the china-hove thema'ndible, preferably having a slight extent under the 1 mandible The areas bounded on delilnited by the =marginal seams aretheactive parts of the device-and effect tliemassagingaction. For'this. purpose these areas; irr-ea'clrwing' are=of celluular formati'On:

Inthe-form shown inFigure 1 eachwing'has two cel-ls; namely an=upper-cell*=-2'4 andaa'lower cell25i The chin strap cornposed of eiitensions I0 and bows His -cellularthroughout it's extent as+sufiieiently-'indicated at 25 in" Figure 12; The cells are provided by air-sealed lineeo'i connection betweenthe plies land-8'; these -being the same structurally as the air=sealed marginal lines of" connection ab'oae describedi When'the Wings are made of" flexiblethermoplastic' mate rial the lines of connection".areprov-idedfiywelds which are similar structurallyto' the-welded marginal seams and which, for convenience;may-be called' cell bounding seams: The upper-cell" 24 is' provided in each wing-by the upper marginal seam l2 and a cell bounding seam 2 1; Thelower cell-25- is provided i'n-eachwing' bythe-cell bounding' seam 21'andlowercell bounding seams 28.

The chin strap cell 26 is provided by thecell clination from a point adjacent the upper" end of the innermostseam l i toa-point suitablyshort of' the inner laterahniarginal seam- (5, thereby to provide a cellular passage 29, sufficiently indicated'in Figure 1 betweentheupper oell M and the lower-cell strap as above desoribed it preferred that in each wing' two lower oell-bounding seams 28-be provided, these beingin spaced parallel relation with air seal'ed connections betweentheirends, thereby to delimit a; sealedmfi' inactive strip 36. The seams 28 extend at a suitable upward and outward inclination from points adjacent the lower end" of the inner lateral marginal seamto points suitably short of'the innern'lost' lateral marginal seam Id, thereby-"to -provide-=ar cellular passage 3!, sufliciently indicatedin-Fi'gure'1;be tweenthe lowercell and the chin strap -cell 26. The purpose of providing two'cell boundingseams todelimit the inactive strip 56 is to reinforce the lower ends of'thewings connection with the i;

ries' aniattachment ring? t (Figure 6) 'oifthefsame material which' is welded to the outer: f 'a'ce Qf'" the outer: ply 8, the end' of the tubet't withinitiiecring.

34 being.- open l to I one o'f "thecells; preferably; in

When the device chin thefornrsl-iownm' Eigu-re: 1,.tl'ie.-cell 26: The tube sens connectedi at ritsopposite endi to a; suitable pulsating: device which i may. be a. handt operated infiationbulb. or a-motor drivenpumpconstructed to effect delivery-of air under pressure alternately with the exhaust 0f the air: so: delivered; Such devicesare well known in the industrial arts and may be purchased from industrial 1 supply. houses, their illustration therefore being unnecessary. During the delivery of the=air the cells are distendedand when the air is 'vented the air pressure-'upon tlie inner 'andouter: faces of the walls of-the-cclls i-s 'equ'alizecl' andthe cells are collapsed.

Iirthe-iormshown in Fig-ure 1 in which air: is deliveredto-the cel1 25 the air-flow is simultaneous in bothwings and the chin strap; that is-to say the-cells of botir wings and the chin strap are in alternation simultaneously distended (Figure 13) and'icollapsed (Figurefll). In'the-distention of the cells'ih'theiorm shownin-Figure l the air deiiveryfiow is'throug-hthe cell 26 intothe cells Z'E andthence lnto the'cells-2e, all cells being distended inequal degree-at the same-time The air exhaust flow, ofcourse; isin the opposite-directionandthereuponall the cellsare collapsed.

Referring to-Figure -2-:-

ThefOrm shown in this figure differs from=the form shown in Figure *1 in' that-the cells of each wing-are distended in alternation to the distention'of' 'tlie cells of'the-other wing: In the form shown in'Figure-=1the cel-1 25 is continuous with the-chinstrap; In-the-iorm shown in Figurefl the chin strap bas a central vertical welding 'seanr 35; which extends between its upper and lower-marginal-seams l B and l1 and divides the chin strap into two cells 26a, the seam 35 being functionally an air sealing; partition between the cells"26a-: In this form--'air under pressure is separately delivered to and exhausted from each wing" through-a fiexible-i'tube 33a of thermoplastic" material; These tubes carry-attachment rings 34irwhich' are similar in allrespects to the rings'34: the-ends-of the-tubes within the rings -3'4abeing in'opencommunicationwiththe respecfurth'er'irom theforrnshown-in Figurel in that each wing includes three cells 3B, 31' and 38. whiclraresuficientiy indicated'in Figure 2 and are delimited by-cell=boundingseams 39, 40 and ii: The, upper'cell 36 is located between the upper" marginal seam= I2 and the cell bounding seam 39'; the intermediate cell 31 is located between-the cell-bounding seams 39 and 4c; the lower cell 3fl islocated'between the cell boundis locatedbetweenthe"cell'bounding seam ll and lower marginal seam B3. The chin strap'cellz-fia communicates with .thetcell538 by-a cellular'passage" 42* which-extends adjacent the innermost outer lateralimarginal seam" l 4; the cell 38' communicatesiwith' the" cell 3 7 by" a cellular passage which extends adjacent the inner. lateral marginal seam I5; and the cell 3] communicates with the cell. 36by a cellular' passage Mi which extends": adjacent the innermost outer lateral marginal seam [4. The. cell'b-ounding seams 39 and ii) are preferably provided at. their inner ends with, bafile seams 3211 which are similar structuraily'andfunctionally to the baffle seams 32;; Figure 2'yassumes" thatthe centering feature i is madeofhigi'd"thermoplastic material; e; g. rigid Vinylite; and. that the extensions. 2i v are 'WeidedWmthe" .innervfaces. oi? the. walls 4;

1n thetform shown in Figure, 2 air is. delivered in-alternation totheWings, that is to say when the cells of one wing are distended the cells of the other wings are collapsed. The air delivery flow in each wing is through the cell 25a and in sequence into the cells 38, 31, and 36, all cells being distended in equal degree at the same time. The pulsating pump (not shown) of course, may be of any well known construction which has separate air discharge and exhaust connections to which the tubes 33 are joined.

Referring to Figure 3:

In the forms shown in Figures 1 and 2 the cells of each wing are in a single series. In the form shown in Figure 3 the cells of each wing are in two series and the chin strap is of two-cell construction. Thus the cells of each wing consist of an outer series 45 and an inner series 46 and the chin strap consists of an upper cell 41 and a lower cell 48. The cells are provided in each wing by a tortuous welding seam 49 having components 50 which extend in the general direction of the major facial bones and are connected at their ends by vertical components -5I, the uppermost vertical components 5! extending to the upper marginal welding seams l2. The lower vertical components 5| are joined by a welding seam 52 which has a median location in and along the chin strap and provides a-partition to separate in air sealed relation the chin strap cells 41 and 46. The vertical components 5! are suitably separated from the lateral marginal seams and delimit an outer vertical cellular passage 53 which communicates with the cells 45 and the lower chin strap cell t8 and an inner vertical cellular passage 54 which communicates with the inner cells 46 and the upper chin strap cell 41. 1

In this form air under pressure is separately delivered to and exhausted from each of the two series of cells through flexible tubes 33b of thermoplastic material which carry attachment rings 34?) similar in all respects to the rings 34. One of the tubes 332) communicates directly with the lower chin strap cell 48 and the other tube 33b communicates directly with the upper chin strap cell ll. The tubes 33?) are connected to a pulsating pump of the same kind which is used for activating the device as constructed in accordance with Figure 2. In the form shown in Figure 3 air is delivered in alternation to the two series of cells, that is to say when the outer 1 cells 35 and the lower chin strap cell 48 are distended the inner cells 46 and the upper chin strap 47 are collapsed and vice versa. In this form of the device the face is continuously subject to the massaging impulses, these being applied in alternation to the different areas which are under the cells.

Referring to Figure 4:

The form shown in this figure is structurally the same as the form shown in Figure 1, the only diiierence being that the chin strap is of less vertical depth and does not extend under the mandible.

Referring to Figures 9 and 10:

In this form the device does not include a chin strap and the centering feature is in the form of a wire frame la having a pair of legs 4a connected at their upper ends by a bow or bridge piece 6a. The legs 4a extend along the sides of the nose and have an upward taper which conforms generally to the taper of the nose. The

wings, here designated 2a, have their inner edge completed by welding their terminal'portions to the body of the wings to provide inner lateral marginal welding seams l 511. The space between the legs 4a is unconfined and provides a nose opening corresponding functionally to the nose opening 5. In this construction each wing is shown as having four cells 56, these being provided by cell bounding welded scams 5! which extend from the innermost outer lateral marginal welding seam M to points short of the inner lateral marginal seam l5a, thereby to provide a vertical cellular passage 58 which communicates with the cells. At their inner ends the cell bounding seams 51 terminate in bafile seams 32b structurally and functionally similar to the baflie seams 32. An additional baiile seam 320 may be provided to extend downward from the upper marginal seams l2.

Air under pressure is delivered to and vented from the cells of both wings through a flexible tube 330 terminating in a cross branch 33d which at its ends carries attachment rings 36d corresponding structurally and functionally to the rings 34. The endsof the branch 3303 within the rings 34d are in open communication with the lowermost cells 56. In this form, except for the omission of the chin strap the action is generally similar to the form shown in Figure 1, that is to say the cells are in single series in each wing and are simultaneously distended and collapsed.

Figure 15 shows an alternative variation in the form of the centering feature. This figure shows a centering feature which is preferably made of substantially rigid thermoplastic material and is shaped to have a generally curved cross section. This form has the advantages of extreme lightness of weight and optimum comfort.

Considering the several forms at large the vertical dimensions of the cells are in any case such as to insure that the massaging action, effected by air pressure of the proper degree, is free from discomfort. Generally speaking the vertical dimensions of the cells may be within a range of the order of three-fourths of an inch to the order of two inches and the cells in each wing may, as shown, he provided in various numbers conforming to the range of vertical cell dimensions. Thus in Figure 1 each wing has two cells; in Figure 2 each wing has three cells; in Figure 3 each wing has five cells; and in Figure 9 each wing has four cells. It is preferred that in all cases the lateral walls of the centering feature and their edges be faced with the softer material of the wings in order that the edges be held out of direct contact with the face, comfort being thereby promoted. The air pressure for the distention of the wings may ideally be within a range of the order of one pound per square inch to the order of three pounds. The number of pulsations per minute may be within a general range of from twelve to twenty depending on their duration which, for the best results, may vary from five to three seconds.

The upper tapes 20 extend above the ears and prevent downward movement of the wings along the face. While the preferred material, flexible Vinylite, has a slight measure of elasticity its elastic quality is not'relied upon in the action of the device. Hence the distention of the cells tends to shorten in a relatively slight degree the vertical dimensions of the'wings and the cells as will be apparent from a comparison of Figures 12 and 13,-the contour of a 'side'of the face during the distention of the cells being schematically suggested in Figure 13 by the broken line F. Since the wings are held against downward movement their shortening consequent to the distention of the cells involves upward movements of the cell walls which will effect corresponding upward movements or lifting of the muscles and tissues. The heat for forming the various welding seams is preferably directly applied to the outer ply 8 and the portions of the material of this ply which form parts of the welding seams assume the sectional contour of channels as shown in Figure 12, the portions which provide the outer walls of the cells thereby having a normal spacing of slight degree from the underlying portions of the ply I. Since the marginal edges of both plies are flush the ply 8 is therefore of slightly greater surface area than the ply l. The air under pressure within the cells reacts against both walls. The distention of the outer cell walls is in slightly greater degree than the distention of the inner cell walls. This is for the reason that the outer walls are unopposed by resisting surfaces whereas the distention of the inner walls is opposed by the facial surfaces to which they apply massaging pressure. Due to the shortening in the vertical dimensions of the wings and the cells the massaging action in which the cells apply pressure to the underlying facial areas is comparable in efiicacy to that of a manual massage in which healthful circulation is induced in the areas of the forehead and neck adjacent the areas to which the massaging action is directly applied.

I claim:

1. A mask-like device for toning and reinvigorating facial muscles and tissues comprising, in combination, a rigid frame-like centering feature to fit upon the nose and having side portions which extend along the sides of the nose, a supporting part connecting the side portions and extending above the bridge of the nose and a nose accommodating opening between the side portions, a massaging feature including two wings respectively secured to and extending laterally from the side portions of the centering feature and each composed of two plies of flexible material impervious to air, the plies being continuously connected in air sealed relation along their marginal portions including the marginal portions adjacent the side portions of the centering feature, the wings being of an extent to cover the malar regions of the face from lines extending between points adjacent the bridge of the nose and the ears and lines adjacent the mandible, the wings having lateral margins adjacent the nose and the ears, each wing within its enclosed area having its plies connected in air sealed relation along lines spaced from one another to delimit cells distenclable under air pressure and arranged to provide cellular passages which afford air-flow communication between the cells, tubular means having air sealed connection to the massaging feature and open to the space between the plies for delivering and venting air under pressure which flows through the passages into and from the cells, and means connected to the sealed off lateral marginal portions of the wings to encircle the head and.-

thereby to hold the device upon the face with the wings under tension and. in substantially uniform contact with the skin.

Cir

2. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the plies have downward extensions below the wings and central bow portions connecting the extensions, the upper margins of the bow portions being continuously connected in air sealed relation as a component of the continuously connected air sealed marginal portions of the massa ing feature, the lower margins of the extensions and the bow portions being connected in air sealed relation as further components of the continuously connected air sealed marginal portions of the massaging feature, the downward extensions and the bow portions constituting a chin strap of cellular formation which at each end communicates with one of the cellular passages.

3. A device as set forth in claim 2 wl'ierein the plies are additionally connected in air sealed relation along a vertical line located centrally of the chin strap and extending between the upper and lower margins of the bow portions, thereby to provide the chin strap with two cells, each of which is in communication with a corresponding wing, and the tubular means for delivering and venting air under pressure includes two tubes connected respectively to the cells of the chin strap.

4. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cell delimiting lines of air sealed connections between the plies extend laterally of the wings.

5. A device as set forth in claim 4 wherein the laterally extending lines to delimit cells are provided a parts of tortuous lines extending to the upper margins of the wings and joined at their lower ends to a ply connection in air sealing relation along a line which extends lengthwise of the chin strap midway of its vertical extent and divides the chin strap into upper and lower cells, the tortuous lines dividing each wing into two separated series of intercommunicating cells and being formed to provide marginal vertical cellular passages for communication respectively with the cells of the two series, the cells of the chin strap being in communication with the respective vertical cellular passages, and the tubular means for delivering and venting air under pressure includes two tubes connected respectively to the cells of the chin strap.

6. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the centering feature consists of a rigid frame having its side portions formed as walls and in each wing the plies are formed beyond their air seal connected margins adjacent the centerin feature with extensions which are turned to lie against the inner faces of the walls of the centering feature and are secured to such walls.

7. A device as set forth in claim 6 wherein the extension of the inner ply of each wing has greater extent than the extension of the outer ply and is formed to provide a cushioning bead for contact with the nose.

8. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein each of the lines of connection to delimit cells terminates short, of a marginal line of each wing and the plies are additionally connected in air sealed relation along lines which extend across the terminals of the cell delimiting lines and provide baffles to obstruct the flow of air into and from the cells.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2880721 *Feb 5, 1958Apr 7, 1959Laurence E CorcoranHand or foot carried pulsating massaging device
US3042024 *Jul 11, 1960Jul 3, 1962Emanuel S MendelsonInflatable double-walled resuscitation garment
US3043292 *Jun 26, 1959Jul 10, 1962Emanuel S MendelsonInflatable, double-walled resuscitation garment
US3094118 *Aug 10, 1962Jun 18, 1963Rotary Hospital Equipment CorpFacial massage mask
US3288132 *Nov 1, 1963Nov 29, 1966Anthony Myron LBladder structures useful in therapeutic treatment
US4666148 *Feb 18, 1986May 19, 1987Crawford Johnathan GFacial muscles exercise mask
US4841954 *Oct 23, 1987Jun 27, 1989Klasi, Nirmal S.Oculofacial massager
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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/148
International ClassificationA61H23/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2205/022, A61H2201/1607, A61H9/0078, A61H2201/165
European ClassificationA61H9/00P6