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Publication numberUS2676764 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1954
Filing dateJun 19, 1950
Priority dateJun 19, 1950
Publication numberUS 2676764 A, US 2676764A, US-A-2676764, US2676764 A, US2676764A
InventorsWalter E Aulen
Original AssigneeEddystone Machinery Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Web winder
US 2676764 A
Images(10)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. E. AULEN 2,676,764

WEB WINDER A ril 27, 1954- Filed June 19, 1950. 10 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR ma/5,14% WQQU TTORNEJY'S,

W. E. AULEN April 27, 1954 WEB WINDER 1O Shets-Sheet 2 Filed June 19, I950 w. E. AULE'N April 27, 1954 6 WEB WINDER 10 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 19, 1950 INVENTOR Ap 27, 1954 w. E. AULEN I WEB WINDER 1o Sh eefts-Sheet s Filed me 19, 1950 AORNEYS A ril 27; 1954 w. E. AULEN 7 2 76,764 y 4 WEB WINDER Filed June 19, 1950 10 Sheets-Sheet 6 Egg- INVENTOR w. E. AULEN 2,676,764

WEB WINDER 1o Sheets-Sheet 7 April 27, 1954 Filed June 19. 1950 Z 6 w W 5 /A M m 5 t m 8 m o 0 W. E. AULEN April 27, 1954 WEB WINDER Filed June 19, 1950 10 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR p i 27, 1954 W.- E. AULEN 2,676,764

WEB WINDER Filed June 19, 1950. 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 INVENTOR April 27, 1954' w, E, AULEN 2,676,764

' WEB wn'mER Filed June 19, 1950 1o sheet' -sheet 1o g gza' Patented Apr. 27, 1954 1 T OFFICE WEB WINDER Walter E. Aulen, Newark, Del., assignor to Eddystone Machinery Company, Chester, Pa., a corporation 'of Pennsylvania 7 Application June 19, 1950, Serial No. 168,948

21 Claims. 1

The present invention relates to winding machines for web, commonly known as cloth winders, and to processes of winding web.

The present application is a continuation in part of my U. S. application Serial No. 40,967, filed July 27, 1948, for Web Winder, now abandoned.

A purpose of the invention is to secure more reliable and positive winding of more difiicult web materials, such as the very heavy cloths, the plastic sheet materials and the plastic impregnated cloths which have been hard to wind, using standard equipment and techniques.

A further purpose is to facilitate the starting of the forward cut end of the web ona new shell by employing a moving beltor belts to carry the web around the shell and particularly overthe upper rear portion of the shell.

A further purpose is to mount the threading beltson a transverse arm or arms.

A further purpose is to pivot the rocker support'of the threading belts so that a stretch of belt to contact the shell initially has its forward upper end relatively above the shell and its lower rearward end relatively forward'with respect to its'support of the position it is to occupy in contact with the shell.

A further purpose is to spring urge the stretch of belt relatively upwardly with respect to the position it is to occupy in contact with the shell.

A further purpose is to resiliently tension the belts above and behind the point at which they contact the shell.

A further purpose is to grip the web at spaced points, desirably against the drums, by additional pressure while the web is progressing forward at the time of cutting.

A further purpose is to employ a brake desirably operating on the shaft for the rack gears of the pivot jaw support for the rear shell to exert downward force on the upper jaws, desirably applied through a spring. v W p A further purpose is to bring the brake into pressure-exerting position by lever interconnection with the transfer arms.

A further purpose is to hold thev jaw arms pivotally supporting the roll and the forward shell down by pressure desirably exerted through thrustors at the time of cutting, the thrustors preferably being operated automatically by 'movement of the transferarms into position to bring the threading mechanism against the rear shell.

A further purpose is to bring in the new or rear shell on rearwardly and downwardly directed runners extending to thejaw pivot supports, and

desirably to provide for latching of a shell on the runners by a latch operated from the transfer arms.

A further purpose is to provide tracks for carrying the pivots of the rear shell to the forward drum.

A further purpose is to raise the jaw arms automatically as by thrustors when the knife lowers, to remove the roll from the machine.

A further purpose is to move the jaw arms downwardly automatically as by thrusters when the rear shell is moved forwardly to the forward drum.

A further purpose is to provide release jaws on the jaw arms which are opened desirably by fluid cylinders and which are preferably locked closed by cams at the jaws.

Further purposes appear in the specifications and in the claims.

In the drawings I have chosen to illustrate one only of the numerous embodiments in which my invention may appear, choosing the forms shown from the standpoints of convenience in illustration, satisfactory operation and clear demonstration of the principles involved.

Figures 1 to 10 inclusiveare diagrammatic position views looking from the end, showing the steps in the operation.

Figure 11 is an end elevation, partly in section, of the preferred machine embodying the invention.

Figure 11a is a fragmentary sectional elevation showing the notched wheel and pawl, sectioning away the remaining structure.

Figure 12 is a top plan view of Figure 11, broken at the center to eliminate the intermediate portions of the lengths of the drums and shell.

Figure 13 is a fragmentary end elevation, showing the interconnection between the transfer arms and the latches.

Figure 14;is a fragmentary side elevation of Figure 13.

Figure 15 is a fragmentary enlarged perspective of one set-of threading belts, showing the gate, knife and fingers in raised position.

Figure 16 is an enlarged fragmentary end elevation, showing the brake, and corresponding to a'portion of'Figure 11.

Figure 17 is a fragmentary enlarged view of v Figure 16 sectioned to show the mounting of the brake band on the brake arm.

Figure 18 is an enlarged section of Figure 11 through the brake on the line l8l8.

Figure 19 is a fragmentary enlarged left end elevation of Figure 11, breaking away the interfering structure to show the toggle.

Figure is a circuit diagram useful in explaining the invention.

Figure 21 is a fragmentary enlarged diagrammatic end elevation of the jaws at one end of the pivots of the rear shell.

Figure 22 is a fragmentary e largedside elevation of the gate and an associated switch.

Figure 23 is a fragmentary end elevation of Figure 22.

Figure 24 is an inside side elevation of the jawarm.

Figure 25 is a front elevation of Figure 24.

Figure 26 is a rear elevation 'of Figure '24.

Figure 26a is a fragmentary section on the line 26a26a of Figure 26.

Figure 27 is a view corresponding to Figure24, showing the jaw open.

In the prior art, winding machines for web,

commonly known as cloth winders, have found their greatest application in the winding of standard woven cloth of comparatively light weight and having normal handling characteristics. The operation -'of the machine to transfer shells and rolls has been largely accomplished by hand. With the heavier weights of material and particularly with materials having markedly different handling propertiespsuch as plastics (for example polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloride-acetate, cellulose acetate, cellulose butyrate, cellulose acetate "butyrate, ethyl cellulose, methyl cellulose, rubber, synthetic rubber and the like, as well as the plastic-"impregnated woven materials), it has been found quite difficult to cut the materials, and in many 'instances manual manipulation of the shells and rolls from one position "to another has been tedious, expensive from a labor standpoint and even dangerous. Serious accidents, injurious to workers, have resulted when rolls have gotten out of control, falling-from the machine or'rolling forward unexpectedly. 'The difliculties and hazards involved will be appreciated when it is understood that the weights involved in a single roll are in some cases measured not in hundreds of pounds but in tons.

The difficulties of handling are increased "by the "fact that in the older practice cloth commonly could be made to adhere 'to anew shell by moistening, whereas many of the newer materials do not have improved adherence when moistened, and moistening is harmful "or destructive to some of the webs which are wound.

In accordance with the present invention, the threading of the forwardcut end accomplished in a much more'positive manner by carrying the forward-cut end around the new 's'he'llunder the action :of moving belts. It has been discovered that part of the difiiculty with threading and-also with cutting was that :an .undue am'ount-of slack was created during the cutting operation, on account of the fact that heforecutting theweb the knife carried the web upward :to a considerable distance above its normal position, thuscreating a large amount-of slack material "at the :forward cut end by the time the cutting was'completed. To overcome this the forwardly moving web is gripped, preferably on both sides of the position of cutting, at the time of cutting to hold the web taut. The cutting is accomplished automatically in response to the movement of the threading mechanism into position. The downward motion of the knife at the completion of the cutting also controls the release of the completed roll from the machine so that delay and labor are avoided.

The insertion into the machine of a new shell no longer involves the danger of manipulating the shell above the moving web from the side, since runners are provided and cooperating latches are employed to guide the new shell into the rear position. Likewise the difficulty formerly encountered in carrying the shell and partially completed roll over the gap between the rear and forward drums is avoided by providing a track to carry the shell pivot across this gap, and

providing automatic mechanism. to lower the jaw arms to'receive the shell pivots.

Thefjaw-"arms have opening jaws which release the roll without the need to shift the jaw arms by hand.

Understanding of the operation of the device will'be aided by considering Figures 1 to 10 inclusive before examining the machine in detail.

The'web 30 is passing in the direction of the arrowfrom any suitable source, which may, of course, be a production line, but here is shown as an unwinding roll 3|.

The machine includes a front drum 32 and a rear drum '33 which, as in usual practice, are put side by side at the same height and preferably horizontal and parallel, with a slight space or gap between. The drums are intended to turn in the direction of the arrows (clockwise in Figures 1 to 10) Between the drums is located a gate 34, normally positioned below the top of the drums, but capable of rising above them and carrying at the upper end a knife 35, running longitudinally. The gate is guided for motion upwardly and downwardly as well known.

The web 30 is wound on a shell 36, which at the beginning of the winding, as shown in Figure l, is designated as-a new shell 36' until it is shifted to the forward drum, when it receives the designation 36 to distinguish from the new shell which is lateradd'ed for the next roll.

In the position of Figure 1, the web is winding on the shell 36, which is resting. on and idling with the rear'drum 33. It is assumed that at this point the Web has just been cut and the forward cut end has "just been threaded around the new shell 36','while the old shell and the roll wound thereon have been removed.

Transfer arms 31 are .in their rear position about their pivot shaft 38 above the drums and carry at their lower ends supports 40, on which are mounted belt threading devices 4|.

As seenin Figure 2, the shell 36 winds on the rear drum 3-3 until the roll 32 increases to a substantial size, at which point the shell and the windingroll-are transferred to the forward drum, as shown "in Figure 3, under 'the forward pressure of the transfer arms 31, engaging the back of the 'roll. The Web in this position travels across .at 43 between the drums to the forward drum. -From the'position on top of the forward drum, the roll 42 rolls forward until the pivots 44 on the ends of the shell 36 engage in the jaws 45 of the jaw-arms 46, pivoted at 41 as well known.

The size of the'roll continues to build up on the shell 36 supported 'by'the jaw arms and contacting the forward drum, until the web is cut as shown in Figure 8.

Runways 48 at opposite ends of the machine, extendrearwardly and downwardly from a position above the roll when it is of the size shown in Figure '4 to receive a new shell 36 whose pivots are resting on the runway and held against pre-- mature downward movement by latches. 50, pivoted at above the runways.

The latches 50 are rigidly mountedon pivot shaft 5|, and the shaft 5| carries at its end a crank 52, which pivotally connects at 53 with a link 54 (see also Figures 13 and 14). Link 54 pivotally connectsat 55 to a crank 56 on the. shaft 38, which pivots the transfer arms. In this way the latches are made to move in unison with the transfer arms.

Between the positions of Figures 4 and 5, the

transfer arms and the latches are moved rearwardly permitting the newshell 36 to move down drum 33 and idles with the web as indicated by the arrow in Figure 6.

Between the position of Figures 6 and 7, the roll on the forward drum continues to increase in size until it is wound to the full size. At this point the transfer arms are moved forward until the new shell 36 is contacted by belts of the belt threading device 4|, and at the same position the pressure against the .forward and rear drums above the web is desirably increased as later explained, to hold the web stretched taut at, 43. The knife then moves upward into contact with the web and cuts the web as shown in Figure 8, at the same time desirably directing the new forward edge 51 of the web upward and around the new shell 36 as well known and later described.

As the forward edge 51 travels around the new shell, it comes in under the. belts of the belt threading device 4|, which are travelling with the periphery of the new shell on theupper rear portion thereof. This assures wrapping of the cut end around the new shell to startthe new.

roll. As indicated in Figure 9, while the winding continues on the new shell and the transfer. arms and belts are in the position in which the beltsv continue to contact the roll which is beginningto. wind, the jaw arms 46, preferably automatically,

as later explained, are pushed upwardly to release the shell 36 of the completed roll and allow the completed roll to drop on loading mechanism 58, where it may be carried to a transfer car 60. At any conveniently earlier point, desirablybetween Figures 8 and 9, the knife moves downwardly to its inactive position. Since the jaw arms have released the roll 42, whichhas been completed, they are desirably moved downwardly to the position shown in Figure 10, to receive the new roll when it is wound to the stage shown in Figure 4.

Having considered the diagrammatic vlews of Figures 1 to 10, the mechanism of Figures 11 to.

23 will be taken u to illustrate the structure in more detail.

The machine comprises a frame 62 and standards 53 extending above the same.

64 and the pivots on the shell serve as pivot,

mountings for the roll. The standards 63 have guideways 66 for spring urged pivot jaws 51,-

The frame has journals 64 on which the drums are mountedv which hold the pivots 44 on the'new shell 36 as well known in the art. The upper pivot jaws 61 (Figure 18) are connected with racks 68, which extend vertically in the guideways 66. The downwardly directed pivot jaws are spring urged downwardly by springs not shown. The racks at each end intermesh with the gears 10 on a cross shaft 1|, provided with the usual end wheel 12 and hand brake 13?;(Figure 11) at one end of the machine. The cross shaft 1| is journalled in the standards in any suitable manner'as well known.

. The transfer arms 31 are on the transfer shaft 38, which is journalled at 14 on the standards, and each of the several transfer arms is suitably provided with a pair of belt threading devices 4| on a support 40, extending rearwardly from the ends of the transfer arms. As best seen in Figure 15, each belt threading device is supported on a rocker support 15 of generally triangular shape pivoted to the support 40 at 16 making a pivot mounting for the rollers (Figure 15), near its upper rearward corner and urged upwardly at its upper forward end, and forwardly at its lower end by a tension spring 1! connecting to the support between suitable abutments. Thus the tendency is to raise the fprward end of the belt threading device into a position above the shell, and the lower end to a relative forward position shell.

An endless belt 18 turns on an upper forwardroller 80, a lower rearward roller 8| and an upper rearward roller 82, making a triangular path. With respect to the rocker support 15, the rollers and 8| have stationary axes, but the roller 82 is supported at the outer end of a belt tensioning arm 83, pivoted on the axis of roller 8|, and urged toward the rear from the support by a spring 84 between suitable abutments (Figure 15).

On one of the tensioning rockers 83 is an upward switch operating extension 85 (Figure 11), which closes an electric switch 86 whenever the belts contact the rear shell and urge the tensioning roll 82 forward. The switch 86 when closed actuates valve-operating solenoid 81 (Figure 20) (in series with a normally closed switch 88 in closed position and the normally closed side 80 of a double throwswitch 9| opening a valve 92 to apply high pressure fluid (such as compressed air) through a pipe 93 (Figure 11) to the lower end of a cylinder, having a pistonnot shown, whose rod is operatively fastened to a gate 34, carrying the knife 3 5, suitably consisting of diagonally disposed rearwardly directed teeth. Thus when thesolenoid 81 is energized the high pressure fluid raises the knife carrying gate to a position as shown in 'gFigure 15, cutting the web. As well known in th'e'art, the gate has below the knife, extending across the machine, a finger shaft 95, carrying fingers 96, which tend to spring to a position engaging the top of the new shell under the action of spiral spring 91, and in such position tend to deflect the forward cut end of the web around the shell. In lower position of the gate, the fingers are forced into a vertical positionby a finger cam 98 (Figure 11).

The valve 92 when restored to normal position allows the lower end of the cylinder 94 to exhaust and applies restoring pressure to the top of the cylinder as well known. When the valve shifts to desirable :to hold the web taut against the two drums. A's' faras the rear drum is concerned, this is accomplished by pressing downward at this time on the racks and pivot jaws of the "new shell, so as to force the new shell tightly against the web on the rear'dr-um. The cross shaft 'II hasat one end,- keyed thereon-a brake drum 1 08, which is surrounded by :a brake band =IIlI having friction material P02 (Figures -16 to '18)- Loose on the shaft H on both sides of the bral're'drum are levers i03 which at their outer ends carry a pivot I04. The levers 103 are capab-le 'of moving with respect to the shaft N on which they pivot. On the pivot IIM, at the ends of the levers, is pivotally supported a brake lever I05, having one end of the brake band' IOI secured thereto at I06 between the shaft TI and the pivot I04, and the other end (the one that extends over the top of the brake drum) secured to the brake lever I at -I'I'II outwardly "of the pivot I 04 with respect to the shaft "I I. Thus downward pulling on the end of the brake lever will lock the brake and upward positioning will release the brake, and downward pulling after the brake locks will rotate the shaft H in a direction to exert torque on the gears HI and force the racks B8 and jaws 61 downwardly to force the new shell 36 downwardly. The outer end of the brake lever 105 is normally urged downwardly by a tension spring I 98 from a spring abutment I09 on one Standard. Likewise the end of the brake lever toward the shaft II with respect tothe pivot IE4 is upwardly urged by tension spring -I II) from the standard 63. The levers 1-03 are limited in upward motion by an adjustable stop I I I on the standard, which engages the lever on the side toward the standard.

The transfer arm shaft 38 carries at one end a crank II2 fixe'cl thereon, which makes pivotal connection at Il3 with toggle links I, making pin and slot connection-at -II5 with the brake lever 105. Thus when the transfer arms move to the rear, the effect of the toggle (consisting of the crank I I2 and lever I14) is to release the brake, thus relaxing pressure on the pivot jaws. At the other positions of the transfer arms, the spring I08 applies extra downward pressure on the pivot jaws and on any shell on the back drum. If no shell is on'the back drum, the u per jaws are desirably held in upper position by engaging notched wheel "II' on cross shaft "II by pivoted pawl "H (Figures 11 and l la). The slot at I I5 is long enough to permit the transfer arms to moke to the forward position of Figure 3. When the crank 'I I-2 moves to the position corresponding to rearward limiting travelof the transfer arms, the switch 88 (Figures T6 to 20) which is normally closed, is opened byconta'ct with the crank IIZ, thus cutting "off current from the solenoid valves H6 (Figure 11'') and II"! -(Figure 20) which admit fluid pressure as by a hose to the upper ends of thrust or "cylinders I I8 containing piston and rod combinations "I20. The valves H5 and H1 automatically exhaust when they are not open to admit fluid pressure, as well known. The cylinders are pivoted on the frame at their lower ends 'I2I and at their upper ends are pivotally connected at I 22 to "the respective jaw arms 46. t

In the preferred embodiment as best seen in Figures 24 to 27, the jaw '45 has an open'able jaw portion I19 at the lower forward end which is pivoted at I I9 to the j'aW'a'rm' lB, and reopened by a link I I9 secured to the openable jaw portion H9 at H9 and-pivotally connected at 122 tothe rod of the piston and rod combination I20. The lever -I: I 9 is'urgedby tension spring I 1 9 from the jaw arm in the direction to close the openable jaw portion.

On the stationary part of each jaw there is rigidly mounted at the "back in, Figure 24 a cam H9 (Figure 26 which has a recess H9" and a traok N9 The :pivot I22 between the piston rod I20 and the link H9 carries a roller I19 which rides the cam H9". The downward motion of the jaw arms is limited by adjustable stops 46 which engage abutments on the frame.

When fluid pressure is admitted to the lower ends of cylinders H8 the piston and rod combi nations I20 push up, causing cam rollers I I9 to leave cam :reces'se's II 9 and move to the right in Figure 26 along tracks H9 pushing the links I lil' to the right in Figures 26 and 27 to open movable .ja'wportions I I9. The wound roll then dropsout ofthe-jaws.

When the upward pressure on the piston and rod combinations I20 is released, the jaw portions II9 close under the action of springs II whi-ch pull rollers l I 9 into cam recesses II-EEI and lock the jaw portions I IS in closed position. Th jaw arms then drop under their own weight. At the time of putting, pressure is applied to the tops of piston and rod combinations I20 to apply additional pressure on the forwarcl r'oll.

When the gate move downward as shown in FigureQ, an operator I23 passes by-and inoinentarily shifts switch 91 (Figures 22, 23) moving it from the position 9'3 (closing'thecirouit'in series with the switch 88, Figure 20'), to a new position,

1. closing the contacts I24 an'denergizing-solenoid valves I25 and I25 which momentarily apply fluid pressure to the bottoms of cylinders II8 to urge the jaw arms 'or the movable portions upward for the purpose of releasing the roll. The jaw arms tend to drop by gravity when the front roll is removed. The valves 'II6, -'II-'I, I25 and I26 are of the well known type which automatically exhaust the ends of the cylinders when not open to admit fluid pressure. The opera-tor I23 does not move the switch 9i from the normal position!!!) on upward movement of the gate due to the fact that the operator is pivoted at I21 and yields under the action-of a tension spring I28 on upward movement, but on downward movement is heldin the position shown by a stop I29. The switch 91 is too stiff to be deflected to close on the upward stroke.

It should be noted that when a roll from the back drum is to enter the jaw arms, the jaw arms are down, and'th'e application of fluid pressure to the tops of cylinders I I8 will desirably assure that the jaw arms are in lower position and that their openable portions are closed. The pivots of the shell in moving forward enter the jaws d5 from the back, between jaw sides '45 and 45 (Figure 24-).

The shaft 38 and the transfer arms and belt threading devices are conveniently manipulated fromthe'end offthemach'ine'by a handle I3I (Figures 1 1, 13 and 14) on a crank arm I32 on the shaft 38. A latch I33 is desirably pivoted at I35 ahd'has latching grip 1'35 Within the reach of the operator. The opposite end of the latch engages a latching plunger 136 to permit withdrawing the plunger from a latching recess I3! on the standard when the latching grip is engaged. The latching plunger acts against compression spring I38.

In the prior practice, when the shell has been transferred from the rear to the forward drum,

- mally closed limit 9 it has tended to drop into the space at 43 between the drums. To overcome this a track I40 (Figure. 11) is provided at each end, extending across this space so as to carry the shell pivots from one drum to the next.

As indicated in Figure 20, an alarm device MI is provided with operating switches I42 and I43 (Figure 11) in parallel. The switch, I42 by its operating arm I42, engages the roll on the forward drum and sounds the alarm when the roll reaches a predetermined size for completion. The switch I43, by its operating arm I43 as shown in Figure 21, engages a dog I44 on one upper jaw when the pivot jaws rise to a predetermined level, indicating that the new drum has reached a desired size.

The circuit of Figure connects switches 86 and 88 in series, so that switch 86 will not operate to raise the knife in case it is carelessly manipulated by someone adjustin the shells at a time when switch 88 is open because. the transfer arms are in their rear position.

Contacts 96 of switch 9i are connected in series with switches 88 and 86, when all switches are closed, and these switches are in series with solenoid 81 across the line. Contacts I24 of switch 9| are in series across the line with the two parallel branches in which solenoid valves I25 and I26 are placed. Normally closed switch 88 is in series across the line with the two parallel branches in which solenoid valves I I6 and H1 are placed.

Switch Ill is a two circuit limit switch used to energize solenoids I25 and I 26. As the gate is coming down to its original position after the cutting operation, the operator I23 fastened to the gate (Figure 22) momentarilycontacts the actuating arm of switch 9I (Figure 23), thereby opening the circuit to switch 38 and closing the circuit to solenoids I25 and I26 which will deenergize solenoids of valves I I 6 and I I1 and energize solenoids of valves I25 and I 26 which apply fluid pressure to the bottom of cylinder IIB to urge the jaw arms or the movable portions upward for the purpose of releasing the rolls. After operator I23 completes its cycle, "switch 9I returns to its normal position as shown at 90 on Figure 20,-clos ing the circuit to switch 88. Switch 88. is anorswitch actuated by lever I I2 (Figure 11) and when the solenoids of valves H6 and II! and to complete a circuit to switch 26. The source may be alternating or direct current as desired.

In operation of the device of Figures 11 to 23 it will be understood that in Figure l'with the transfer arm vertical, switch 88 will be open and the jaw arms will not be under pressure. In Figure 2, when the transfer arm moves clear back switch 8.8 remains 913611 and valves H6 and H1 remain closed and connected to exhaust andpressure is off the top and bottom of, the jaw arm cylinders while the shell on the back 'rollfincreases in size. As the roll increases in size when it is being wound on therear drum it raises the pivot jaws and thereby causes shaft 'II to turn' through the rack and gears. When the roll is wound to a predetermined diameter to be transferred from the rear to the front drum; the pawl 'II drops into a notch of notched wheelL'IIand causes the pivot jaws to be held in raised position, thereby also preventing shaft II from turning when the roll leaves the rear drum. Whenthe transfer arms push the new shell and rollon to the front drumin Figure 3, and on to the Jaw arm in i u 4 w ie 8: 5. a a fi seda shell on the. back closed used to energize 10 pressure is again applied to the tops of the jaw arm cylinders, holding them down in position to receive the shell in Figure 4.

When the transfer arms are moved back to the position shown in Figures 5, 6 and 7, switch 88 is again opened and pressure is taken ofi the tops of the jaw arm cylinders as the jaw arms move up when the roll increases. Latches 52 move back with the transfer arm and release the new shell. In Figure 8, for the first time in the cycle, the belts are moved by the machine operator to contact the new shell which has been applied in Figures 4 to 7, closing switch 86 and applying pressure through solenoid valve 81 to the bottom of the gate cylinder. This causes the gate and knife to rise in Figure 8 at the same time downward pressure is applied on the new shell. As soon as the transfer arms are movedback in Figure 9, switch 86 opens under its spring action and the gate moves down under the pressure normally applied to the top of the gate cylinder. On the way down, however, the gate moves switch 9| to close contacts I24 momentarily and this momentarily opens valves I25 and I25 to apply fluid pressure to the bottoms of the jaw arm cylinders to release the roll 42 as shown in Figures 9 and 10.

It will be evident that by the present invention the difliculties in handling very large rolls and very thick materials and the labor and hazards to the workmen are greatly decreased.

It will be evident that by the present invention the threading of difficult materials around a new shell is greatly facilitated so that the machine can operate successfully on very thick and very stiff materials and on materials whose surface characteristics are markedly different from ordinary cloth.. Also, even when operating on ordinary cloth the chance of error in starting the roll on the new shell is greatly reduced.

In accordance with the inventiomit will be evident that the cutting by the knife is made much more positivasince the web is held down on both sides of the line of cutting. Cutting is made automatic in response to the .movement of the threading mechanism in position.

The manipulation of the jaw armsto receive the partially wound, roll, as well as to discharge the fully wound roll, is also made automatic and Jroll engage the top of the rear drum.

I The necessity .of reaching over the moving web to insert the new shell is also avoided, since, in accordance with the invention, the new shell is carried in from the fronton top of the roll which is being wound.

In viewof my invention and disclosure varia- 7 tions and modifications to meet individual whim or particular need will doubtless become .evident to others skilled in the art, to obtain all or part of the benefits of my invention without copying the process and structure shown, and I, therefore, claim all such insofar as they fall within the reasonable spirit and scope'of my claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure byv Letters Patent is:

1,, In a cloth win dena pair of spaced parallel drums and reversing the-direction of the cut aware-4 drums, :means for turning the drums in the :same direction, means for supporting a forward shell in rotatable position while the web is :wound thereon and while'the outer circumferenceof the roll being wound and theiforward shell are idling with the forward drum, a rear-shell positioned in contact with the web above the rear drum and idling with the rear drum, pivot means for supporting the rearshell, aknife, means carried by the knife for cutting the web between the end to make it travel over and around the'rearshell, pivoted transfer arms adapted to move the rear shell to the forward drum when it has been :sufficiently wound and belt mechanism supported on the transfer arms-and in one position of'the transfer arms engaging the upper rearward portionof the rear-shell and moving in thedirection of motion of the adjoining "portion of the circulnference of the rear "shell, thereby aiding in carrying the forward cut edge of the web around the rear shell.

'2. -In a-clothwinding machine,a-pairofspaced parallel drums, means supporting the forward shell in rotatable-position while the web is wound thereon and while the outer circumference of the roll :being wound and the forward shell are idling with the forward drum, a rear shell positioned in contact with the web above the rear drum and idling "with the rear drum, pivot means for supporting the rear shell, knife means and means carried by the knife for cutting the web between the drums and reversing the direction'of the travel over and around the rear shell, pivoted transfer arms adapted to move the rear shell to the forward drum when 'it has been sufficiently wound and belt mechanism supported on the transfer arms and in one position "of the transfer arms engaging the'upper rearward portion of the rear shell and moving in the direction of .motion of the adjoining portion of .the circumference of the rear she'll, thereby aiding in carrying the forward cutiedge of the web around the rear shell, the belt mechanism comprising an endless belt, rollers supporting the 'belt, tension means for urging oneof the rollers to a position to tension the be1t,.and :a pivot mounting for the rollers on one vof the transfer :arms located rearwardly of the rear shell.

3. In a cloth winding machine, a (shell on which a web is about to be wound, a support adapted to move to a 'pos'itionadjoining the shell, an endless belt having a forwardly directed stretchadapted to contact the shell and the web when wound thereon, rollers supporting the belt, tension ,means for .urging one off the rollers Ito "a position to tension the belt, a pivot mounting for V the rollers on the support'locat'ed ,rearwardly of the forward stretch of the b.e'lt,.and spring means urging the upper portion of the forward stretch of the belt upwardly and the lower portion 'of the forward stretch of the belt forwardly with respect to the position occupied when in contact with the shell.

A. In a winding machine for webs, a shell ,having rotatable pivot support, a support for a threading mechanism, a belt rocker pivotally connected to the support and extending forwardly of the pivot point towardthe shell, spring means for urging the upper forward end of the belt rocker upwardly, an upper forward and a lower rearward belt roller pivotally mounted 'on the belt-rocker, a tension arm pivotally mounted for turning the drums in the same direction, a forward shell, means for cut end to :make it y where .it .is extending .over

12. on "the "belt :rocker :and extending :from a "lower .pos'ition to :an'upper rear position, *a tension roller "pivotally mounted on the tension arm at the upper rear position, spring means :urging the tension roller away from the tupper'forward roller andiabelt'aroundthe'rollers.

.5. In a machine .for winding a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal "drums, means for driving the drums in the same direction, means for progressing a 'web across the upper surfaces :of bot-hidruma-means f'or' pivo'tally supporting a forward shell while rolling up the web thereon with the outer circumference of the roll in-contact with the forward drum, and the roll and forward shell idling with the forward :drum, means for pivotally supporting a rearward shell above and in contact-with "the web at a position where it contacts the rear :drum. knife means adapted to move upwardly between the drums and out the webyrack and gear mechanism con- -nected to the pivot :for "the rear shell, a brake drum on the rackand gear mechanism, a brake band on the drum, a brake lever connected to the band, a spring urging the lever to a'position to supply'pressure on the shelLand lever mechanism forreleasingthe spring to apply the spring pressure at the time'of cutting.

6. "In a machine for winding 'a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for driving the-drums in the same direction, means for progressing a web across the upper surfaces of both drums, means for pivotally supporting a forward shell while "rolling'up the'web thereon with the outer circumference of the roll in contact with the forward drum, and the roll and forward shell idling with the forward drum, means for pivotally supporting "a rearward shell above and in contact with the web 'at :a position where it contacts "the rear drum, knife .means adapted 'to move upwardly "between "the drums and cut theweb, rack 'andgear mechanism connected to the pivots of "the rear shell, a brake drum on therackand gear "mechanism, a brake bandon the brake drum, a brake lever connected 'to'the brake band :and "adapted to apply it and to cause rotation of the brake drum, 'a s ring urging the "brake lever toward .the position for applying additional pressure .to .the rear shell, transfer arms pivotally supported above "the rear shell in 'a position (to contact the same, belt threading devices on the transfer arms adapted to contact the rear shell, and .lever mechanism connecting the transfer :arms :to the brake lever to permit the spring to apply pressure to the shell pivots when the belt (threading devices engagetheshell.

7,. In a winding machine :for .a web, apair of spaced horizontal parallel drums, means for rotating the .drums in the same direction, means for carrying a web Igacross the drums, a pivotal 'supportfora forwardishell and for {a roll of web winding thereonsupportedabove and idling with the forward .dru-m, aforward shell, knife means ,for cutting the web between the drums, a rearward shell contact with the .web at a point .the .rear drum, and idling with .the rear .drum, a belt threading device engaging thecircumferenceof the rear shell and automatic means set in motion by the en- ,gagement of the belt threading device with the rear s'he'll forraisingthe'knife.

"8. 'In a winding machine fora web, a pair of s ac'ed'horizontalparallel drums,' means for drivin the drums in the same direction, jaw supports above the rear "drum adapted-to pivotally support a shell, runways extending downwardly and rearwardly to the jaw supports, latches pivoted above the runways and adapted to move from a position in which the latches can hold the pivots of a shell in the runways to a position at which the shell pivots are released, transfer arms for moving a shell from the rear to the 10. In a winding machine for a web, a pair.

of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for driving the drums in the same direction, pivoted jaw arms cooperating with the forward drum to support a shell thereon, pivoted transfer arms for moving a shell from the rear to the forward drum and means including a thruster operated by the forward motion of the transfer arms for moving the jaw arms downwardly before the shell is transferred to the forward drum.

11. In a machine for windin a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for pivotally. supporting the drums, means for driving the drums in the same direction, means for pivotally supportin a forward shell in idling contact with the forward drum and above the forward drum, means for pivotally supporting a rearward shell in idling contact with the rear drum and in some cases with a web movin over the rear drum, a knife normally'positioned between the drums beneath the path of a web travelling across the drums, means for reciprocating the knife upwardly into the path of the web, a resilient clamp operative on the means for pivotally supporting the rearward shell to urge the rearward shell downward from the pivotal support, acting in supplement of any pressure applied by the weight of the parts, and means for applying the resilient clamp pressure on the pivotal supporting means only at the time of cutting.

12. In a machine for winding a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for driving the drums in the same direction, means for pivotally supporting a forward shell in idling relation with the circumference of the forward drum and in some cases with a web riding on the forward drum, means for pivotally supporting a rearward shell in idling relation with the rear drum and in some cases with the web ridin on the the rear drum, a knife positioned between the drums and normally below the path of a web extending across between the drums, means for reciprocating the knife up into the path of the web for cutting the web, means for pushin downward across the forward drum on the means for pivotally supporting the forward shell, and means for actuating the means for pushing downward at a time including the time at which the knife is raised.

13. In a machine for winding a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for driving the drums in the same direction, pivoted jaw arms extending out above the forward drum at either end thereof adapted to support the pivots of a forward shell idling on the forward drum.

, means for pivotally supporting a rearward shell above and in contact with the web at a position where it contacts the rear drum to idle thereon,

a knife between the drums normally positioned below the Web, means for reciprocating the knife upward into the path of the web, fluid pistons operatively connected to the jaw arms for urging the jaw arms downward and urging the forward shell against the forward drum, and means operative at a time including the time of cutting for energizing the fluid pistons.

14. In a machine for winding a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for driving the drum in the same direction, pivoted jaw arms extending out above the forward drum for pivotally supporting a forward shell idling with the forward drum, means for pivotally supporting a rearward shell above and in contact with the web at a position where it contacts th rear drum so that therearward shell idles with-the rear drum, a knife positioned between thedrums and normally beneath a web traveling across between the drums,'means for applying downward pressure supplemental to that exerted by the weight of the parts on the jaw arms, means for actuating the means for applying the downward pressure on the jaw arms "at the time of cutting,

means for applying supplemental pressure in addition to that applied to the weight of the parts on the means for pivotally supporting the rearward shell and means operative to the time of cuttin for energizin the means for applying supplemental downward pressure on the means for pivotally supporting the rearward shell.

15. In a Winding machine for a Web, a pair of Spaced horizontal parallel drums, means for drivin the drums in the same direction, jaw supports above the rear drum adapted to pivotally support a shell, runways extending downwardly and rearwardly to the jaw supports, latches pivotally extending into the runways and adapted to engage and hold the pivots of a shell, the latches moving to a position out of contact with the pivots ofa shell, transfer arms for moving a shell from the rear to the forward drum, and a shell having its pivots resting in the runways and held by the latches.

16. In a winder for a web, a drum adapted to turn, a shell having pivots for winding a roll of web idling with the drum, jaw arms pivotally supporting the shell and roll positioned above the drum, latch means on the jaw arms for releasing the pivots of the shell and fluid mechanism operatively connected to the latch means to release the latch means and concurrently raise the jaw arms.

17. In a winder for a web, a drum adapted to turn, a shell for winding a roll of web idling with the drum and having pivots, jaw arms pivotally supporting the shell and roll and engaging the pivots of the shell, a gate extending longitudinally of and behind the drum and reciprocable vertically, a knife mounted on the gate extending longitudinally of and behind the drum for cutting the web before it reaches the roll, latch means on the jaw arms for releasing the pivots of the shell, thruster means operatively connected to the jaw arms and to the latch means for releasing the latch means and raising the jaw arms and automatic mechanism operated by the gate to energize the thrustor means.

18. In a machine for winding a web, a pair of spaced parallel horizontal drums, means for pivotally supporting an idling shell resting upon one of the drums to wind a web on that drum, means for pivotally supporting an idling shell transferredv to; the; other;- drum. and. resting; upon the; same to wind: at web; 0111 they other drum. a knife: normally' positioned-z below the. web and. between. the drums, means for: reciprocatingv the knife: upward. into= engagement with. the web as it. is progressed, means for applying. pressure additional to; the pressure: applied; by the weight oh the parts-toshelIsidling. on both of the drums, means; for. actuating. the means for applying. ad.- ditional pressure to. the shell on. the: forward drumprior to r-aising theknifeand automatic means-coordinated with the raising" of the knife for actuating the means for applying additional pressure to the-shell.- on therear drum.

1-9.. In: a; machine forwinding a web, a pair. of spaced parallelhorizontal drums. means for driving; the drums.- in. the same direction, means for pivotally supporting a forward. shell idling ahoveandin cooperation with. the surface ofthe {or-ward drum, means. for pivotally supportinga. rearward shellwhile. idling aboveand. in cooper-ative: relation with: the. surface of the rear drum, a; knife normally positioned between. the

drums and v below a; web winding on the drums,

means for reciprocating the} knife upwardly into contact with the web to cutthe web,, resilient means. for applying pressure tor the pivotal supportzof the rearshellin addition to any. pressure appliedby the weight of the parts to increase the rolling pressure. of the; idling. rear shell, on

the; rear drum, and means ooordinatingwiththe raising or the k-nifefor actuating the means for applying additional press-uretothe rear shell.

20.1w a cloth winder; a horizontal rotatable drum,v a. pair of. law arms.- Qivotally supported above the-:drum on. an axis parallel torthe-drum axis, the jaw; arms having. at. their lower, ends jaw portions adapted-topivot. a shell onadrum and oneof the-Jaw. arms having at lowerv swingable; latch portion! pivotally: mounted on. the; jaw arm and adapted. to; release the shellpivot, and fluid means operatively connected to, the jaw arms and to the. latch. port-ion" andwhen energized raising the. jaw arms. and. opening. the latch portiorn whereby a; shell. pivoted in. the. jaws. is discharged.

21..v In a cloth winden. a drum pivotally mounted-1, ona horizontal axis, a pair of pivoted jaw arms extending over the-drum and movable uprand down with. respect to the drum, stationa-ry' jaw portions on the lower ends of the jaw arms; a movable jaw portion pivotally mounted on the lower sideon: one of. the jaw arms, the stationary jaw portions. and the movable jaw portion cooperating; to-pivot a shell on the drum, cam means including an upwardly opening latch for holding the. movable jaw portion locked closed. and fluidv means operatively connected. to the jaw arms and to the movable. jaw portion and the cammeansjor raising. the jaw arms and opening. themovablejaw. portion.

References Cited in the me of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 6703187 Simpson Mar. 19; 1901 85931 91- Ballard' July 9, 1907 1,2113185 Leathem Jan. 2, 191'? 1,979,268 Batchelder Mar. 1, 1921 1'-,4'4 1,359 Langston Jan. 9, 1923 1%6201007 Cameron Mar. 8, 1927 116283221 Marcalus May 10, 1927 13883325: Smith Oct. 18', 1932 1,979,334 Lyth Nov. 6; 1934 2,020,118' Kellett et' al'. Nov. 5, 1935 2,1761% Berry" Oct. 17, 1939 231943078 Simonds Mar. 19, 1940 2.3313585 Berry et al. Dec; 28, 1943 2.357.976 Roesen" Sept. 12, 1944 2 ,366,999 Campbell: Jan. 9, 1945 2;385,'69.2i Gorbinet ali Sept. 25, 1945 23475380- Clemi etal'. July 5, 1949 235093760 Grafton May 30, 1950 235203326 Beck" Aug. 29, 1950 251M588 Husson; Jan. 9, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country. Date 95330. Great Britain 1- Apr. 2, 1908 on 1907 630,735 Germany. June 4, 1936 6971347- Germany- Oct. 11, 1940

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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/527.2, 242/542.3, 242/532
International ClassificationB65H19/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2301/4172, B65H2301/41361, B65H19/2253
European ClassificationB65H19/22B4