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Publication numberUS2677372 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1954
Filing dateJun 13, 1952
Priority dateJun 13, 1952
Publication numberUS 2677372 A, US 2677372A, US-A-2677372, US2677372 A, US2677372A
InventorsBarnish Jr Andrew William
Original AssigneeBarnish Jr Andrew William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle holder
US 2677372 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 4, 1954 A. w. BARNISH, JR

BOTTLE HOLDER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 13, 1952 Juventor Andrew W. Bornish Jr.

I (Ittorneg) May 4, 1954 A. w. BARNISH, JR

BOTTLE HOLDER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 13, 1952 mentor 3n Andrew W. Burnish Jr %f@-j I (Ittorneg Patented May 4, 1954 1 TED STATES T OF F ICE 12 Claims. 1

This invention relates to supports for mouthed receptacles, such as bottles, and a temporary support for an instrument associated with the receptacle and its contents. An example of such a support is one constructed and arranged to support a closure-sealed bottle by the mouth portion or neck thereof, and to provide a handle for the support and a temporary support and guide for a hypodermic syringe sothat the syringe barrel may be moved .along the handle and the needle of the syringe will be in a position to puncture substantially the axial center of the closure of the bottle.

An important object of this invention is to provide a support as described in which an opening is provided for the mouth or neck portion of the bottle and is so associated with a'guide'groove in the handle portion that when the operator grasps the handle portion with one hand, and a syringe is placed in the groove by the other hand, the syringe may be slid along the groove until the needle punctures the closure (usually of resilient rubber) of the bottle so that a volume of the contents may be drawn into the syringe and the needle withdrawn from the closure whereupon the puncture will close. The groove insures that the needle point will not strike the edge of the mouth of nor the support for the bottle and, consequently, the point will not be bent, break ofi nor be blunted.

Another important object is to provide means whereby the bottle is held immovable during the time it is supported by the support, yet it'may be manually readily removed.

Still another important object-of this invention is to provide a structure as described which includes a support hung on a horizontal pivot which support will pivot downwardly, due to its weight, with the bottle mouth downwardly whereby the contents of the bottle will gravitate toward the mouth, and the holder and bottle may be tilted to a convenient angle for syringe-extraction of the contents of the bottle.

Furthermore, an important object of the invention is to provide a means for detachably securing receptacles, having mouths'of various diameters, to the supports.

Additionally, an important object of the invention is to provide asupport which contains no complicated parts, is built sturdily andis relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages of the "invention will be apparent during the course of theiollowing detailed description .of the :invention, taken 2 in connection with the accompany drawings, and. in which drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of one form of the new support in use.

Fig. 2 is a top plan of the support of Fig. 1 with a receptacle securing means in an inoperative position.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse section of the means of Fig. 2 in an'operativeposition.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentarysection of a receptacle secured to the support, which latter is shown in section.

Fig. 5 is a transverse section of the'combined handle and guide portion of the new support.

Fig. 6 is a view, somewhat like Fig. 1, of another form of the invention in use.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged transversesection of the receptacle securing means of Fig. 6 in use.

Fig. 8 is a top plan of the support 'ofiFigs; .6 and '3'.

In the drawings, wherein for the purpose of illustration, are shown two forms of the invention, the letter A designates one former the new support; the letter B, another form thereof; C and D mouthed receptacles supported by the supports A and B; hypodermic syringe; F and G, hands of an operator of the new supports A and B and the syringe F; and H a walltosupport the supports A or 'B.

The support A of Figs. 1 to 5inc1usiveincludes a receptacle-holding portion l9, preferably comprising a body of suitable hardenedplastic material which may be substantially transparent,

' having substantially flat upperand lower faces I I and 52 preferably narrow side edges l3 and I4 and rounded front edge 15. Adjacent the front edge the body is provided with an'opening 16, preferably circular, extending from the face 'I'l to the face l2. At the end of the opening 1-6 nearest the face l2, there is a narrow arcuate shoulder I? extending a short distance into theopening and around its edge for substantiallyISOfl This opening is constructed and arranged to receive the mouth portion of a receptacle 0, witha part of the inner bead 78 at the mouth $6 disposed against this shoulder.

In addition, the support A includes a .combined or dual-function handle and guide portion 20, comprising an elongated bodyof, preferably, the same hardened plastic as that of the support portion 1 i3 and rigid with the support-portion. It is of a length long enough to be readily grasped by the hand of the operator and to support a hypodermic syringe E substantially as shown'in Fig. 1. A suitable :length, for example, for the handle 3 portion 20 is 3 /2 inches. The body of the portion 20 has opposite faces 2! and 22, and a free end face 23 which latter forms an abutment or shoulder for the bead '16 at the end of the barrel T of a conventional hypodermic syringe E and which bead is conventionally held by two of the fingers of the hand. From the free end face 23 to closely adjacent the juncture of the portions it and (the two portions forming right angles) the face 2i is provided with a centrallydisposed longitudinal upwardly opening groove 25 which has downwardly converging side faces to provide a V-shaped groove in a transverse section of the portion 20 as in Fig. 5. Since many hypodermic syringes have a metallic segment 18 encircling a portion of the barrel i5 of the syringe adjacent the end bead or shoulder '16 of the barrel, there is preferably provided a shallow cutout 25 for this segment at the free end of the portion 29. At the inner or juncture end of the portion 20 there is a deeper cut-out 26 for the bead it at the mouth of a conventional receptacle C, such as a bottle and so the groove 2*! does not extend quite to the portion :ill. The depth of the groove 24, taken with the width thereof, is such that when a syringe E is disposed longitudinally of the groove with its barrel having line contact at the two parallel edges of the groove, the needle point 8! of the syringe will substantially align with the axis or center of the opening it in the portion In. For example, the depth of the groove may be a? inch, the longitudinal edges of the groove spaced substantially 1 inch apart and the distance from the bottom of the groove to the axis of the opening I5 may be 2: 2 inch.

Means 35 to detachably secure the neck portion of a receptacle to the support A preferably comprises a clamp structure associated with the opening 15 and the shoulder ll. This means includes a bifurcated keeper 3! pivoted at its bifurcated end as by the pivots 32 of Fig. 1, to the body portion l0. One leg of the keeper 3| contains an arcuate cut-out 34 the edge of which extends inwardly of a part of the edge of the one-half. Thus, viewed along the groove 24 one 1.,

first sees the circle formed by the shoulder l1 and. cut-out 35 and, viewed from the face H of the portion l0 one first sees a portion of the circle 7 formed by the opening I B and the edge of the cutout 35 inwardly of a part of the edge of the circle.

The axes of both circles substantially align with the point 8! of the hypodermic needle 80. The body of the keeper beyond the legs carries, as best shown in Fig. 3, a spring-urged bolt 36 slidable through an opening 3'! the keeper to and urged to a bolting position by an expansion spiral spring 38 in a part of the opening 37 and bearing at one end against the bolt. The free end of the bolt is adapted to extend into a suitable socket 39 in the portion ill at the edge 85 when the keeper 30 is in an operative position. When swung into the inoperative position of Fig. 2, the neck portion of a bottle may be inserted into the opening [6 with a part of the under portion of its bead H3 abutting the shoulder I! and the keeper 3!! then swing into an operative position whereupon the portion of the keeper 3!! around the cut-out 34 is in position to abut the rest of the under portion of the bead and the edge of the cut-out encircles a portion of the neck portion 65' just back of the bead. This retains the bottle substantially rigid with the receptacle-holding portion l0, but removable when the keeper is swung to the inoperative position of Fig. 2. Of course the bottle cannot slip forwardly, partly due to the portion of the bead 10 within the cutout 25 and partly due to the neck portion retained as described.

A support portion 40 for the receptacle holding portion l0 may be a vertically-disposed plate or body 4| having a pair of parallel arms d2 extending outwardly therefrom and provided with pivot means which may be two suitable pivots extending through openings in the arms 42 and into sockets in the portion remote from the end carrying the portion ll.

Means 46, such as a screw, is provided to secure the support portion 40 to a suitable wall H, such as that of a surgical or medical cart, examination table, desk, or the like. This permits tilting of the receptacle-holding portion l5 into various angular positions with respect to the support portion 4d most convenient for the operator.

The form B of the support as shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8 is generally like the form A, and includes a receptacle-support portion which may be of hardened plastic having an upper face 5!, lower face 52 and parallel side edges 53 and 5s. The portion 59 has a depression in its face 5i, best shown in Fig. 8 to accommodate a portion of the length of a bottle or vial D.

The portion 50 also includes an offset 55 nor mal to the portion 50 and containing an opening 5'5, preferably circular to accommodate the head at the neck or mouth portion of a receptacle, as a bottle.

Associated with the portion 5B'is a combined or dual-function handle and guide portion 65 comprising an elongated body of, preferably, the same hardened plastic as that of the portion 5 and is shown as rigid with (being integral with) the latter. It is of a length long enough to be readily grasped by the hand of the operator and to support a hypodermic syringe E substantially as shown in Fig. 6. A suitable length is 3 inches, altho this may vary. The body of the portion 60 has opposite faces GI and G2 which are continuations of the faces 5| and 52 and side edges 63 and 54 which merge into the edges 53 and 54. There is a longitudinal groove 65 in the body extending into the face El and a forward or free end face 66 into which one end of the groove opens. The other end of the groove 65 extends toward the portion 50 and merges into the depression 55. The groove 65 has downwardly-converging side walls for the same purpose as the side walls of the groove 24 and the function of the groove 65 is the same as that of the groove 24. The groove 65 is adapted to contain a portion of the barrel 15 of a hypodermic syringe E so that the needle 88 thereof will align with the axis of the opening 51 and, consequently, the axis of the mouth of a receptacle D carried by the portion 50.

Means 50' to detachably secure the mouth portion of a receptacle D to the support B preferably comprises a set screw with its screw-threaded shank 61' extending through a suitable screwthreaded opening in the offset 56 extending to the opening 51, and with the free end of the shank adapted to bear against the neck portion 65 of the receptacle to clamp the receptacle in place when it is disposed within the receptacle depression 55.

Since the same support portion 40, pivot means d5 andsecuring means 25 as for the support A may be employed forthe-support 3, similar reference characters are employed for these parts'of both forms.

The receptacle C is shown as a bottle having neck portion 65 ending in a mouth 66 closed by a resilient rubber closure'fi'i of a conventional type having a relatively thin rubber disc 68 over the central portion of the mouth as and a side wall or skirt 59 extending into contact with the innersurfacc of the neck portion (55'. The neck portion has a bead it and the closure 6? may be held in place by a thin metallic flanged ring ii of well known shape. In fact, the receptacles C and D and their closures are of well known conventional shape.

Except that it is smaller, the receptacle D is of construction as the receptacle C.

The hypodermic syringe E is of conventional construction including a cylindrical barrel I5 ending in a bead 78 at one end, and with the barrel housing a piston or plunger with an outwardly-extending handle Ti at the beaded end. Next to the h ad is a metallic segment 73 en circling a portion of the barrel l5 and having .roiections is extending upwardly and over the can in order to bear against the handle ill to irrationally restrain it against accidental move- The needle 84! is carried by the barrel has a point 8|.

From Figures 1 and 6 it thought that the operation of the supports A B is clear, but it hould be pointed out that when the operator desires to charge the hypodermic syringe E from a receptacle C or D carried by the supports A or the combined handle and guide portion 20 or es, as the case may be, is grasped by one hand, as hand F with the thumb 9t and index finger upon the side faces of the portion or til, and

this portion and the portion is or as the case i may be, is raised (pivoted) upwardly to a convenient angle to the vertical. The other hand G then disposed the empty syringe E within the oove M or 85, as the case may be, with the handle I? retracted, until the bead l'ii abuts the end face 23 or 66, as the case may be, and at which time the needle has penetrated the disc whereupon the thumb Sit and index finger 9| are tightened upon the barrel 75 (while still grasping the portion 29 or til, as the case may be) and the handle 'i'i then drawn outwardly by the thumb $2 and index finger 33 of the hand G of the operator. This results in the vacuum within the syringe to cause flow of a volume of the contents of the receptacle into the syringe. When charged, the syringe is drawn along the groove to free the needle from the disc 58 and the syringe may then be removed and the hand F drop the support, which will pivot downwardly. During this time, the receptacle C or D, as the case may be, has remained rigid with respect to the portion 20 or 60.

It is very easy for the operator to tilt the support A or B so that the contents of the receptacle C or D can be withdrawn even when the volume is low.

It should be noted that both grooves 26 and 85 are shallow so that only the lesser portion of the barrel 75 of the syringe E is accommodated therein, with the greater portion of the barrel outwardly of the groove, whereby the thumb 9i) and index finger 9! may grasp it readily and firmly.

Receptacles of various sizes may be accommo- 6. dated by the supports and :are quickly attached and detached.

Various changes maybeimade to the forms-of the invention iherein shown and "described without departing from the spirit of the invention or scope of the claims.

I claim:

1. In combination with aconventional syringe having a cylindrical barrel and a needle, and a receptacle having a mouth portionraisupport for the mouthed receptacle, said support iincluding a receptacle-holding portion having an opening for the mouth portion of the receptacle, and an elongated combined handle and .guide portion rigid with the holding portion and provided with an elongated groove extending towards a portion of the edge of said opening, the depth of said groove beingsuch that the barrelof the syringe may be moved along said groove'and the needle thereof will align with and'penetrate substanti lly the center of said opening.

2. In combination with a conventional syringe having a cylindrical barrel and a needle, and a receptacle having a mouthportion, a support for the mouthed receptacle, sai'dsupport including a receptacle-holding portionihavingan opening for the mouth portion of the receptacle, an elongated combined handleand guide portion rigid with. the holding portion-andprovided with an elongated groove extending towards a'portion of the edge of said openingthe :depth of said groove being such that'the'barrel of Lthe'syringe may be moved along said groove and the needle thereof will align with and penetrate substantially the center of said opening, an'dmeans carried by said receptacle-holding portion to detachably secure said mouth porti'onin said opening.

3. In combination with :a conventional-syringe having a cylindrical barrel and aneedle, and a receptacle having a mouth portion, a support for the mouthed receptacle, said support Jincluding a receptacle-holdingportionhaving an opening for the mouth portion of the receptacle, an elongated combined handle and guide portion rigid with the holding portion and provided with an elongated groove extending towards a portion of the edge of said opening, the depth of said groove being such that the barrel of the syringe may be moved along said groove and the needle thereof will align with and penetrate substantially the center of said opening, a support portion for said receptacle-holding portion and pivot means freely pivoting said receptacle-holding portion to said support portion for normally positioning said receptacle-holding portion and receptacle in a substantially vertical position with said mouth portion downwardly.

4. In combination with a conventional syringe having a cylindrical barrel, a needle at one end of the barrel and a bead at the other end of the barrel, and a mouthed receptacle, a support for the mouthed receptacle, said support including a receptacle-holding portion having an opening for the mouth portion of the receptacle, and an elongated combined handle and guide portion rigid with the holding portion and provided with an abutment at one end thereof and an elongated groove extending towards a portion of the edge of said opening and extending to said abutment, the depth of said groove being such that the barrel of the syringe may be moved along said groove and the needle thereof will align with and penetrate substantially the center of said opening, said abutment being constructed and arranged to provide an abutment for a portion of said bead of said syringe.

5. The combination according to claim 1 characterized in that said groove accommodates a lesser portion of the barrel of said syringe with the greater portion of said barrel outwardly of the groove, whereby the barrel may be held by the fingers of an operator against tipping.

6. The combination according to claim 1 characterized in that said receptacle-holding portion has a part surrounding said opening, and said combined handle and guide portion is disposed with its longitudinal axis normal to the longitudinal axis of said part.

7. The combination according to claim 1 characterized in that said receptacle-holding portion is elongated and has a shoulder extending with said opening for abutment of a part of the free end of said mouth portion and said combined handle and guide portion is disposed with its longitudinal axis normal to the longitudinal axis of said receptacle-holding portion and shoulder.

8. A support according to claim 1 characterized in that said receptacle-holding portion is elongated and the longitudinal axes of said reoeptacle-holding portion and combined handle and guide portion are coincident, and said groove accommodates a lesser portion of the barrel of said syringe with the greater portion of said barrel outwardly of said groove.

9. A support according to claim 1 charac erized in that said receptacle-holding portion is elongated and the longitudinal axes of said receptacle-holding portion and combined handle and guide portion are coincident, said combined handle and guide portion has an end face constructed and arranged to provide an abutment for a portion of the conventional barrel bead of said syringe, and said groove opens to said face.

10. A support according to claim 3 characterized in that said receptacle-holding portion is elongated and the longitudinal axes of said receptacle-holding portion and combined handle and guide portion are coincident, said pivot means includes a pivot having a longitudinal axis, and said combined handle and guide portion is disposed with its longitudinal axis normal to the longitudinal axis of said pivot.

11. The combination according to claim 1 characterized in that said receptacle has a neck and a head at its mouth, said receptacle-holding portion has a fixed part and a pivoted keeper, said fixed part has a shoulder extending into said opening for abutment of a portion of the free end of the mouth portion of said receptacle, and said. keeper has a cut-out constructed and arranged to extend around a portion of the neck of said receptacle back of said bead.

12. The combination according to claim 1 characterized in that said receptacle has a neck and a bead at its mouth, said receptacle-holding portion has a fixed part and a pivoted keeper, said fixed part has a shoulder extending into said opening for abutment of a portion of the free end of the mouth portion of said receptacle, and said keeper has a cut-out constructed and arranged to extend around a portion of the neck or" said receptacle back of said bead, and a cut out outwardly of the first named cut-out abutting the other portion of the free end of the mouth portion of said receptacle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 392,861 Geyer Nov. 13, 1888 655,951 Bates Aug. 14, 1900 809,437 Finney Jan. 9, 1908 1,040,659 Escherich Oct. 8, 1912 1,410,608 Schroth Mar. 28, 1922 2,455,848 Young Dec. '7, 1948

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Referenced by
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US2861570 *Apr 30, 1956Nov 25, 1958Beecher Eugene LSyringe filling device
US3098481 *Jan 17, 1961Jul 23, 1963Astra Apotekarnes Kem FabSterile fluid dispenser
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US3982716 *Sep 24, 1975Sep 28, 1976Alonzo TreesMedical bottle holder
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/414, D24/128, 248/311.3
International ClassificationA61J1/00, A61M5/178, A61J1/14, A61J1/20
Cooperative ClassificationA61J1/16, A61M5/1782, A61J1/2096, A61J2001/2055
European ClassificationA61J1/20F, A61M5/178F, A61J1/16