Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2677901 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1954
Filing dateApr 26, 1950
Priority dateApr 26, 1950
Publication numberUS 2677901 A, US 2677901A, US-A-2677901, US2677901 A, US2677901A
InventorsTilleman Norris P
Original AssigneeTilleman Norris P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indicating chaplet
US 2677901 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 11, 1954 N. P. TILLEMAN INDICATING CHAPLET 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 26, 1950 mmt INVENTOR.

NOfP/P/S P T/LLE/VH/V BY QTTO/P/VE) Patented May 11, 1954 UNITED STATES PATiEN'i ()FFICE 2 Claims.

less chain. Upon the crucifix beads, prayers introductory to said.

The rosary when practiced, consists of two distinct modes of prayers, used together in one exercise, or in other words, it is a combination of mental prayer or meditation with vocal prayer.

and these five the rosary are To make a chaplet especially adapted for in struction, each pater noster or large bead is provided with an indicia or inscription denoting each mystery in its proper decade of prayers.

It is an object of my invention to .provide an indicating chaplet with may proceed in an orderly way around the rosary chain.

It is a further object of my invention to provide an indicating chaplet with indicating beads bearing indicia, or printing, colored according to rubric or prescribed form.

It is a still further object of my invention to provide an indicating chaplet with indicating beads, each bead bearing indicia or printing of a plurality of colors, each color being reserved for a particular series of meditations, thereby to more readily identify a particular series as the user proceeds around the rosary chain.

It is yet a further provide indicating beads, bearing indicia, the backgrounds of which are colored according to rubric, thereby to more readily identify a part1cular series of meditations as the user proceeds around the rosary chain.

It is still another object of my invention to provide an indicating chaplet with indicating beads, each bead comprising a transparent cylinder through which is visible indicia therein.

It is yet another object of my invention to provide chaplet indicating beads having luminescent indicia thereon for visibility in the darkness and in dimly lighted churches.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the figures thereof and wherein:

Fig. 1 shows a chaplet embodying my indicating beads;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged exploded view showing the details of one construction or" my indicating beads;

Fig. 3 shows a double-eye rod-link that is disposed through the indicating beads for linking the assembled beads with the adjacent decade beads;

Fig. i is an enlarged development of the cylindrical indicia sheet of Fig. 2, specific to the date bead l8, Fig. 1, and which can be rolled for insertion into the transparent plastic cylinder which forms the casing of the indicating bead;

Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 are enlarged developments of the cylindrical indicia sheets showing mystery indicia thereon, specific to certain beads, and showing the indicia colored according to Catholic Church rubric;

Fig. 10 is a development of a sheet showing modified rolled indicia background being colored in lieu of coloring the indicia itself and the indicia being coated with a luminescent material;

Fig. 11 is an exploded view modification of the bead shown in Fig. 2, showing principally another end cap arrangement;

Fig. 12 shows another modification of the bead casing principally in that the indicia are formed on the inner periphery of the bead casing;

Fig. 13 shows a further modification of the bead casing principally in that the indicia are formed on the outer periphery of the bead casing; and

Fig. 14 shows yet another modification of the bead casing principally in that the casing is hexagonal in form;

Fig. 15 shows still another modification illustrating solid cylindrical bead.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in Fig. 1, which illustrates a preferred embodiment, a chaplet comprised of a string of linked beads with a crucifix attached. On this string is included five decades of small beads. Each decade is preceded by a pater noster or large bead, followed by ten ave marias or smaller beads. At an appropriate point there. is connected to the chain a short length which terminates in a crucifix. This short length contains two large beads and three smaller beads therebetween for introductory prayers.

All the large or indicating beads comprise a transparent plastic tubular casing l i, Fig. 2, having snugly inserted therein a tubular sheet l2 bearing indicia or printing thereon (to be described hereafter) visible through said transparent tube H; and within said tubular sheet element i2 is snugly inserted a tubular element 13. Said tubular elements H, 52 and it are all of the same length and bound together by end cap closures it, centrally a'pertured, and have tubular portions l receivable by and frictionally engageable with the inner periphery of said tubular elements 53, and outstanding flanges l5 that are abuttingly engageable with the ends of said tubular elements, when assembled. The sheet l2 can be of paper, foil, metal, or any other suitable material.

A double-eye rod-link ll, Fig. 3, is disposed through said tubular element l3 and the end caps Hi to enable the assembled large indicating beads to be linked with the adjacent decade beads. The assembled bead is rotatable about the link as an axis, as the assembled bead is rolled between the finger tips. The cylindrical casing lends itself to be conveniently rolled between the finger tips.

Beads of this construction are embodied in the chaplet of Fig. l, and appear therein as beads l8, 2i, 23, 25,21 and 29.

According to custom, some of the mysteries hereinbefore referred to are used for reflection on certain days of the week and within penitential seasons, and others upon other days and other seasons. In accordance therewith, within the large bead it, next adjacent the crucifix It, a rolled sheet if Fig. i, indicates that the joyful mysteries, indicated by the capital letter J, are to be reflected upon on Mondays, Thursdays, and the Sundays in Advent; the sorrowful mysteries indicated by the capital letter S, are to be reflected on Tuesdays, Fridays, and the Sundays in Lent; and the glorious mysteries indicated by the capital letter G, are to be reflected upon on Wednesdays, Saturdays, and all other Sundays. This cylindrical bead i8 is called the date indieating bead. The remaining large indicating beads are known as the mystery indicating beads.

Within the mystery indicating bead 2 i, a rolled sheet 22, Fig. 5, indicates, in abbreviation, the first joyful mystery (the annunciation), the first sorrowful mystery (the agony in the garden), and the first glorious mystery (the resurrection of our Lord) Within the mystery indicating bead 23, a rolled sheet 24, Fig. 6, indicates, in abbreviation, the second joyful mystery (the visitation), the sec- 0nd sorrowful mystery (the scourging), and the second glorious mystery (the ascension).

Within the mystery indicating head 25, a rolled sheet 25, Fig. 7, indicates, in abbreviation, the third joyful mystery (the nativity or birth of Christ), the third sorrowful mystery (the crowning with thorns), and the third glorious mystery (the descent of the Holy Ghost).

Within the mystery indicating bead 2'1, 9, rolled sheet 28, Fig. 8, indicates, in abbreviation, the fourth joyful mystery (the presentation in the temple), the fourth sorrowful mystery (the carrying of the cross), and the fourth glorious mystery (the assumption of Mary into heaven).

Within the mystery indicating bead 25 a rolled sheet 31, Fig. 9, indicates, in abbreviation, the fifth joyful mystery (the finding in the temple with the doctors), the fifth sorrowful mystery (the crucifixion) and the fifth glorious mystery (the coronation of Mary queen of heaven).

It is to be noted that the joyful, sorrowful and glorious mysteries are all serially numbered by the numerals l, 2, 3, 4t and 5 around the rosary to indicate the order of contemplation and the direction of procedure.

It is to be further noted that the joyful, sorrowful and glorious mystery indicia are colored according to Catholic Church rubric or prescribed form. That is, the joyful mystery indicia are to be colored green or red, green bein preferred and indicated on the figures of the drawing; the sorrowful mystery indicia are colored purple; and the glorious mystery indi ia are to be colored white or golden yellow, white being preferred and indicated.

Also the date bead l8, Fig. 4, has its rolled sheet 26 indicia correspondingly colored, that the dates on which the joyful mysteries are to be reflected upon are to be colored green or red, green being preferred and indicated; the sorrowful mystery date indications are colored purple; and the glorious mystery indications are to be colored white or golden yellow, white being preferred and indicated.

It is obvious that in lieu of the indicia being colored, the back grounds for all the indicia can be appropriately colored as shown in Fig. 10. In this disclosure, sheet 32, which could be any of the bead sheets, is provided with luminescent indicia 33, the backgrounds therefor are colored in accordance with Catholic Church rubric. That is, the background for the joyful mystery being green or red, green being preferred and indicated as at 34; the background for the sorrowful mystery being purple as indicated at is; and the background for the glorious mystery being white or golden yellow, white being pre- 'f erred and indicated as at 35.

The bead modification of Fig. 11 differs from the bead structure of Fig. 2 only in the end cap arrangement. In this modified structure the end cap closures 3! have their tubular portions 38 receivable by and frictionally engageable with the inner periphery 39 of the casing element 4i.

Said cap closures are additionally frictionally engageable with the outer periphery of the cylindrical core element.

The bead casing modification of Fig. 12 shows a transparent cylindrical casing 42 having indicia 43 formed on the inner periphery 44 of the casing.

The bead casing modification of Fig. 13 shows a cylindrical casing 45 having indicia 46 formed on the outer periphery 57 of the casing. The end caps 51 thereof engage with the outer periphery of the casing 55.

It is obvious that the cap closure 5| of Fig. 13 can be substituted for the cap closures i l of Fig. 2 to provide a composite subsidiary modification. In this modification the cap closures 5! are receivable by and frictionaliy engageable with the outer periphery of casing l i The head casing modification of Fig. 14 shows a transparent hexagonal casing 48 having indicia 49 formed on the outer faces of said casing. The end caps 52 thereof engage with the inner periphery of the casing 48.

The bead modification of Fig. 15 shows a roduiar bead 53 having a fine bore therethrough to receive a link 54 and be rotatable thereon. The indicia 55 is formed in the outer periphery of said bead 53.

The characteristic features of this invention are chaplet indicating beads that are cylindrical be more easily rollable between the finger tips to facilitate the inspection of indicia thereon; that are serially numbered so that the user may proceed in an orderly way around the rosary chain; that have indicia colored according to Catholic Church rubric and whereby to more readily identify each series of indicia as the user proceeds around the rosary chain; that is transparent and through which indicia therein is visible thereby protecting the indicia from external wear and damage; and that has luminescent indicia for visibility in the darkness.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood, that Within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed and desired to be protected by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A chaplet including Pater Noster beads and a crucifix, said Pater N oster beads comprising a transparent tubular casing, a sheet in each casing fitting against the inner periphery of said casing, and a tubular element fitting against the inner periphery of said sheet; apertured end caps for said beads, having tubular projections engaging with the outer periphery of said element; and connecting means disposed through said apertures and through said tubular element, and adapted for connection into said chaplet; and said sheets having indicia on the outer periphery thereof.

2. A chaplet including Pater Noster beads and a crucifix, said Pater Noster beads comprising a transparent tubular casing, a sheet in each casing fitting against the inner periphery of said casing, and a tubular element fitting against the inner periphery of said sheet; apertured end caps for said beads, having tubular projections engaging with the inner periphery of said casing; and connecting means disposed through said apertures and through said tubular element, and adapted for connection into said chaplet; and said sheets having indicia on the outer periphery thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Luminous Materials-Properties and Typical Applications, articles by L. Y. Dawson in Product Engineering, July 1947, pages 144-149.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US475400 *May 2, 1891May 24, 1892 Vania
US1187353 *Dec 27, 1915Jun 13, 1916Dennis H McbrideIndicating-rosary.
US1454013 *May 24, 1922May 1, 1923Boulton Charles WChaplet
US1508523 *Jul 3, 1923Sep 16, 1924Naterman Henry CDisplay holder
US2156553 *Aug 4, 1936May 2, 1939Arthur S BaronDisplay device
US2420265 *Jan 10, 1945May 6, 1947Max SchickTalisman container
US2506800 *Jun 2, 1949May 9, 1950Maclennan John CLuminous pendant
AT67045B * Title not available
IT272132B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2853802 *Aug 29, 1955Sep 30, 1958Catholic Mfg Company IncRosaries
US2876559 *Jul 31, 1957Mar 10, 1959Sloan Walter ERosary
US2912770 *Nov 6, 1957Nov 17, 1959St Peter Rosary CompanyRosary entity
US2972819 *Jun 29, 1959Feb 28, 1961Most Reverend Henry J GrimmelsDevotional prayer counting device
US4358013 *Jul 28, 1980Nov 9, 1982Shebley David PMeditation supporting device
US4408406 *Sep 21, 1981Oct 11, 1983Barton C DLuggage identification tag
US4534126 *Mar 19, 1984Aug 13, 1985Harry GilmanCheck-out counter divider
US4798016 *Apr 3, 1986Jan 17, 1989Venditti Arthur PPicture pen
US4879882 *Aug 15, 1988Nov 14, 1989Rpj Development CorporationJewelry with interchangeable elements
US5890308 *Jan 31, 1997Apr 6, 1999Harrington; Kirk DouglasBaseball bat styled graphic material display device
US6009653 *Jun 16, 1999Jan 4, 2000Harrington; Kirk D.Baseball bat styled graphic material display device
US6076194 *Oct 18, 1999Jun 20, 2000Purkett; Varan C.Wearing apparel system with suspended indicia
US7322214Sep 14, 2006Jan 29, 2008Ignatowski Patricia MConvertible eyeglass retainer/jewelry article
US7513774 *Jun 12, 2006Apr 7, 2009Jon KrilichPrayer strand marker device
US7901418 *Oct 4, 2003Mar 8, 2011Vitalitec International, Inc.Clamp having bendable shaft
US8262393Aug 25, 2010Sep 11, 2012Adams William ERosary
US8303611Sep 28, 2010Nov 6, 2012Vitalitec International, Inc.Shaft for use with clamp device
US8636757May 10, 2012Jan 28, 2014David J. DanitzBendable shaft assembly for a clamp
US20090106942 *Oct 26, 2008Apr 30, 2009Dell Orfano Donna JHandle and system for organization
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/246, 63/4, 250/462.1, 40/660, 235/123
International ClassificationA44C25/00, A44C23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C23/00, A44C25/002
European ClassificationA44C25/00B2, A44C23/00