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Publication numberUS2677904 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1954
Filing dateJan 9, 1953
Priority dateJan 9, 1953
Publication numberUS 2677904 A, US 2677904A, US-A-2677904, US2677904 A, US2677904A
InventorsWillie Reed
Original AssigneeWillie Reed
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cushion shoe with pneumatic sole
US 2677904 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1954' w. REED 2,677,904

CUSHION SHOE WITH PNEUMATIC SOLE Filed Jan. 9, 1955 IN V EN TOR. fl /4 4 as @150 Patented May II, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CUSHION SHOE WITH PNEUMATIC SOLE Willie Reed, Memphis, Tenn.

Application January 9, 1953, Serial No. 330,538

2 Claims.

This invention relates to footwear, and more particularly to an improved pneumatic cushioned structure for a shoe.

The main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved cushioned shoe which is simple in construction, which involves inexpensive components, and which provides a resilient cushioning effect for a shoe without substantially increasing its bulk.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved pneumatically cushioned shoe which is sturdy in construction, which is comfortable to wear, and which retains all of the desired properties of shoes of standard construction while at the same time providing a high degree of cushioning action for the feet.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure l is a bottom plan view, partially in cross section, of an improved shoe sole construction according to the present invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged vertical cross sectional view taken on the line 2--2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a. horizontal cross sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary end elevational view of the heel portion and a portion of the back of the shoe adjacent to said heel portion, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary plan View of the forward portion of the inflatable cushion element employed in the improved shoe of Figures 1 to 4.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the channelshaped valve retaining member employed in the shoe of Figures 1 to 4.

Referring to the drawings, the improved shoe is designated generally at H and includes an outer sole i2, an inner sole i3, and a flexible peripheral wall l4 connecting the margins of the outer sole l2 and inner sole 13. There is thus defined between the outer sole l2 and the inner sole I3 a compartment in which is disposed an inflatable bag or cushion l5 shaped to conform with the contour of the shoe, the cushion or bag i5 being formed of rubber or other suitable inflatable material. As shown in Figure 2, the inner and outer soles l2 and I3 may be of laminated construction and may be provided with the transverse reinforcing members It and I! spaced longitudinally along the outer and inner soles, as shown in Figures 1 and the reinforcing members It and H being of any suitable material, such as strip steel.

The flexible peripheral wall M is formed with an aperture [8 at the toe end of the shoe and is slit transversely at the heel end thereof, as shown at :9, thereby providing means for inserting or removing the inflatable bladder IS. The bag 15 is integrally formed at its forward end with an apertured tab 20 which may be engaged by a suitable hook or other implement inserted through the aperture 18 to pull the inflatable bag l5 into the compartment defined between the inner sole is and the outer sole E2, the bag being inserted through the transverse slit 19 at the rear end of the shoe. The implement, which may be a hooked rod of wire or other suitable material is inserted through the aperture !8, is engaged with the apertured tab 20, and then the implement is pulled, pulling the inflatable bag or bladder l5 into the space between the inner sole l3 and the outer sole l2, after which the hooked implement may be disengaged from the tab 29. The rear portion of the flexible peripheral wall M is provided with suitable laces 2i traversing the slit I9 and detachably securing the edges of the slit together, as shown in Figure 4.

The inner sole I3 is formed with a longitudinally extending slot 22 in which is secured a channel-shaped rigid member of metal or the like, shown at 23, said channel-shaped member having the side walls 24, 24 disposed adjacent the side walls of the slot 22, and having the apertured top flanges 25, 25 which are received in suitable recesses formed in the top surface of the inner sole I 3, said channel-shaped member being secured by means of suitable fasteners engaged through the apertures 26 of the flanges 25 and embedded in the inner sole l3. Designated at 21 is a valve member which is connected to the inflatable bag if; and which is disposed in the channel-shaped member 23. As shown in Figure 6, the side flanges of the channel member 23 are formed with transversely aligned, longitudinally extending slots 28, 28 which have the downwardly curved end portions 29 opening at the bottom of the channel-shaped member. The valve 21 is formed with the outwardly projecting pin elementsst, 30 slidably engaging in the slots 28, 28.

When the inflatable bag I5 is inserted, in the manner above described, the valve 27 slips into the slot 22 and enters the channel-shaped member 23, the pins 30, 3B of the valve engaging in the curved portions 29, 29 of the respective slots 28, and eventually being moved into the straight, longitudinally extending portions of said slots, as the inflatable bag [5 is pulled to its final position. The valve 21 may be rotated clockwise, as viewed in Figure 2, through a sufficient angle to permit the inflating implement to be engaged on the valve, and to permit the bag l5 to be filled with air. After the bag I5 has been inflated, the valve 21 may be released and returns to the horizontal position thereof shown in Figure 2. A suitable lining member 32 of leather or other flexible material is disposed over the inner sole l3 and covers the valve 21, as illustrated in Figure 2.

While a specific embodiment of an improved cushioned shoe has been disclosed in the foregoing description, it will be understood that various modifications within the spirit of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is intended that no limitations be placed on the invention except as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a shoe, an outer sole, an inner sole, a flexible peripheral wall connecting the margins of said soles, whereby an inflatable compartment is defined between said soles, said wall being formed with an aperture at the toe end of the shoe and being slit transversely at the heel end thereof, lace means detachably securing the edges of the slit, an inflatable pneumatic cushion in said compartment, said inner sole being formed with a slot, an apertured tab at the forward end of said cushion, an elongated valve on said cushion received in said slot, and a lining member disposed on said inner sole overlying said valve.

2. In a shoe, an outer sole, an inner sole, a flexible peripheral wall connecting the margins of said soles, whereby an inflatable compartment is defined between said soles, said wall being formed with an aperture at the toe end of the shoe and being slit transversely at the heel end thereof, lace means detachably securing the edges of the slit, an inflatable pneumatic cushion positioned in said compartment, an apertured tab at the forward end of said cushion, said inner sole being formed with a slot, a channel-shaped rigid member secured longitudinally in said slot, the side walls of said rigid member being formed with transversely aligned, longitudinally extending, downwardly and rearwardly curved slots, an elongated valve on said cushion received in said channel-shaped member, respective projections on said valve slidably received in said last-named slots, and a lining member disposed on said inner sole overlying said valve.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1011460 *Nov 24, 1909Dec 12, 1911James McnairPneumatic tread for boots and shoes.
US1506975 *Aug 21, 1922Sep 2, 1924Charles CooneyBoot and shoe having inflated air cushion inserted in the sole and heel thereof
US1942883 *Aug 15, 1931Jan 9, 1934Adolf SchafferPneumatic shoe
FR379493A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3120712 *Aug 30, 1961Feb 11, 1964Lambert Menken LesterShoe construction
US4237625 *Sep 18, 1978Dec 9, 1980Cole George SThrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4358902 *Apr 2, 1980Nov 16, 1982Cole George SThrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4577417 *Apr 27, 1984Mar 25, 1986Energaire CorporationSole-and-heel structure having premolded bulges
US5113599 *Sep 27, 1990May 19, 1992Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US5987779 *Apr 17, 1996Nov 23, 1999Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US6026593 *Dec 5, 1997Feb 22, 2000New Balance Athletic Shoe, Inc.Shoe sole cushion
US6253466May 24, 1999Jul 3, 2001New Balance Athletic Shoe, Inc.Shoe sloe cushion
US6785985Jul 2, 2002Sep 7, 2004Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US6988329Mar 4, 2005Jan 24, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7010870Jul 1, 2003Mar 14, 2006Totes Isotoner CorporationTufted foam insole and tufted footwear
US7047670Jul 2, 2003May 23, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7152625May 24, 2004Dec 26, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Combination check valve and release valve
US7278445Jul 12, 2004Oct 9, 2007Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7337560Oct 28, 2005Mar 4, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7340851Mar 29, 2006Mar 11, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7383648Feb 23, 2005Jun 10, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US7448150Feb 28, 2005Nov 11, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Insert with variable cushioning and support and article of footwear containing same
US7513067Jan 12, 2006Apr 7, 2009Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7600331May 19, 2008Oct 13, 2009Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US7622014Jul 1, 2005Nov 24, 2009Reebok International Ltd.Method for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
US7694438Dec 13, 2006Apr 13, 2010Reebok International Ltd.Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US7721465Jan 4, 2008May 25, 2010Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7735241Jan 11, 2006Jun 15, 2010Reebok International, Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US7784196Dec 13, 2006Aug 31, 2010Reebok International Ltd.Article of footwear having an inflatable ground engaging surface
US7930839Oct 7, 2009Apr 26, 2011Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US7934521Dec 20, 2006May 3, 2011Reebok International, Ltd.Configurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US8037623Jun 29, 2006Oct 18, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a fluid system
US8151489Apr 9, 2010Apr 10, 2012Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US8230874Oct 7, 2008Jul 31, 2012Reebok International LimitedConfigurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US8256141Apr 7, 2009Sep 4, 2012Reebok International LimitedArticle of footwear having an adjustable ride
US8414275Jan 11, 2007Apr 9, 2013Reebok International LimitedPump and valve combination for an article of footwear incorporating an inflatable bladder
US8540838Nov 23, 2009Sep 24, 2013Reebok International LimitedMethod for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
US8572786Oct 12, 2010Nov 5, 2013Reebok International LimitedMethod for manufacturing inflatable bladders for use in footwear and other articles of manufacture
US8677652Mar 9, 2012Mar 25, 2014Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
USRE34102 *May 14, 1991Oct 20, 1992Energaire CorporationThrust producing shoe sole and heel
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/29
International ClassificationA43B13/20, A43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/20
European ClassificationA43B13/20