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Publication numberUS2678040 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1954
Filing dateMar 16, 1953
Priority dateMar 16, 1953
Publication numberUS 2678040 A, US 2678040A, US-A-2678040, US2678040 A, US2678040A
InventorsClark David M, Poole Forrest R
Original AssigneeClark
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sphygmomanometer in the form of a cuff
US 2678040 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 11, 1954 F. R. POOLE ET AL 2,678,040

SPHYGMOMANOMETER IN THE FORM OF A CUF F' Filed March 16, 1955 INVENTORJ /Tomfsr E BY @Av/ /lz (www Patented May 11, 1954 SPHYGMOMANOMETER IN THE FORM OF A CUFF Forrest R. Poole and David M. Clark, Worcester, Mass.; said Poole assigner to said Clark Application March 16, 1953, Serial No. 342,628

5 Claims.

This invention relates to a novel blood pres- Sllle measuring apparatus OI Sphygmol'l'lanomelel,

and the principal object of the present invention is to make the same of a new construction which is simple enough for self-application by the person wishing to determine his blood pressure. There are those who require the taking of their blood pressure daily, or at less frequent intervals, and in the prior art, this has only been possible by having someone else apply the sphygmomanometer and take the readings, but by means of the present invention the person conveniently is enabled to take the readings himself as often as he wishes.

Another object of the invention resides in the provision of a sphygmomanometer which is of particularly light weight and easy in application and is made in the form of an annulus or cuff which can be slipped up the arm by the person using it and this cuff is provided with an iniiating bulb which may be operated by the hand of the limb upon which the cuff is applied, and the cuff also is provided with a gauge which is set so that the person taking the pressure may read it directly, as the hand is engaged in pumping the air pressure.

Further objects of the invention resides in the provision of a non-stretchable sphygmomanometer in the form of a cuff including an inner bladder made of fabric, water-proofed by means of a coating, said bladder being formed of two parts in the form of an annulus, the inner part being larger than the outer part and overlapping the outer part at the edges, said bladder being covered by a fabric envelope made in the form of an annulus and having a larger inner part secured to a smaller outer part, none of the parts being stretchable in any way, all to the end that the cuii sphygmomanometer may be pumped up to a condition wherein the inner part thereof impinges upon the limb of the user without any pressure being registered upon the dial, so that an absolutely accurate reading is obtainable as distinct from sphygmomanometers using rubber bladders which require pressure to stretch them out even before pressure is applied to the users limb.

The invention further relates to arrangements and combinations of parts which will be hereinafter described and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a View in elevation showing the outside of the device flat and deflated;

Fig. 2 is an end view on a smaller scale illustrating the sphygmomanometer pumped up sufficiently for the inner fabric member parts to just contact each other and illustrating that the gauge is still uneffected and registers Zero;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional View showing the outer envelope;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view on the same scale as Fig. 3 and showing the inner bladder;

Fig. 5 is a View in elevation of the bladder;

Fig. 6 is a sectional View on a reduced scale of the entire device; and

Fig. 7 is an enlarged section through the seam of the inner bladder and the outer envelope.

In the first place, it is emphasized that the entire sphygmomanometer in the present oase is made of non-stretchable fabric, preferably nylon, and it comprises an outer annular envelope or cover and an inner annular coated bladder, neither of which is stretchable, and the inner bladder being larger than the envelope. Each annular member, i. e. the cover and the bladder, comprises two parts, an inner part and an outer part, and each inner part is wider than the outer part, overlapping the latter at the edges.

The sphygmomanometer is shown generally in Fig. 1 wherein the outer fabric member of the envelope is indicated at l0. When uninflated,

the inner part of the outer envelope is visible as at l2, the two parts being secured by a seam lli. Extending through the outer part I0 are a pair of nipples I6 and I8, and the hole in member Il] through which they protrude is preferably made by heat so as to prevent any unravelling of the outer part I0.

The envelope is shown enlarged in Fig. 3 wherein the outer part l0 is disclosed of a certain length and the inner part l2 there is disclosed as having a greater length. This fact is of importance and is thus emphasized. The same construction obtains as to the inner bladder (Figs. 4 and 5) wherein the outer part thereof 20 is smaller than the inner part thereof at 22 and the latter is apparent at the edges of the bladder (see Fig. 5). The nipples I6 and t8 are hermetically sealed to the outer member 20 to provide access from the exterior of the sphygmomanometer to the interior of the bladder.

The outer part 20 of the inner bladder is provided with a series of laterally extending tabs 254 which are used to secure the bladder to the envelope or cover and which prevent any relative shifting of one with respect to the other. These tabs are folded over as at 28 (see Fig. 7). They are then sewed to the inner part i2 of the cover as at 28, and the part l2 is then sewed at 39 to the outer part l0. All of these seams are made after turning the edges of the respective members inwardly and the inner part 22 of the bladder is secured to the outer part 20 thereof in the same manner as at 32 although this particular seam may be made adhesively or by heat or pressure sealing.

The dial gauge 34 applied to one of the nipples I6 or It, and the bulb 36 applied to the other nipple, may be conventional and well known and form no part of the present invention except that the position of the gauge 34 is such as to be easily readable with the sphygomomanometer cuff in place on the arm, and the bulb has a tube 38 so that if the cuff is placed upon the left arm, the left hand may be easily used to inflate the device while the right hand is then free for determining the pulse, and both diastolic and systolic readings are easily obtained by the operator of the device himself.

Referring now to Figs. 2 and 6,A there is shown the sphygmomanometer wherein the bulb 36 has been pumped enough to just cause the inner members of the device to come together without exerting any pressure on each other. This has taken several strokes of the bulb but does not create any pressure within the device and this in turn is due to the construction above described wherein the inner part 22 of the bladder and the inner part I2 of the envelope are both larger than the respective outer parts thereof and this provides sufficient material for the effect described, it being remembered that none of the material is stretchable.

Therefore it will be seen that they smallest limb may be placed in the cuf, and when such limb is impinged upon by the inner parts i2 (22) as shown in Fig. 6, the reading will be zero on the gauge until actual pressure is applied to the member, and thus an absolutely accurate reading is obtained with the sphygmomanometer cuff of the present invention. If there were any stretching of the fabric, then there would be pressure required to occasion such stretching and thus in Figs. 2 and 6 there would be a reading on 'the dial even though there were no -pressure exerted on a member in the cuff.

he above also goes to show why the single cuff be applied to any limb of any size and no adjustment of any kind is necessary. The present device accurately determines the desired pressure reading on the smallest limb up to and including any limb which may be thrust into the cui when it is entirely evacuated. Valve means may be applied to the bulb so that the thumb of hand in which the bulb is held and by which it is squeezed may easily provide for evacuation ef the air so as toobtain both the diastolic and systolic pressures with the one application of the device.

It is also an important part of the present in vention to provide against any ballooning of the outer members and of course this is accomplished because the materials are non-stretchable and also because the outer members are smaller than the inner members as above described, so that once the inner circumference is in contact with any object or limb, all pressure is directed inwardly, all of the pressure is all about such object or limb. There is no one spot pressure applied to a singie position, and there are no gaps in the pressure which is even all about the object or limb, so that complete occlusion is accomplished.

The novel sphygmomanometer cuff will not roll upon the limb and there is nothing in the construction of the present device to crack, pinch or irritate as is the case in articles made of rubber. The present device does not blanch the skin or leave any marks on the skin surface. No complicated stays, hooks, or reenforcements are needed and the blood pressure is completely accurate and has equal pressure thereabout regardless of the degree of the pressure, as distinct from the case of the usual wrap-around device, etc. of the prior art.

We claim:

1. A self-applied sphygmomanometer in the form of an annulus adapted to be slid upon the limb of the user, a gauge and pressure bulb attached to the sphygmomanometer, the gauge facing the user and the bulb being operable by the hand of the limb to which the sphygmomanometer is applied, the other hand of the user being free to aid in determining pulse, said sphygmomanometer comprising non-stretchable material and the interior wall of the annulus being loose and full and greater in extent that the exterior wall thereof.

2. A self-applied sphygmomanometer in the of a cuif and comprising an annular cover and an annular bladder in the cover, a pressure indicating gauge and a pressure bulb connected to the bladder, the material of the cover and bladder both being non-stretchable and the interior part of the bladder being greater in extent the exterior part thereof so that the interior part of the bladder becomes pressed inwardiy upon itself upon the application of air thro-ugh the bulb into the bladder and the sphygmomanometer fails to become distended outwardly.

3. A self-applicable sphygmomanometer in the form of an annulus, said sphygmomanometer comprising an inner bladder, and an outer covering, the bladder and covering each comprising two parts, one part forming an inner wall and the part forming an outer wall as regards the annulus, each inner wall being greater in extent than the respective outer walls and providing for distortion inwardly toward the center of the annulus but not outwardly thereof so that all the pressure of the sphygmomanometer is inwardly directed.

4. A self-applicable sphygmoinanometer in the form of an annulus, said sphygmomanometer comprising an inner bladder, and an outer covering, the bladder and covering each comprising two parts, one part forming an inner wall and the part forming an outer wall as regards the annulus, each inner wall being greater in extent than the respective outer walls and providing for distortion inwardly toward the center of the an nulus but not outwardly thereof so that all the pressure of the sphygmomanometer is inwardly directed, and impinges upon any size of limb in the annulus, the bladder and covering parts being non-stretchable.

5. A self-applicable sphygmomanometer in the form of an annulus, said sphygmomanometer comprising an inner bladder and an outer covering, the bladder and covering each comprising two parts, one part forming an inner wall and the part forming an outer wall as regards the annulus, each inner wall being greate in extent than the respective outer walls and providing for distortion inwardly toward the center of the annulus but not outwardly thereof so that all the pressure of the sphygmomanometer is inwardly directed and impingesupon any size of limb in the annulus, the bladder and covering parts being non-stretchable woven fabric, the bladder being coated and impervious, and means securing the bladder to the covering.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3040737 *Dec 10, 1959Jun 26, 1962Honeywell Regulator CoBlood pressure measuring transducer
US3120846 *Sep 12, 1962Feb 11, 1964Daniel A FletcherPneumatic tourniquet
US3473525 *May 15, 1967Oct 21, 1969W A Baum Co IncDisposable sphygmomanometer cuff
US3760795 *Jan 12, 1972Sep 25, 1973Siemens AgSleeve for measuring blood pressure
US5511551 *Mar 15, 1994Apr 30, 1996Omron CorporationCuff for blood pressure meter
US7166077Feb 3, 2004Jan 23, 2007Pharma-Smart, LlcCuff for measurement of blood pressure
US7427268Jul 26, 2004Sep 23, 2008Pharma-Smart, LlcRing-shaped cuff for measurement of blood pressure
US7722542 *Jun 5, 2003May 25, 2010Welch Allyn, Inc.Blood pressure measuring apparatus
US7780603Sep 19, 2005Aug 24, 2010Welch Allyn, Inc.Blood pressure measuring apparatus
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US8652057Feb 12, 2010Feb 18, 2014Welch Allyn, Inc.Recyclable or biodegradable blood pressure cuff
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US20060217618 *Sep 19, 2005Sep 28, 2006Welch Allyn, Inc.Blood pressure measuring apparatus
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US20090318818 *Dec 24, 2009Welch Allyn, Inc.Blood pressure monitoring system
US20100016737 *Jan 21, 2010Welch Allyn, Inc.Electro pneumatic interface for blood pressure system
US20100298724 *May 19, 2009Nov 25, 2010Welch Allyn, Inc.Recyclable or biodegradable blood pressure cuff
US20100298725 *Feb 12, 2010Nov 25, 2010Vivenzio Robert LRecyclable or biodegradable blood pressure cuff
USD643536Dec 2, 2010Aug 16, 2011Welch Allyn, Inc.Blood-pressure cuff
EP0615722A1 *Mar 15, 1994Sep 21, 1994Omron CorporationCuff for blood pressure meter
EP2080479A2 *May 10, 2006Jul 22, 2009Western clinical engineering, Ltd.Tourniquet cuff with improved pneumatic passageway
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/499
International ClassificationA61B5/022
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/02233
European ClassificationA61B5/022D