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Publication numberUS2679063 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1954
Filing dateAug 3, 1950
Priority dateSep 30, 1949
Publication numberUS 2679063 A, US 2679063A, US-A-2679063, US2679063 A, US2679063A
InventorsJosef Hoffmann Franz
Original AssigneeJosef Hoffmann Franz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient brush
US 2679063 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 25, 1954 F. J. HOFFMANN 2,679,063

RESILIENT BRUSH Filed Aug. 3, 1950 Patented May 25, 1954 ITED STATES FFICE Claims priority, application Austria September 30, 1949 2 Claims.

This invention relates to resilient brushes.

As compared with rigid brushes, resilient ones have the advantage that the bristle tips can be adjusted to a high degree to the surface to be treated.

Flexible or resilient brushes are known in which the bristles are ixed either by means of a binding medium, such as hemp or wire (as disclosed in the German Patent No. 71,274), which is not expanded when the brush is being deformed, or by means of spherical heads provided on the massage pins or bristle bundles and xed' in the bristle carrier (as disclosed in the British Patent No. 17,492, A. D. 1914).

The brush embodying this invention is advantageously distinguished from the known types in that the several bundles of bristles, or massage pins, are fixed by means of convex-top heads not in the resilient bristle carrier, but supercially behind the same, and that the bristles are loose- 1y iitted in holes in the bristle carrier.

A brush embodying the invention is shown by way of example in the drawings, in which Figs. l and 2 are sectional views showing the brush in two different positions, and

Fig. 3 illustrates the shape of the bristle heads and a few of the possible methods of iixing J@he bristles.

i is a plate from rnoss rubber or a similar material and used as a bristle carrier. Combining high strength and elasticity this plate, as shown in the drawing, has a core formed with a multitude of hollow cells closed from each other, and on both sides of said core a closed surface layer less resilient than said core. translation of the German word Moosgummi or the French caoutchouc mousse and is de- Y scribed, e. in Germany Patents Nos. 114,250;

160,710; and 821,423. A. sponge rubber plate or body i., of a known type, is combined with the bristle carrie" to form an elastic brush body. The sponge rubber plate fi holds the heads 3 against the bristle carrier. Owing to its spongelike nature the plate as an additional cleaning means, substantially increases the range of application of the brush.

The bristle bundles 2 or massage pins have heads 3 of any suitable material, such as sheet metal or plastics, in which the bristles are ixed, e. g., by means of wire loops or ties, or by cementing or vulcanizing. Where the material of the bristles permits they may directly be provided with heads in dipping or fusing processes.

The outside shape of the heads, similar to a lens, in particular to a spherical cap, is essential Moss rubber is the to enable the bristle bundles 2, xed in the heads, to be pushed from below into the nished brush body, which consists of the moss rubber plate l and the sponge rubber plate d. Furthermore, it is essential that the bottom surface 5 of the heads be flat or concave so as to superficially bear against the strong upper skin of the plate made from moss rubber or an equivalent material. The sponge rubber plate is somewhat displaced when the heads are being pushed in and ensures that the heads are held iirmly by the pressure exercised upon the same.

The loose lit of the bundles of bristles in the moss rubber plate gives the brush favorable properties in view of the nature of the human and animal epidermis. Outwardly bulging portions, being less susceptible than hollow ones, and extremities require harder and denser bristles. When the brush hugs an extremity the pressure exercised by the moss and sponge rubber plates causes the heads to assume a position in which the plane defined by them is tangential in respect of the curvature whereas the bristles assume a radial position. The bristles are then closer to each other and the strong lower skin layer of the bristle carrier clamps the bristles fast so that they are given a harder effect. The opposite effect is observed when the brush is bulged outwardly, e. g., at a hollow portion of the body.

What 1' claim is:

1. In a brush comprising a resilient body, the combination of a rubber plate comprising a core formed with a plurality of hollow cells closed from each other and having on both sides of said core a closed surface layer less resilient than said core, said plate being xedly connected to said body with one of said surface layers and having a plurality of holes extending through said surface layers and core, and' a plurality of bristle inembers consisting of material sufficiently resilient to deflect under brushing pressure, each of said bristle members extending as a loose t in one of said holes through the core of said plate and beyond the outer surface layer thereof, which is remote from said body, and carrying a convextop head retained between said body and rubber plate.

2. In a brush comprising a resilient body, the combination of a rubber plate comprising a core formed with a plurality of hollow cells closed from each other and having on both sides of said core a closed surface layer less resilient than. said core, said plate being xedly connected to said body with one of said surface layers and having a plurality of holes extending through said surface layers and core, and a plurality of bristle members consisting of material suiciently resilient to deflect under brushing pressure, each of said bristle members extending as a loose t in one of said holes through the core of said plate and beyond the outer surface layer thereof, which is remote from said body, and carrying a convex-top head retained between said body and' rubber plate, the thickness of said rubber plate, the width of said holes and the thickness of said bristle members in said holes being so related that said outer surface layer when outwardly concavely deformed is adapted to clamp and when outwardly convexly formed is adapted to release said bristle member, whereby the effective length and resiliency of said bristle members is varied in dependence of the shape in which said outer surface layer is deformed.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 10 Number Name Date Alexander Jan. 11, 1921 Snell May 1, 1934 Wybrants May 18, 1948 Neff et al Sept. 27, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Australia Mar. 18, 1932 Italy Oct. 27, 1947 Germany Mar. 1, 1930 France Nov. 8, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1364971 *Aug 24, 1915Jan 11, 1921Henry L Hughes Co IncBrush
US1957363 *Feb 18, 1933May 1, 1934British Xylonite Co LtdBrush
US2441682 *Jan 13, 1947May 18, 1948Wybrants Wade MMassage head
US2482928 *Mar 26, 1948Sep 27, 1949Neff AugustaNeedle hairbrush
AU254131A * Title not available
DE492752C *Mar 1, 1930August Constantine SakowichAuswechselbares Tuepfelglied fuer eine Tuepfelbuerste
FR944767A * Title not available
IT426495B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2819482 *Aug 5, 1954Jan 14, 1958Eugene F TraubTooth cleaning and gum massaging instrument
US2825084 *Apr 16, 1956Mar 4, 1958Nat Lab IncApplicator having compressible plastic holder
US2935755 *Oct 14, 1955May 10, 1960Ramon Leira AlbertoTooth-brushes and the like
US3256546 *Dec 2, 1963Jun 21, 1966Herbert SchmidtBrush belt, especially for rotary brushes
US3641610 *Feb 11, 1970Feb 15, 1972Tucel IndustriesArtificial tufted sponges
US3831358 *May 4, 1972Aug 27, 1974Goodyear Tire & RubberBelt and connecting means therefor
US4104759 *May 2, 1977Aug 8, 1978Odhner Oliver RCustodial eraser
US6592532 *Jun 27, 2002Jul 15, 2003Yeng-Shung HaungMassage rod
US8141194 *May 4, 2005Mar 27, 2012Gavney Jr James AAbsorbent structures with integrated contact elements
US8250698 *Jan 31, 2007Aug 28, 2012Gavney Jr James AHybrid cleaning device including absorbent and contact elements
US8495785 *Nov 13, 2009Jul 30, 2013Paul Eugene TriulziAdvanced cleaning tool
US8566998 *Feb 23, 2012Oct 29, 2013James A. Gavney, Jr.Absorbent structures with integrated contact elements
US20100116291 *Nov 13, 2009May 13, 2010Paul Eugene TriulziAdvanced cleaning tool
US20120151699 *Feb 23, 2012Jun 21, 2012Gavney Jr James AAbsorbent structures with integrated contact elements
US20120284942 *Jul 17, 2012Nov 15, 2012Gavney Jr James AHybrid cleaning device including absorbent and contact elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/186, 15/114, 601/137
International ClassificationA46B7/00, A46B7/06, A46B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA46B5/00, A46B5/0029, A46B7/06, A46B7/00
European ClassificationA46B5/00B1A, A46B7/06, A46B7/00, A46B5/00