Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2679214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1954
Filing dateOct 14, 1949
Priority dateOct 14, 1949
Publication numberUS 2679214 A, US 2679214A, US-A-2679214, US2679214 A, US2679214A
InventorsMichael Nampa Sulo
Original AssigneeEvans Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Freight loading
US 2679214 A
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 25, 1954 s. M. NAMPA 2,679,214

' FREIGHT LOADING l l lll www l" 1* May 25, 1954 s. M. NAMPA FREIGHT LOADING 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 14, 1949 May 25, 1954 s. M. NAMPA FREIGHT LOADING Filed oct. 14, 1949 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR y MTORNEYS.

May 25, 1954 s. M. NAMPA FREIGHT LOADING 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Oct. 14, 1949 INVEN'IOR l Suze yawya.

,MVM

MTORNEKS.

--I i Y--I May 25, 1954 s. M. NAMPA FREIGHT LOADING 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 14, 1949 lh. @bhv n. S

\ lxwfx'lnk Sula M )Valar/q n/aal I Ym" A'rloRNEYS.

Patented May 25, `1954 UNITED rATe-s Parmi* @Feroe FREIGHT LOADING .S1110 Michael Nampa, Detroit, Mich., yassigner yto `Evans Products Company,'Plymouth, Mich., a corporation of Delaware Application-'Octob'er 14, 1949, Serial No. 121,424

,This f application Ais acontinuation-impart of applicants-:copendingapplication, Serial `No. 469,71'9f11ed YDecember' 2l, 1942 (nowabandoned) ya'swa'. continuation-impart of application Serial No.-i-43.4,357i:filed March 12,1942, now abandoned but replaced b5/- continuation application` Serial Non'ilgSSOg-lled"April 9, '1947, now Patent No.

Y The present'finvention relates to improved :loading apparatusvfor holding freight articles of difrerenttypes infvehicles "or storage spaces,4 and more particularlyfto improved'equipment of this 'naturelhaving certainI parts which v`areV built into oricombinediwithfa -velfiiclefsuch asa railway freightrcanor other 'storage space, and having 'certain' otheri rparts whi`cl1r"'arel adjustably and variously cooperable'with the builtlin parts, the several=,'parts nfthe equipment cooperating to noldfthatlis; for ieXa-mple, rto brace, support or carry, space; wedge: 'orf` provide shelves, *partitions, or bins for) a Wideuva'rielty of freight articles.

Applioantsaboveeidentified parent l'application 'disclosesand 'claimscertainfeatures of a loading organizationiwhich, as speciiically disclosed, vcoin-- Vprisesfltvvo `series 'of upright supporting members arranged attherespe'ctively oppositeisides of, and permanently Ysecuredto a freight car; 'wall memybers"fwhich areadjustably and removably lsupported bylthe upri'ghts; and cross members which are disposed tobesupported attheir ends by wall members:atthe'iopposite'sides of the car, so that the crossnmeinb'ers extend acrossthe car.` The cross members may be used to form or to'support blkhea'dsyto form or support decking arrange'- mentsgftio supportoooperating upright and horizontal members-ntilizedfto subdivide the storage spacelongitdinally, as well as for' a variety of otherlpurposes, allas 'set' forth v'rith greater pare tlcularity in the parent application.

The inventive features tobe claimed in `this application are in a'generic sense applicableto a wide-variety of diiferent freight loading arrangements,'b`utin a more-'restricted sense .andas to atleast certain of their aspects, they have particular utility when embodied' in freightil'oading arrangements 'of the 'general type described above. In certain of itheira'spects,"also,"'these irmentive'features `provide improved Vjcombin'ai tions 'of (freight loading elements,` 'and Ain* "certain of Ltheirother; aspects they provide'i 'improved freight "loadingelem'ents' perse. K v

With'the -above as W'elllas other considerations in'view, theiprincip'al' objects 'of rthe present Jin'- arrangements which are simple in construction, sturdyflowin cost and in Weight,- and reliable andeicient in operation; `to provide improved is n rotatably` adjustable about vthe `longitudinal axis of the member; tto provide such arrangements wherein the holdingwniembercompriscs end portions engageable withccoperati-ng'supporting-,meansr and has. an intermediate or holding portion whichis rotatable relative to the end portions; to provide 'such v arrangements wherein one or bothof :the end portionsfisc-adjustable relative to-.ithe `intermediate vportionfso as i to, enable.- the length of the' member -to beadjusted -to i provide such :arrangements wherein .the engaging'portions'of thegrriembers arefprovided with toothlike projections which mutually interlock ato 'secure the `members togetheriand which. :readily permit adjustments Yand i permit a very close spacing betweenl Ldiierent ladj-usted' positions; and to provide #improvedfforms of cross barsforimembers'which are 'of high strength, have cushioning: `or buierfsu'rfaces, ,are of adjustable iength rto 'take care of .variations in carfwidth,

andarerotatable or: tiltable to permit angular.. positioning of'theirflat faces .to brace'ifrei'ght surfaces-'atzfsuch angles.

Gther and more detailed-objects ofthe 'inven tion appearrin the following description and in the appended fclai'ms.

`In .the drawings, which 'showpr'eferred butillustrative embodiments ofi-the invention, and throughout the 'several-'views of Which-corre- 'spondingre'ference characters vare-used to desig- -n'a'te -corresponding -parts `il'igure 1 vis a general view in perspective 'o f va freight holding ararngement embodying Vthe `Vvinvention andwhich'is builtinto one end of'an otherwise conventional freight' car structure;

*Figi 2 is afragmentary viewl inperspective lof a 'different arrangement, yfurther illustrating the adaptability 'of the" invention;

Fig;` 2A a view in section, 'taken'V along'the line 2A `2A of'Fig. 2; L

Fig." 3l "is a fragmentary view in" perspective illustrating the-connection between a wall mem-l ber and a cooperating vertical supportingnieinber;

""Fig. 4 is a'viewin' horizontal section, taken along theilineil-M offFig; 1; y g g l""iiig. 5` is a view lin side 'elevation of the V'structiir'e 3 shown in Fig. 3 and taken along the line 5--5 thereof;

Fig. 5A is a sectional view, taken along the line Sii-5A of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a view based upon Fig. 5, but showing the preferred method of applying or removing the wall members to or from the upright supporting members;

Fig. '7 is a view in elevation of a wall member;

Fig. 8 is a plan view of a cross member embodying the invention;

Fig. 9 is a view in side elevation of the structure of Fig. 8;

Figs. 10 and 11 are views in vertical transverse section taken, respectively, along the lines Iii-lc and H-ll of Fig. 3;

Fig. 12 is a View in vertical transverse section, taken along the line i2-l2 of Fig. 9;

Figs. 13 and 14 are views, respectively, in plan and in side elevation of a modified construction of cross member;

Figs. 15 and 16 are views, respectively, in plan and in side elevation of a further modified construction of cross member which embodies the telescopic feature of the members shown in Figs. 8 through 14, and further embodies the hereinafter described rotatable feature;

Figs. 17, 18 and 19 are views in vertical transverse section taken, respectively, along the lines vlE--l'l, iS-li and lS-li of Figs. 15 and 16, lines li-H and ISB- I9 appearing on Fig. 16 and line lt-l 8 appearing on Fig. 15;

Fig. 2) is a view in plan of a further modified constructidi of cross member;

Figs. 21 through 24 are views in section, taken, respectively, along the lines 2I--2l, 22-22, 223-23, and 24-24 of Fig. 20; and

Figs. 25 and 26 are perspective views illustrating the construction and manner of use of a wedging tool which is preferably used in connection with the invention.

As aforesaid, it will be appreciated from a cornplete understanding of the inventive features to be claimed in this application, that in a generic sense they may be embodied in or used with a wide variety of freight holding systems, and these features may partake of various different constructions. The disclosure of these features in particular forms, and as embodied in or used with particular types of loading apparatus, is

consequently to be regarded in an illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Referring first to Fig. l, the illustrated arrangement ccmprises generally corresponding series of upright supporting members arranged in aligned relationship at the opposite Sides of a freight car 32; a series of wall members 34 which are disposed at opposite sides of the car and are adjustably supported by and between adjacent pairs of uprights 3i); a series of cross members 5t, the length whereof is adjustable, as described below; and a cross member 38, the length whereof is adjustable, but which also comprises a rotatable mid or freight-engaging seotion 4b. It will be understood that, if desired, both ends of the freight car may be equipped as indicated for the one end in Fig. 1 and that, in fact, in usual practice both ends would be so equipped. A description of the equipment for one end of the car is thus thought to be sumcient.

As described in the parent application, the uprights 39 may themselves constitute the vertical members of the car structure. Preferably and as shown, however, particularly in Fig. 4, the upi rights 30 are relatively wide plate-1ike members, which are secured to the inner faces 42 of the corresponding car uprights 44. As shown in Fig. a, these uprights 44 are of usual outwardly presenting channel form, having outwardly turned flanges 46 to which the outer paneling 48 of the car is secured, as by means of rivets 5D. It will be understood that the uprights 44 may be conventionally secured to the loor and roof structures 52 and 54 of the car. The uprights 3D are illustrated as being welded, as indicated at 56, to the associated car uprights 44, and it will be understood that the welded joints may extend continuously or interruptedly throughout the full length of the uprights 3D. It is to be noted that it is preferred to use uprights 33 of relatively heavy metal, so that these uprights, in addition to affording a support for the cooperating freight loading elements, also serve to reinforce and strengthen the car structure as a whole.

As shown, the uprights 33 extend from the floor of the car entirely to the roof structurey although it will be understood that for certain classes of loading, in which the unit weight of the freight is too large to permit loading of the car entirely to the roof, the uprights 30 may be extended only part way from the floor to the ceiling.

For cooperation with the hereinafter described wall members 34, each upright 30 is provided on its outer face with two vertical rows of evenly spaced, toothlike projections 60, the crowns and roots whereof are preferably of rounded form and which projections 69, consequently, are of racklike form. This construction alfords, as described below, a very efficient, adjustable connection between the wall members and the uprights, which allows a very close spacing, for example, one-half inch, between adjusted positions. Teeth 6G may be variously applied to the uprights 3Q, and are illustrated as formed separately therefrom on convenient lengths 5I, which are secured, as by welding, to the uprights.

It will be understood that preparatory to the installation of the uprights, it is preferred to remove the usual wood paneling or lining of the car, which lining normally affords a buffer surface for the freight. In order to provide such a buffer surface, it is preferred to maintain the inner surfaces of the uprights 33 free of projecting portions, and it is further preferred to secure panels, such as G2, to the car walls, in the spaces between the uprights 30, the inner faces of the panels 62 being substantially flush with, but projecting slightly inwardly of, the surfaces of the uprights 3i). The panels 6-2 may be formed of wood or other like material and, desirably, may be provided with graduations or markings 64 so as to facilitate the location of the wall members, at opposite sides of the car, at the same elevation. In order to accommodate the cross members 311, a space designated a in Fig. l is left between the opposed edges of each upright 30 and the adjacent panel 6.2. Various means for securing the panels 62 to the car structure are described in the parent application and need not be described here.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1, 3, 5, 5A and '7, the wall members 34 are illustrated as comprising generally an angle member 76, the longer flange 10a whereof is arranged vertically and the shorter flange lllib is arranged horizontally. The shorter flange 10b is provided on its upper surface with a series of tooth-like projections 60, which are similar in form to the previously mentioned projections and which may, in fact, be identical therewith. As shown in Fig. 3, the

;Dmections 5.0 .vare `rrfonrled seramatelys..tromav the a...nl igle member-"I0 and .are ffsecured thereto ylas by welding/.1 at 'thefpoints 12. It-will.; be eappre- .,ciated...that` the use -ofga ,-plurality-.otfsuch teeth .801. is-advantageous'fsince. the.A load.v :may -thus :be

...divided betweenthem. f This..al1ows :the (usef-of .relatively small,y -closely spaced 'teethf and :con- .sequently.providesa #very .-closef-spacngbetween successive radjusted positions .of .the 11 members. .such astiA and :38, which .are :supported: by.. .the wallmembers ,3-4. .The-length 'of.-each.member' 34 isrsubstantially equal to the center...1ine.,distance between adjacent .uprightsz 30. z Thus, .the meml bers 34. in ...successive .bays .may abe vertically .aligned witheach other and thef-.teethf-BU *thereon lform a.. continuous zseries vof .teeth over .whichea cOOperating .cross member, as 36, .mayrbezmoved as described below. `Itvwillbe inoted from-Fig; 7 .that the. teeth 60 are-sd proportioned that; ,allowvv...for v.a ``slight spacing between f the =.ends `:of y.successive ywall @members 34, f the end .ftooth on .onemember 34is-spaoed from the-end tooth-on .theeadjacentubar bylsubstantialgly the same-,distance .as the .spacing lbetween 4adjacent teeth-:B0

ontheindividual members. This allows tt-hejust- .mentioned `,continuous movement. of a cross .rmember3\6,.: for example, fromonewallfmember 34 .to the .-next succeeding Fone.

. .Each end .of .each angle member' 1-0ris .provided WithfaforgedA olv-.otherwise formed bracket 114, having .abaseyportion 16, which abuts and is sercured to' the outer: face. l(considered from.. the yinside-of the car)n ofthecorrespondingangle member.,-'I0. ..Each.bracket-l4. also has an npperand outwardly oiTset portion .18, the inner andverticalface whereof vis provided witha series of tooth- .likeprojections .80, .which -are-.complemental vto v.the previously .described Atooth-like projections 6.0.on theLu-pright.

@Thebracket 1.4 alsocomprises -a wall or Web T82 .which .extends between .the .base 16. andthe toothed portion 18. `When thevvall member 34 islocatedbetween adjacent .uprights -30, the -walls v.0r Webs 82 vat `therespective `ends of `the, member lie near enough to the opposededgesofthe up- ,di

rights v30 andflimit themovement of the-wall memberv 34' longitudinally of thefcaiglbut aresuiliciently spaced therefrom to allow f .the ...endwise .tilting discussed below.

Preferably and as illustrated, each .crossmember 34A is .provided .at its underside with a .buiier bar' .84, made .of wood, .for example,-.and.which,is secured to the angle member .'l-Ulby means of studs 86 passed through vthelblilfer and ...through the base "lr6 of each'bracket 74. -As..most.clea`r1y appears inFig.' 5, thebuiersill extend'inwardly ofthecar a distance slightlyinexcess of' the ldistancerepresentecl by the flanges'lb. The' buffers 84 presenta relatively large surface to the .freight and prevent the same from' being injured-.byk being pushedjagainst the toothed 'Iianges 'The wallmembers 34 are shown injFigs. .1,3 andiin the applied or connecte'clpositions, lin which' the outer'faces of the flanges 10a thereof bear against'the inner faces 'of vthe corresponding .uprights .30, 4and `in which the toothlike Aprojections 80 iareinterlocked witha correspondingnumberoftheY teeth 60"011 theouter faces to! theuprightsfm "Ihelcenterof'massof eachwall Y ,memberi34 isipositione'dtothe"leftjas viewed in 1 Fig. 5, 'of thejunction betweenthebearing areas 10a 'and the `uprights 30. '.Consequently, leven while in an unloaded vconditionfthe "weight of eachpwall Ymember :'34 urges it in a counterclockwise "direction, Habout `its vlongitukiinal axis, as

.viewedvfin Eig. ,f1 and tserves: sto hold'. thesniathg' Itoothflike projections l`8.0'v andas zgfin'fproperlysin- 'fterlocked r-relationzsto` eacheother. biasing .spring, .such :fas .90, .1. may tbe fprovide'd yat eachfendof each vmetnberft1,iso asito positively urge the member in .thefjustementionedinterlock- ...ing direction. Itfwvill beV understood, too, that when .a verticallyj #downward :load .fis applietliito f eachrcross =member-34; such .il'oa'diacts toaaug'rnent -:the,just-mentioned ly`interlocking tendency fi-and holds the tooth-like projections in sol-.idlinterlocki -ing relationship.

` In vorder to adjust Athemembers 34 vertically.

. it i fonly necessary to rock 1 them, #about vtheir silongitudinal ..axis,s inra clockwise 'directionil from the :locked position shownfin Eig.r5'zto :the'ffaddesired position of adjustmentalong' the. uprights A3l). If, -during the course v'ofsuchzan' adjusting movement,` the mem-ber. 30 is released, `the natural tendency i thereof vto `rotate counterclockwisegas :viewed :in Fig. `5, causes :it to :again assumera rlocked' position, even though f thev operator @fails .to `'rock it back to the verticalpositi'on;of`1Fig.f5.

In order to remove .the --yvall vmembers a34i,1it is only necessary to rockthem, as described .:abo1?.e, andr ino-'thereafter ti1tthem,v.so as toA velevateone Aendto position -abovel the other end. ,`fI'his.;.tilting movement brings the horizontal distance be- .tween the :bracket portions 18 'to a'value :less than the vertical spacing 'between the opposed: ed'gesof `the adjacent .uprights1.30, and enablesthe wall .member :34 to be freely withdrawn fthronghthe Aslots rbetween the uprights and the buiergpan-els A'62. .It isjnotedthat the `Width-lof these-slots, in-

dicated atv a in fFig. '1,fissuicienttoaccommo- .date this movement. VA reversemovement-enables `the Amenrrbers'ft4 to be .applied to the uprightst, fas*v will Abe understood.

'In practice, Aa'relat-ively large number offthe -wall members'd are preferably lprovidedfso that each bay (the w area between adjacent .upr-ights .30) ateach side of the'car may. beprovidedwith several wall members. Since the individual wall Ymembers 34 -fare independently adjustable, any

`desired'distribution of the lWall members along the sides of the car may be-provided. .In certain cases, the staggered relation-shown in :most-instances-.in Fig. 1 is utilized. .In other instances, yas where itis desiredto furnish-a car withplatforming or decking, vit is y,desirable to have-a plurality of Wall memberapositionedin. successive .bays'at the same elevationso .asto-.providegin eiect, asingley wallfmembergreater in length than the ywidth of..anyV one bay.

.One of. the .cross .bars .2- is shown` in'. detail .in Figs.. 8.through.12. The intermediate` portionl i100 of themain lengthof the bar is preferably. formed of .wood .so as to present a .satisfactory "'bufier surface"tothe.freight articles engaged thereby and while such intermediateportion mayjif desired, be formed of a. single piece of Woodyitls preferredto `formit of two .similar strips i102 and 104,*which-it will .be vnoted are ...continuous and extend:throughout"substantially the' entire'length of the bar. Also itiwill'be notedthatithelus'e of 'one-piece or"continuouswooden' members, crappreciable cross-section, are simpler and give greater beam strength per unit weight than would be provided by several pieces connected end to end, or by metal pieces interrupted by telescopic and/or swivel fittings. These wooden strips |52 and |04 are stiffened and separated by a steel Z- bar |06, which, as will be understood, may be rolled or otherwise formed into shape. Member |06 has a web portion |01 and oppositely disposed side flanges |08, which extend toward, but not quite to, the edges of the strips |02 and |04. Thus, there are two complete faces of the bar 36 in which there is no exposed metal to injure freight. As to the other two faces, the metal flanges |03 are either fiush with or are slightly behind the wooden surfaces |04a and |02a. Members |02, |04 and |06 are secured together by carriage bolts having heads ||2 and nuts ||4 recessed or countersunk in suitable recesses in the wooden members. bar 36 are provided with heads or jaws |20 and |22, which may be and preferably are identical to each other except in the hereinafter mentioned respects which enable the head to move telescopically into or out of the body of the bar so as to enable the length of the bar to be adjusted.

The head or holding unit |20 comprises a generally U-shaped steel member |24. The base portion of member |24 has a tubular stub shaft |25 secured thereto as by welding. A relatively heavy member |28, which may be a steel casting but is preferably a forging, and which is provided on the underside of its outwardly projecting portion with a series of tooth-like projections |32, is secured within the U-shaped member |24, as by welding along the line indicated at in Fig. 8.

The member |28 is provided with a stifiening rib |36 which extends across its top surface and is provided with an enlarged central bore which receives the post |38. The recessed areas |40 and |42 at either side of the rib |36 may be provided with suitable indicia, such as the arrow and the words Lock and Open, to indicate locking and unlocking positions for the arrow |42 on the top of the post |38. The underside of member |28 is substantially flat except for the previously mentioned outwardly projecting portion which carries the downwardly presenting tooth-like projections |32. of teeth |32 may be utilized, seven being illustrated in Fig. 8. It will be understood, of course, that these teeth are complemental in form to the teeth on the upper surfaces of the wall members 34, so as to enable them to mesh therewith.

The outer ends of the several teeth |32 are joined together by a rib-like member |44 which, consequently, closes the outer ends of the grooves between the several teeth |32. The rib |44 is thus effective to interlock with the ends of the several teeth 60 which mesh with the teeth |32 and prevent axial movement of the head |20 to the right` relative to the member 34, as viewed in Figs. 8 and 9. The other ends of the grooves between successive teeth |32 are closed by the adjacent body portion of the member |28, as is indicated at |46, which body portion, consequently, serves to prevent or limit movement of the head |20 to the left relative to the member 34.

It will be appreciated that in view of the rounded character of the teeth 60 and |32, the cross members 36 may, after having been seated upon the cooperating oppositely disposed members 34, be pushed lengthwise of the members The respectively opposite ends of the Any suitable number 8 34, during which movement the cross bar 36 moves vertically sufficiently to enable the crests of the 4 teeth |32 to ride over the crests of the teeth 60.

In order to prevent vertical dislodgement of the bar 36, there is provided a rotary latch |50, which is either formed integrally with or is fixed to the lower end of the previously mentioned post |38, and the upper end whereof is formed as a hex nut |52, for engagement by a suitable wrench. The latch |50 may also be a forging. The periphery of the body of the latch |50 is shaped, as

-shown in Fig. 8, to have an arcuate portion |54 a nat portion |56. The portions |54 and |56 are joined together by curved portions which define two recesses |58 and |60 for cooperation, respectively, with a stop pin |62 and a detent |64. The stop pin |62 is fitted into the member |28 and projects downwardly for cooperation with the just-mentioned surfaces. The detent |64 comprises a ball which is received in a pocket |66 in the member |28 and is urged to the position shown by a spring |10. The parts are shown in Figs. 8, 9 and l0 in the locked position, in which the rounded locking portion having the surface |54 is disposed below and in substantially abutting relation to the underside of the flange 10b on the cooperating wall member 34. In this position, the pin |62 engages the surface |60 and prevents further rotation of the latch member |50 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 8. fn this position, also, the detent |64 engages the surface |58 and yieldably resists rotation of the latch member |50 in a counterclockwise or unlocking direction. It will be understood, however, that by rotating the nut |52 in a counterclockwise direction, the latch |50 is correspondingly rotated, during which rotation the detent |64 rides along the upper surface. 180 of such rotation brings the latch |50 to the unlocked position in which the pin |62 cooperates with the surface |53 to prevent further such rotation, and in which the detent cooperates with the surface |60 to yieldably hold the latch |50 in the unlocked position. This unlocking movement brings the member |50 out from under the flange 10b on the Wall member 34 and enables the corersponding end of the bar 36 to be freely lifted away from the wall member.

After the latch |50 and the above described cooperating elements are assembled in place relative to the member |28, a supporting plate |1| is welded or otherwise secured to the legs of the U--shaped member |24.

In order to enable the cross bar 36 to be freely adjustable in length, so as to accommodate variations in the width of the car, the previously mentioned tubular post |26 is telescopically received within a fitting comprising two relatively short channel members |12 and |14, which are secured together, as by welding at the points |16, in back-to-back relation. The wood strips |02 and |04 are extended beyond the corresponding end |05a of the Z-bar |05. A leg of the channel member |12 thus abuts the end of one flange |08 of the Z-bar and the opposite legs of the other channel member |14 thus abuts the end of the other flange |08 of the Z-bar. These abutting joints may be completed by welding or otherwise, as will be understood, and, as shown, throughrods |50 may be passed through the strips |02 and |04 and through the flanges of the members |12 and |14 to secure these parts together.

The webs of the channel members |12 and |14 are provided with semicircular portions and locking cam 214, which cam may be and preferably is arranged to be vertically slidable within the opening 212, but is not rotatable therein. The bore 212 opens into the cylindrical sleeve which receives the post 256, and it will be understood that by turning the stud 212, the cam 21d may be drawn upwardly into solid engagement with the surface of the post 255, whereby to clamp or lock the post 256 between the cam 21s and the sleevelike surface on the upper socket portion 255i. The post-engaging face of the cam 214 is complemental to the portion of the post engaged thereby.

The socket 262 may be and preferably is secured to the body of the bar 32 in the manner described for the connection between the socket members |12 and |14 and the body |62 of the bar 36 (Fig. 8).

The right-hand head 252 may be and preferably is constructed as described in connection with the head 252, with the exception that the post 280 associated therewith is of greater length and is provided at its extreme left-hand end with an annular rib or enlargement 282. The post 280 and the rib 282 are received in a socket 2813, which may be and preferably is formed of a single forging. The socket 284 is provided with a bore 285, which snugly but slidably receives the body of the post 280 and is also provided with an enlarged counterbore 288, which snugly but slidably accommodates the annular rib 282. A limit to the inward movement of the head 252 relative to the body of the cross bar 38 is afforded, lof course, by the abutting engagement between the back of the head 252 and the right-hand end of t the socket 284. Similarly, a limit to the lengthening movement of the bar is afforded by the engagement between the annular rib 222 and the right-hand end of the counterbore 28B. It will be understood that the head 252 and the socket 284 may be assembled together by iirst passing the post 280 axially through the socket and by thereafter securing the rib 282 to the post 23B by welding along the joint 290. After the members 252 and 284 are thus assembled together, the socket 2M may be secured to the body of the bar 38 in the manner described in connection with the socket 252.

The modified construction of rotatable cross bar 350, shown in Figs. 20 through 24, may and preferably does duplicate the construction of the bar 38 in many respects. In Figs. 2O through 24, however, the socket members 30| and 322 are formed of stampings instead of being formed of forgings. More particularly, the socket 30! is formed of a pair of channel-shaped stampings I 304 and 325, suitably secured, as by welding, to each other in back-to-back relation. rihe webs of these stampings are provided with semi-circular grooved portions 303, which together define a cylindrical sleeve to slidably receive the post 3H) associated with the head M2. As in the previous instance, the post 3 l 0 is provided with an annular recess 312, which receives ribs 3 l provided in the grooves 308. If desired, the ribs 314 may be pressed from the bodies of the stampings 304 and 30S, although, as shown, separate ribs 314 are welded in place within the semi-circular grooves. The head SI2 is thus freely rotatable relative to the socket 300, but is not adjustable axially thereof.

The socket 352 is also formed of a pair of opposed channel members 32d and 322, which are provided with grooved portions 324, which define a sleeve which slidably receives the body 325 of the post associated with the head 328. The extreme end of the post 328 is, as before, provided with an annular rib or enlargement 33B, which is slidably and rotatably received in the enlarged cylindrical sleeve-like portion defined by the deeper grooved portions 332.

In this instance, the locking member 34@ is shown as being applied between the body of the cross bar and that one of the heads which is both rotatably and axially adjustable. The locking means may be similar to that described above and, consequently, has not been shown in detail.

It will ce noticed that with the construction of Fig. l5, the locking of the unit in a selected or rocked position does not interfere with the free adjustability of the length of the bar. This relationship is advantageous in many instances, since it enables the bar to be fitted' to various different car widths, and further enables the bar to automatically change in length to accommodate slight variations in car width which occur in transit. On the other hand, it is in certain instances advantageous to utilize the cross bars to give crosswise reinforcement to the car so as to prevent changes in car width which would normally tend to occur in transit or during shunting operations. In such cases, the construction of Figs. 20 through 24 is particularly advantageous, since when the bar has once been located at a desired point along the car and has also been rocked to the desired degree, the locking action xes not only the rocked position, but also the length of the bar, and enables it to reinforce the car, as aforesaid. It will be appreciated that this locking feature may also he utilized to advantage in constructions which, while having the feature of adjustability as to length, do not necessarily embody the rockable feature.

It will be appreciated that the above described rotatable features may also be embodied in the special types of bars shown in Fig. 2, in which figure the bar 38' is provided along its length with the teeth El! in the manner described in connection with the bars 39.

Before proceeding to a summary of the operating characteristics of the herein disclosed embodiment of the invention, attention is directed to the wedging tool shown in Figs. 24 and 25, and' which may be conveniently used to advance the cross bars along their associated supporting members, such as the wall members 34, so as to enable the wedging of the freight articles in place.

Referring particularly to Figs. 25 and 26, the wedging or leverage tool shown in use in Fig. 25, and in more detail in Fig. 26, is designated as a whole by the numeral 350 and comprises a suitable handle 352 suitably secured into a short sleeve 354 which is secured, as by welding at 355, to the side or main frame plates 356. These relatively heavy stiff plates are rigidly spaced apart by these welds and by pin 358 which is secured into holes 350 in each plate and also serves as a pivot for the freely rotatable sliding roller sleeve 352. The forged steel jaw member 364 is generally U -shaped with opposing faces and with two opposedl sets of identical curved teeth 35S, which are just like and meshl with teeth tt. As will be seen, this one tool with its two opposed sets of teeth can be used on the right or left-hand sides of the car. The space between the two sets of teeth 326 corresponds to the thickness of upper or shorter leg of the angle 10 plus the thickness of rack 60, or the equivalent member. The member 366 is freely pivotally mounted in, and also secured between, plates 35S by pins 368 in holes acre-em The. manner. of, .usinglthe wedging ytool?. 3.50.'. is-fshowninFig. 25.... Inthisyievv,acrossbar361s., supported. at, .its .left-hand., endupon a previously describedwallmember 34,. andit Will beunderstoodthat vthe .opposite endthereoi may be simi.-

larly, supported. One face ofthecrossbar 35 lies i against. thev face of. a .freight article. and it will beunderstood that. before .resorting to the Wedg- 'ing,.to0 1.*350 .the bar v36 may have been manually movedtoa. positioninwhich it freely abuts the freight article. With the partsthus.preliminarily positioned,.the. Wedgingtool 35-3. maybe applied tothe. Wall membenidbytting the jaw 334 thereof. overt-hev toothedv portionsoi' the Wall,

member 3G. Thisbrings one series of. teeth I into l meshing engagementwith the. teeth 5G. and..

-Wise direction, as. Viewedj in Fig. 25, which action causes the roller 362 to roll along the face of the bar 36 "from its initial pointv of 'engagement toa point nearer the end thereof.. During andby.

virtue of'fthisv movement, the bar36'is forced' toward the freight article m1 causing a takeup of" any space between it' and adjacent articles, or

betWeeILit and the end of the car or an associated'r bulkhead; If one such advancing movement of.'

the handleisnotsuiiicient to. taire .up alliof 'the' space, it Willbe appreciated. that the tool may be. removed and re-applied to.. the Wallqiriernber.-r 34 in. most cases the. useriwillflned it convenient. to Yretain they toolin.

at a point furthertherealong.

its Wedgingposition until after the lockingmember |50, associated with the bar 35,' hasbeen turnedA into the locking` position by rotating the nutQHZ.

kIt Willbeappreciated .that the. particular materials.of construction, dimensions,..weights and other. factors .pertinent tothe design of the indi'- vidual elements ofthe above-,described arrangementare determined by and. maybe varied in. accordance with'. the particular requirements.. of

the installationw in which v.they are, to be. used.

IllustrativeA such; proportionin'gs are. described inthe parent' application.

'BywayV ofasgeneral description of', thelincde;v

of' operation offthe arrangement, it*WillJoe-recogf nizedpthat inA Fig. laseries cf"crated ar.ticlesv dare stacked 1 onek YuponV the other in; the space adjacent one endofthe car and these articlesv are held in place by a series'ofvertically spacedv barsvv 36,` bearing the additional referenceA char.-

acter, e, andthe ends whereof'fare supported.'

uponA corresponding 1 Wall members; 3ft. l These bars 36 thusaord theequiva'lent of;a bulkhead.'v Next' to theV to-secure the articles dini place. bulkhead thus provided, arrow lof freight articles f` is` arranged, which mayl be of the type not suited to -bestacked directly oneupOn; the other. In this case, the top articles `f aresupported up.-

ontal decky deiined by` aN pair: oigcrossbars.. 36,.

Which bearfthe additional reference character. g, The intermediatey articles j are'similarly sup;-

ported by aHdeck denedrbyxthe cross. members 36, having the additional; reference character and-'theb'ottom1rovv of-such1 articles irests..on,'- theirloorfas'fwiilbe'understoodfi `As shown; bulk iswedgingly engagedfby'the cross ,bar having.. the mainrreferencecharacter 36 and the supple.- i

headfsupportrsfor theffbcttonrl.A and.the...interinadiate,articlesfl is; afforded-by the cross barst- 3.6,:- bearinglthe .additionalreference.. character, fand.. similar. bulkheading may beprovided, for. the.v

* upper tier-of. articles f.

In front of the.` freightarticles J-, a stackof.;y

articles -shownwhich are irregular shape@- andrnay be, for example,-rnetatgstampings or;

the-.1ike.: It is` assumed. in. theigure.that, the surfacesofythis. stack lc, Whichds adjacent. then bulkhead defined by/theg'cross bar. bearings.the;4 main. reference character 36 and.. the supplemental reference character. z', may; suitablyybef.

wedged..against-...suchi cross bar.: The: samefisf'y true Iof.. the lower frontv edge ofthe stackJc, .whichr mental reference character m: Asfshownahoweven. the upper .front.sur.face ofthev stackflc is tilted and this. tilted surface is--engagel bythe rotatablebar 33; which, as describedfabove; may=- barocked to any desired .positionso vas toaizeco1rxn1odate. they flat. face thereof to'v -thefreight.t surface engaged-` thereby.

In. usingthaarrangement,` as will be understood, a seriesofthe wall.members ..3 4.maybe. appliedin the previously describedmanner and at appropriate vertical. intervalsto .accommodate .i

ff the stackedfreight articles-d. These cross. bars 38 maybe readily and manually liftedltoapoint...

at which their respectiveendsfrest upon..the.as, sociated. Wall members,... With the. latches.- |50..

thereof inv the. retracted.. position. Thereafter., f: the bars may be manually pushed lengthwsefof;

the wall, members, so.. as to cause. .vthem..to,. abut the. facesof. the.freight.a rticles..d... Withcer-f y tain classesof, freightlarticlesfsufficient tightness,A mayu*Ice attainedgmanuallyv in vieiv cfg-the..

relative ,neness ofi 'the .adjustment aiorded. .by the. closely spaced',. relative1yx small..coacti'ng;l teeth .60 vand v132. In other..cases, itomaybede. sirable to use. the Wedging .tool -350..in, the pref viously desired' mannen. after. which. the latches..

u l5il may be turned. into the.,lo`cked..position'.

Similar comments apply to the application andi..

adjustment .of the remaining walllmernbers 34 and cross members Sein Fig.. ,1. VSimilarmcom:V ments Valso apply to` the. application ofthe.. ro:

tatable bar.36 1in Fig., 1, wth` the qualification.. 'that after.. this', bar hasbeerimoved.intoplaceV and the centralbody pDrtion, lill,'..thereofLrockedLL to. the desired position; ,itis preie'rred. V to. lock suchbody` portioniinthe' rocked position. v

VItwillbe appreciated .that similar commentez.` apply, topthe'.v erectionA of :partition bins.. or the like in the manner indicated,injig.l 2.

It' will beY noticed; also, that..,the. freely4 ad:

justable. lengths of.4 the severallcrossbars enable.

these barsioiaccommodate themselyesto varia :tions in. the.. widthof` the. can.L or.Y tavariationst ini. the spacing between.. other; memberswhich.. are` spannedl by these bars.. Variations `Vof;;-this.- sort are encountered for various 1easons;. For..

example', due to. errors in'. original construction-.f or to deformations...encountered. in..service, the

Widths. ofqcars are foundgto. varyy at... diferent.. pointsalong thelengthmfrthefcan Operating... stresses' also cause periodic variations in the cai:

dimensions. AlLsuch variationsare,readilyzcomr 'pensated for, and/ or reinforced.. against, .byi the:

present adjustable features.. v- Itwiil' be noticed that all of'the..-herein..il1us=- tratedlmembersare capable. of.i andirLmosacases .arci subjected i. toi; what.; may.;- be termeag. bearer-f loading as distinguished from axial or column loading. The construction of the individual members is advantageous in resisting beam loading, since the reinforcing members therefor, being flanged, strengthen them against both vertically and horizontally applied forces. In this connection, also, it will be appreciated that the relatively long telescopic connections are'of material advantage, since these connections `afford relatively long bearing surfaces along which the beam forces are distributed.

Although only several specific embodiments of the invention have been described in detail, it will be appreciated that various further modiflcations in the form, number and arrangement of the parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention;

What is claimed is:

l. As an article of manufacture, a freightholding bar having locking means at each end thereof to rigidly 'fix the ends in selected adjusted positions along side supports of a freight car, or the like, the major intermediate portion of said bar having substantially at freight-engaging faces, and said intermediate portion being axially rotatable between the end portions.

2. As an article of manufacture, a freightholding bar having a body adapted to engage freight and holding portions secured to the body and spaced from each other lengthwise of the body for cooperation with associated bar supporting means, said body being non-circular and rockable about its axis relative to said holding portions, said bar being constructed to sustain beam loading.

3. As an article of manufacture, a freightholding bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having a body adapted to engage freight and holding portions secured to the body and spaced from each other lengthwise of the body for cooperation with associated bar supporting means, said body being non-circular and rockable about its axis relative to said holding portions, and said holding portions including means enabling them to interlockingly engage said supporting means.

4. The structure of claim 2 wherein the said body portion is normally freely rockable and wherein means are provided to releasably hold the said body in selected rocked positions, said means being mounted on one of said portions and engaging the other of said portions.

5. The structure of claim 2 wherein the body is connected to the holding portions by telescopically related elements which permit such rocking.

6. As an article of manufacture, a freight-holding bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having a body portion adapted to engage freight and holding portions connected to the body portions at the ends thereof for cooperation with spaced bar supporting means with which the bar isj associated, at least certain of said connections including adjustable elements enabling the corresponding holding portion to move relative to the body portion so as to increase or decrease the spacing between the holding portions, and said connections enabling the body of the bar to rock about its axis relative to the holding portions.

'7. The structure'of claim 6 wherein` at least one of the connections is provided with holding means for releasably securing the body in selected rocked positions. y

8. The structure of claim 2 wherein the hold-` ing portions are provided with Ca plurality of tooth-like projections formed to have a non-rockable rack-like supporting engagement with corresponding projections on the supporting means.

9. The structure of claim 2 wherein the holding portions are provided with a plurality of tooth-like projections formed to have a racklike engagement with corresponding projections on the supporting means, and wherein releasable latch means are provided to latch the holding portions in selected positions of engagement with the supporting means.

10. In combination, a pair of spaced supporting members having holding elements distributed along their lengths, a freight-holding cross bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having a body adapted to engage freight and holding portions connected to the body and spaced lengthwise thereof, said holding portions being interlockingly engageable with said holding elements, said bar including means enabling the body to be rockable about its axis relative to the holding portions.

l1. In combination, a pair of spaced supporting members having holding elements distributed along their lengths, a freight-holding cross bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having a body adapted to engage freight and holding portions connected to the body and spaced lengthwise thereof, said holding portions being interlockingly engageable with said holding elements, said bar including means enabling the body to be roclrable about its axis relative to the holding portions, and enabling the spacing between the holding portions to be increased and/or decreased.

12. The combination, for use in a freight car or the like, of a pair of spaced supporting members having holding elements distributed along their lengths, a freight bracing cross bar constructed to sustain beam loading whereby to rmly hold or support freight against lateral or vertical displacements, said bar having a body, holding portions and means connecting the holding portions to the body so that they are spaced lengthwise thereof, said holding portions being interlockingly engageable with said holding elements, said connecting means including relatively rotatable parts enabling the body to be rocked about its axis relative to the holding portions.

13. The combination, for use in a freight car or the like, of a pair of spaced supporting members having holding elements distributed along their lengths, a freight bracing cross bar constructed to sustain beam loading whereby to firmly hold or support freight against lateral or vertical displacements, said bar having a body, holding portions and means connecting the holding portions to the body so that they are spaced lengthwise thereof, said holding portions being interlockingly engageable with said holding elements, said connecting means including relatively rotatable parts enabling the body to be rocked about its axis relative to the holding portions, and at least certain of said parts being relatively movable axially of the body so as to enable the spacing between the holding portions to be increased and/or decreased.

14. The combination, for use in a freight car or the like, of a pair of spaced supporting members having holding elements distributed along their lengths, a freight bracing cross bar constructed to sustain beam loading whereby to firmly hold or support freight against lateral or vertical displacements, said bar having a body, holding portions, means connecting the holding portions to the body'so that they are spacedAIV lengthwise thereof, said holding portions being interlockingly engageable with said holding. elements, at least certain: of said connecting means. including telescopically related elements freely slidable relative to each other lengthwise of the bar, said relative sliding enabling movement of the corresponding holding portion relativev to the body lengthwise thereof, said holding elementsy being a rack-like series of tooth-like projections and said holding portions each being. provided with a plurality of complemental projections which mesh with the rst mentioned projections, and are Vreadily meshed by reason of said freely slidable relation.

15. The combination, for use in a freight car or the like, of a pair of spaced supporting members having holding elements distributed along their lengths, a freight bracing cross` bar constructed to sustain beam loading whereby to firmly hold or support freight against lateralv or vertical displacements, said -barv Ahaving a` body, holding portions, means connecting the holding portions to the body so that theyare spaced lengthwise thereof, said holding portions being interlocking-ly engageable with said holding elements, at least certain of said connecting means including telescopically related elements freely slidable relative to each other lengthwise of the bar, said relative sliding enabling movement of the corresponding holding portion relative to the body lengthwise thereof, said holding elements being a rack-like series of tooth-like projections, said holding portions each being provided with a plurality of ooinplemental. projections which mesh with the rst mentioned projections, and latch means carried by the bar Vfor releasably securing the bar in selected positions of adjustment along the supporting. members.

16. The article set forth in claim 1 inwhich said bar also includes an intermediate axially telescopic portionrto permit limited extension or shortening thereof. v

17. As an article of manufacture, an elongated freight holding bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having holding portions spaced apart lengthwise of the bar for cooperation with associated bar supporting means, said holding portions adapting the bar for readily detachable connection to said supporting means, said bar further having a freight engaging face which is angularly adjustable about its longitudinal axis relative to said holding portions whereby said face can be differently inclined to the freight.

18. As an article of manufacture, an elongated freight holding bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having spaced apart and longitudinallyv adjustable holding portions for cooperation with associated bar supporting means, said holding portions adapting the bar for readily detachable connection to said supporting means, said bar further having a freight engaging face which is angularly adjustable about its longitudinal axis relative to said holding portions whereby said face can be differently inclined to the freight` 19. The structure of claim 18 wherein means are provided to lock the said face in selected angular positions relative to said one holding .portion while permitting said longitudinal adjustment.

20. As an article of manufacture, a freight holding bar having, in combination, holding portions which are spaced apart lengthwise of the bar for cooperation withV associated supporting 128 means, means extending along the length of the bar providing a row of spacedsecuring means for cooperation with associated loading elements, said means being angularly adjustable about the longitudinal axis of the bar relative to said holding portions.

21. The structure of claim 17 wherein the bar alsov includes means providing a rowof spaced securing means for cooperation with associated loading elements.

22. The structure of claim 2 wherein the holding portions are provided with a plurality of toothlike projections formed to have a rackke engagement with corresponding projections on the supporting means, said. projections extending in a direction which enables them to control movement. in a direction normal to the length of the bar, and wherein the holding portions are provided with additional means for interlocking with the supporting meansto control movement of the holding portions relative to the supporting means ina direction lengthwise of the bar.

23. As an article of manufacture, a freightholding bar adapted to engage freight and also adaptedY to rest on and be adjusted along and to be secured between two spaced rack members each. havingy a toothed upper surface an under surface, and a side. surface, said bar being constructed to sustain beam loading and comprising an elongated member, a metal member fixed tov each end thereof having a projecting portion With'a. plurality of teeth to mesh with the teeth of. said rack members,- a portion to engage over the side surface of said rack members to prevent longitudinal disengagement of said teeth, and a manually adjus.table,.movable portionv to engage the under surface of the corresponding said rack member to secure the corresponding teeth in meshed relation to said corresponding rack member.

2.4. As an article of manufacture, a freightholding cross bar having interengaging securing means adjacent eachendthereof for holding it in a desired adjusted position between and With its securing means interenga-ged with certain of a series of intertting holding means spaced along the opposite side walls of a freight car or the like, the upper or lower surfaces and the side surfaces of said bar being all adapted to engage freight so that the parois usable to form a holddown or platform or to form a bulkhead without tilting, turning or different mounting thereof, and said bar having a series of spaced holding means along its length between its end securing means to interengage with and to secure in desired adjusting positions therealong the corresponding interengaging securing means adjacent the ends of other bars to thus form in a freight car or the like, side by side bins, central, vertical partitions, horizontal partitions, platforms or holddowns secured between spaced cross bars across the oar, or other arrangements, said lastmentioned holding means being recessed inwardly from adjacent surfaces of the bar so as tonot interfere with the freight-engageability of said bar surfaces.

25. As an article of manufacture, an elongated freight-holding cross bar adapted to engage freight and to extend horizontally and to be secured in selected positions between spaced engaging means carried by the side walls of the freight car, said bar having a head adjacent each end thereof, at least one of said heads being mounted for free telescopic motion relative to.

and along the length of said bar, each of said heads comprising portions to interengage with selected said engaging means to prevent any substantial displacements of said heads relative to said side walls in directions transverse to the length of the bar and also comprising portions to interengage with said selected engaging means to prevent any substantial displacements of said heads relative to said side walls along the length of said bar, While free relative motion between said heads is permitted to accommodate weaving between said side walls in transit, each said head further comprising a latch to permit or prevent disengagement oi" said head from said engaging means.

26. The organization of claim 25 in which said portions to prevent transverse displacement of said heads relative to said side walls comprise laterally spaced portions to prevent tilting of said heads relative to said side walls.

27. The organization of claim 25 in which said latch comprises one of the portions to prevent transverse displacements of said head relative to said side walls.

28. The organization of claim 25 in which said bar comprises a straight, elongated intermediate body portion and in which each of said heads is mounted for free telescopic motion relative to and along the length of said intermediate body portion.

29. The organization of claim 25 in which said portions to prevent displacements of said heads relative to the side walls in directions along the length of the bar comprise spaced-apart upright surfaces to receive said engaging means therebetween.

30. The organization of claim 25 in which said bar comprises an intermediate body portion having opposite flat vertical freight-engaging sides. 31. As an article of manufacture, a freightbracing bar adapted to be secured in adjusted positions along and between horizontally extending rows of rack means carried by opposite side walls of a freight car to tightly engage and thus secure freight articles against motion in the car, said bar comprising, in combination, a freightengaging intermediate body portion and holding portions at each end thereof each having projecting means arranged to securingly engage selected rack means Hoy a moton of said freight-engaging body portion only in a vertical plane, and at least one of said holding portions being connected to said body portion by parts which are freely extensible and contractible axially of the bar to initially fit different widths or variations in freight car widths and permit weaving of the freight car walls in transit, whereby said bar can have its length suitably adjusted and its holding portions securingly engaged while its body portion is tightly pressed against an upright freight article.

32. The organization of claim 31 including nonremovably mounted latch means supported by said holding portions to selectively prevent said vertical motion of the body portion and the relative disengagement of said holding portions from said rack means.

33. As an article of manufacture, a freightholding bar constructed to sustain beam loading and having a body adapted to engage freight and holding portions for cooperation with associated bar supporting means, said body being non-circular and rockable about its axis relative to said holding portions, and said bar including adjustable elements enabling the spacing between said holding portions to be increased or decreased.

References enea in the me of uns patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 840,770 Ives Jan. 8, 1907 969,002 Teachout Aug. 30, 1910 1,702,169 Norman Feb. l2, 1929 1,891,588 Claus Dec. 20, 1932 2,056,704 Anderson Oct. 6, 1936 2,186,238 Deuel Jan. 9, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US840770 *Oct 12, 1906Jan 8, 1907Norman C IvesFruit-car bracer.
US969002 *Mar 14, 1910Aug 30, 1910William Ross TeachoutLoad-retaining attachment for freight-cars and the like.
US1702169 *Jul 20, 1927Feb 12, 1929Norman Sr Moses JChock beam
US1891588 *May 20, 1932Dec 20, 1932Frank ClausWindow safety device
US2056704 *Nov 8, 1934Oct 6, 1936Anderson Norman TCargo-merchandise bracing means
US2186238 *Aug 22, 1938Jan 9, 1940Deuel Edward WLading bracing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2806436 *Aug 17, 1956Sep 17, 1957Transp Specialties CoFreight positioning and retaining apparatuses
US2808788 *Nov 8, 1954Oct 8, 1957Whitehead & Kales CoSystem for the handling and transportation of parts, finished articles, or packaged goods
US2834304 *Sep 21, 1954May 13, 1958Evans Prod CoFreight loading apparatus
US2836131 *Nov 7, 1955May 27, 1958Evans Prod CoFreight loading apparatus
US2879721 *Nov 7, 1955Mar 31, 1959Evans Prod CoFreight loading apparatus
US2896554 *Mar 18, 1957Jul 28, 1959Transp Specialties CoFreight positioning and retaining apparatuses
US2919662 *Dec 28, 1956Jan 5, 1960Evans Prod CoCargo loading and storage apparatus
US2956517 *Oct 12, 1956Oct 18, 1960Evans Prod CoFreight shipping device
US2976824 *Aug 3, 1959Mar 28, 1961Transp Specialties CoFreight loading apparatuses
US3017841 *Dec 5, 1958Jan 23, 1962Atchison Topeka And Santa Fe REnd connection for the crossbars of a freight supporting and restraining system
US3066620 *Feb 9, 1956Dec 4, 1962David D WoodSupport member assembly
US3071086 *Aug 26, 1959Jan 1, 1963Evans Prod CoFreight bracing apparatus
US3114335 *Jun 24, 1958Dec 17, 1963Sparton CorpFreight bracing apparatus
US3130689 *Jun 10, 1959Apr 28, 1964Transco IncSub-cross bars
US3137248 *Nov 15, 1957Jun 16, 1964Sparton CorpCross member assembly
US3202111 *Jul 3, 1962Aug 24, 1965Evans Prod CoFreight bracing apparatus
US4236854 *Apr 18, 1978Dec 2, 1980Robert RogersPortable cargo brace
DE1076726B *Nov 29, 1955Mar 3, 1960Deutsche BundesbahnLadeausruestung fuer Transportfahrzeuge
DE1079093B *Nov 15, 1956Apr 7, 1960Deutsche BundesbahnLadeausruestung fuer Transportfahrzeuge
DE29708856U1 *May 20, 1997Sep 24, 1998Hamacher BurkhardAnordnung zur Sicherung von Ladung
EP2116417A1 *May 9, 2008Nov 11, 2009Schmitz Cargobull AGCargo box panel with two rails
Classifications
U.S. Classification410/150, 114/78
International ClassificationB61D45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D45/006
European ClassificationB61D45/00C