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Publication numberUS2679953 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1954
Filing dateJul 8, 1948
Priority dateJul 8, 1948
Publication numberUS 2679953 A, US 2679953A, US-A-2679953, US2679953 A, US2679953A
InventorsCrosby Field
Original AssigneeCrosby Field
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storage bin, including conveyer for moving stored products within the bin
US 2679953 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1, 1954 Q F|E| D 2,679,953

STORAGE BIN, INCLUDING CONVEYER FOR MOVING STORED PRODUCTS WITHIN THE BIN Filed July 8, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet l FIG. l.

' lNvEN-roR CROSBY F//s/.a BY .Bam ML M.

.ATTORNE 5 June I, 1954 C, |=|E| D 2,679,953

STORAGE BIN, INCLUDING CONVEYEIR FOR MOVING STORED PRODUCTS WITHIN TI-IE BIN Filed July 8, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2.

IIII

I I I I l Il I I I I L'EIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIII'."

24 FIG. 3.

ATTORNEYS June l, 1954 C, D

STORAGE BIN, INCLUDING OONVEYER FOR MOVING STORED PRODUCTS WITHIN THE BIN 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed July 8, 1948 -44a lNvENToR CROSBY F/ELD BY fmw; ATTORN YS FIG. 5f 7.4

C. FIELD June l, 1954 STORAGE BIN, INCLUDING CONVEYER FOR MOVING STORED PRODUCTS WITHIN THE BIN Filed July 8, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. 9.

INVENTOR CROSBY F/ELD ahw? fv/Afw( ATTORNEY FIG.

Patented June 1, 1954 STORAGE BIN, INCLUDING CONVEYER FOR MOVING STORED PRODUCTS WITHIN THE BIN Crosby Field, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Application July 8, 1948, Serial No. 37,710

14 claims. 1

This invention relates to storage bin constructions and more particularly to constructions wherein supplies of a dry, or relatively dry, product can be contained and preserved and from which the product can be withdrawn upon demand in carefully regulated amounts as desired. The present invention is an improvement, in certain respects, upon my previous invention described and claimed in Patent No. 2,222,024. The present improvement will be described in relation to a construction for storing particles of ice but, as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, it has general application to the storage and ultimate delivery of other products.

The invention of my above-mentioned patent has given excellent satisfaction in commercial practice. There are some instances, however, where a more precise and continuously even control of ice flow at the point of delivery from the bin is desirable. One object of the present invention is to provide a storage bin construction from which ice or other suitable product may be supplied in a continuously even ow. Another object is the provision of equipment for storing ice, or the like, wherein the ice may be accumulated and stored for an indefinite period of time and wherewith it is possible and efficient to demand and receive automatically either a small amount, a large amount, or some intermediate amount, as desired. A further object is to provide ice storing equipment which will overcome certain of the disadvantages inherent in the commercial and prior art constructions heretofore known. Other objects will be in part pointed out as the description proceeds and will in part become apparent therefrom,

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, methods of operation, and arrangements of parts as will be exemplified in the structure and sequences and groups of related steps to be hereinafter described and the scope of the application of which will be set forth in the accompanying claims.

In this specification and the accompanying drawings I have shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention and suggested various modifications thereof; but it is to be understood that these are not intended to be exhaustive nor limiting of the invention, but on the contrary are given for purposes of illustration in order that others skilled in the art may fully understand the invention and the principles thereof and the manner of applying it in various forms, each as may be best suited to the conditions of a particular use.

In the drawings.

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary storage bin construction embodying my invention with parts broken away and parts in section;

Figure 2 is a sectional plan View of the bin construction shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side elevation, taken along the section line 3 3 of Figure 2 in the direction of the arrows;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary view, on an enlarged scale, of a supporting frame and related members forming a part of the construction shown in Figure 1;

Figure 5 is a View similar to that of Figure 4 but showing a modified form of supporting frame assembly;

Figure 6 is a sectional view, taken along the line 6-6 of Figure 4 in the direction of the arrows;

Figure 7 is a sectional view, taken along the line l-l of Figure 5;

Figure 8 is an exploded perspective view of an assembly including a part of an end gate, as will be described, over which ice particles are delivered when called for;

Figure 9 is a cross-sectional elevation taken through a fragmentary portion of the end gate;

Figure l0 shows the parts illustrated in Figure 9 but in another relationship assumed under certain operating conditions; and

Figure 11 is a fragmentary elevational view, on an enlarged scale, of a power supply unit forming a part of the illustrative form.

In Figure 1, a storage bin construction is generally indicated at 2E) based upon a oor 22 and provided with side walls 24 and end walls 26. In the embodiment shown, the floor is of concrete and side walls 24 and end Walls 26 preferably are of self-supporting material having insulating properties. The bin is provided with an insulating ceiling 28 wherein supply openings may be included, as disclosed in my above-mentioned patent. The bin interior is fitted with an airtight lining 30 spaced from the side walls and from the door by appropriate framing to form, together with floor 22 and walls 24 and 2S, an enclosed space in which refrigerating coils 32 are disposed. Lining 30 preferably is of heat conductive material such as sheet metal so that the interior of the storage bin can efliciently be maintained at a temperature at which the ice particles will remain dry and hard.

Near each end of the storage bin `there is provided a partition (see Figure 2), identified on the left by the numeral 34 and indicated on the right by numeral 3G. Thus, as appears in Figure 2, the insulating compartment in which the ice particles are stored includes bottom 22, a pair of opposing side walls 24, and opposing end partitions 3-3 and 3%. Generally speaking, ice will be supplied for storage through an opening in the ceiling in a manner such, for one example, as disclosed in my aforementioned patent. Depending upon the rate'of the supply of ice to the storage compartment and the rate of withdrawal therefrom, the surface of the ice on hand may reach substantially tothe top or may be at a somewhat lower level. In.order" to'enable an automatic and even delivery of ice in such quantity as desired I provide a conveying arrangement now to be described.

Across the ice storage compartment; in a position such as to coincide with the surface of the ice, there extends a screw conveyor 3E* (see Figures l and 3) carried upon a conveyor sleeve 4G. Sleeve d is itself rotatably carried. upon a shaft; coaxially disposed. therewithin. Conveyorand sleeve. 4i! are caused to rotate upon shaft-742 by mechanism to be described hereinafter. It will be appreciated, however, that when the conveyor turns clockwise, as viewed in Figure l, ice in contact with thebladesV of the conveyor will be moved toward and pushed over the topgedgeof .partition 34.

So that ice will at all times be availablel in quantity to the conveyor blades, I provide for a sidewise component of movement for the conveyor asa whole, with .the result that as it'pushes ice over the end partition it slowly moves across the surface and top portion of the bulk of the iceinstorage, from one side'of the compartment to the other. In the illustrative form the conveyor always is parallel. to the sidewalls 2li and as it moves from one side wall to the other it removes a top layer of ice from the bulk in storage. and pushes it in an even, continuous supply into the space at the end of the compartmentV between partition 3d land adjacent wall 26 (see Figure 2). And, when a pass once across the; compartment hasbeen made, then, bymeans about to be described, the conveyor assumes a positionspaced somewhat below the level of the pass just completed and proceeds to make a return pass across the compartment, delivering ice at va `constant rate all the while.

Shaft 42 extends beyond each end of conveyor sleeve mandat each end extensionis fitted with a mangle wheel 44 and a roller le (see also Figures 4 and 6). In a planel generally parallel to end partition 34 (see Figures l and 2) there is provided a mangle rack 48 with which mangle wheel 44 cooperates and a track 50 on which roller 46 is supported. Rack 48 and track 50 follow a serpentine path (see Figure 4) and are carriedupon a pair of vertically disposed frame pieces 52.` As-shown in Figure 4mangle rack 48 incorporates a series of parallel pins which are bolted in iixed relationship adjacent to the path formed by track 50. A correspondingly similar rack` andtrack is provided adjacent partition 36 for supporting and guiding the other end of the conveyor assembly.

As rollers t5 roll upon track 5G, shaft.42 is maintained in a horizontal position extending across the ice compartment and moves in a series of traverses from one side edge thereof to the other.v Inso moving, screw conveyor 38 is caused to travel from one side ofthe-ice compartment to the other. The serpentine construction of track 50 is such that when. the rollers de have 7 reached one side of the ice compartment they execute a reverse turn through 180 (see Figure 4) and proceed downwardly and then horizontally again back across the lowered surface of the ice. As will be described hereinafter, the translatory movement of shaft 42 is eifected by a force of rotation applied to the shaft. This force reacts through mangle wheel i4 and mangle rack 48" to feed the conveyor sidewise and downwardly. The direction of rotation of the mangle wheel remains constant during ice feeding. Accordingly, at Ythe left end (see Figure 4) of' a horizontal pass or traverse across the ice the wheel pivotsrbeyond and around and below a single end pin of rack 48. At the right-hand end of 'the pass the wheel follows inside of the pins asv they delinea-te" a 180 arc tangentially joining thepath of the pass just completed with the pathpf'the pass next to be executed.

As an alternative to the mangle wheel-mangle rack embodiment above-described I have shown in Figures 5 and 7 a gear and rack construction for performing the same functions. Corresponding parts are identified by corresponding reference characters with the exception that to each reference character on the alternative form an a has been added.

From the foregoing it will be observed that as ice feeding proceeds the disposition of he conveyor assembly becomes progressively lower. In order to accommodate the end partitions 34 and 36 to this method of operation I have made the partitions collapsible as will now be described.

As shown in Figure 3, each end of sleeve 48'is carried in a bearing-construction 54 forming a part of a pedestal 56 and the pedestals 55 support a pair of rails (see Figure l) indicated at 58`. These rails are incorporated at each end into a translator/bearing assembly Gil resting upon the upper portion of a pedestal 5B. Bearing assemblies BD are disposed around and slidable upon a pair of translator beams 62, one of which is disposed at each end of the ice storage compartment above end partitions 34 and 3S respectively (see Figure 2). Each translator beam 62 serves as a top support from which depends a series of imbricate partition plates 54, 56, 68, l0 and 12, which series of plates together form at each vend of the ice storage compartment the partitions 34 and 36.

Figures l, 9` and l0 show how each partition plate is provided across its bottom portion with a liange T4. Plate E6 is suspended from plate. Gllby means of headed bolts, one of which appears at 'I6 in Figure 9, Ywhich pass downwardly through holes in the flange Ni fixed to plate 64,' and thence through aligned holes in the flange 'M forming a part of plate 68. The lower end of each bolt'l is provided with a nut 18. 'Similarly, plate E8 is suspended from plate 6B by headed'bolts 76 and nuts 'i3 extending fromthe flange T4 on the bottom of plate Si) to the nange ld on the ybottom of vplate 58. This construction is such that partitions 34, 3c formed by the imbricate plates are progressively collapsible, and one plate can move with respect to the next, as shown in Figure l0.

The uppermostplate is provided at each of its sides' withy an upwardly extending elongated guide shoe which is slidably positioned in a vertically disposed guide slot S2 formed in the adjacent side wall of the storage compartment (see Figure'8). Thus the guide shoe Si) at each endofplate 64 enables the plate to slide vupwardly and downwardly within slots 82 without any tendency toward jamming. Each guide shoe 8|) is provided with a pair of rollers 84 and 88 (see Figure 8). These rollers cooperate with a vertically extending rail S8 aligned adjacent to the guide slots 82. Thus, in addition to the guiding effect of shoes 88 in slots 82, the rollers 8'4 and 86 with the vertical rails 88 further facilitate free up and down movement of carrying plate 84. Each of the depending partition plates 86, 68, 10 and '|2 is provided, respectively, at each of its sides with a pair of upwardly projecting, elongated guide shoes 98, 92, 94 and 98. These shoes cooperate, respectively, with pairs of guide slots 98, |88, |82, |04 vertically disposed in the adjacent compartment side walls.

Plates B4 are thus enabled freely to move up and down in their vertical planes at each end of the ice compartment following the movements of translator beams 82. And as plates 64 so move the imbricate partition plates depending therefrom also freely move in their respective guide slots. As shown in Figure 3, a plate sump |83 is provided beneath partitions 34 and 3S so as to form spaces into which the plates may descend in making clearance for the conveyor as the conveyor proceeds to deliver ice from surface portions of the stored pile. It will be appreciated, of course, that the vertical position of plate 84 at any time depends upon the vertical position of translator beam S2 and, as illustrated in Figure l, the position of translator beam S2 depends upon the vertical location of bearing assembly lEll carried above the screw conveyor.

It is necessary to supply power to the conveyor assembly in order to perform the ice feeding previously described. One way of accomplishing this is as follows: As shown herein in Figure 1l, rails 58 extend beyond translator beam 82 to form a support for a power unit frame indicated at |88. Frame |88 carries a plate ||8 below which is suspended a reversible electric motor v| I2. Motor ||2 drives through a flexible coupling ||4 to a speed reducer H3. The output of speed reducer IIS is to a pulley ||8 and then through a double sprocket chain |28 to an intermediate pulley |22 along with an idler |24 maintaining the endless sprocket chain in driving tension. Pulley |22 is carried upon and drives an input jackshaft |28 which feeds into a second speed reducer |28. A pinion @|38 is carried upon input jackshaft I 28 and meshes with a conveyor gear |32 in driving relationship with the end of screw conveyor sleeve 48. Thus, power is transferred from motor l2 to the screw conveyor 38. The output of the second speed reducer |28 is to output jackshaft |34, upon which is carried a pinion |38 meshed with a conveyor shaft gear I 38 carried upon shaft 42. Thus power is transferred from motor ||2 to shaft 42 and then to mangle wheel 44 as described above.

In one form which the invention has taken motor ||2 is a three H. P. 1200 R. P. M. motor. The useful output of this motor is approximately 1160 R. P. M. The reduction effected by speed reducer ||8 is at a ratio of 4.14 to 1, so thatthe resulting output at pulley ||8 is approximately 281 R. P. M. The relationships among the sprocket chain and pulleys are such that the input to shaft |26 is approximately 154 R. P. M. and the speed of conveyor sleeve 48, and accordingly of conveyor 38, is approximately 31 R. P. M The reduction ratio of speed reducer |28 is approximately 40 to 1, so that with the added effect of gears |36 and |38, shaft 42 is caused to make somewhat less than one R. P. M.

The ice delivered over the edge of the plate 64 bythe screw conveyor falls into a sump (see Figure l) indicated at |48 in which is disposed a second screw conveyor |42. By using conventional electrical controls for the motors driving the two screw conveyors, the two conveyors are coordinated. In the majority of installations one of my storage bin constructions will be installed beneath one or more of the ice making machines of the type referred to in my abovementioned patent so that the ice product is continuously supplied to the top of the quantity of ice in the storage bin. Where my ice storage bin is associated with a continuously operating ice making machine, it is preferable that controls be incorporated in the motor circuits so that the screw conveyor, after a period of inactivity, will return to its uppermost position, and so that the end partitions 34 and 36 will be in their extended conditions. The inactive conveyor then will not be buried underneath a pile of freshly frozen ice particles and the capacity of the bin will be at a maximum. I have found in practice that a good balancing of results is attained if the controls for the motors are such that the screw conveyor remains in its position of last delivery for about 20 minutes of inactivity. If 20 minutes have passed and no demand has been made by the operator of the bin for delivery of ice particles, then the motor should be actuated in reverse so as to cause the conveyor to make its way upward. Thus ice coming into the machine from above will be retained by the raised end partitions and the conveyor itself will not be buried.

From the foregoing it will be seen that an ice storage bin construction made in accordance with the present invention is well adapted to attain the ends and objects hereinbefore set forth and to be economically manufactured since the several parts and assemblies are well suited to common production methods and are susceptible to a wide latitude of variations as may be desirable in adapting the invention to different applications.

As various embodiments may be made of the above invention and as changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A storage bin construction for storing a quantity of a product and for delivering upon demand a continuous supply of the product taken from upper portions of the stored quantity, said construction including: a vertically disposed collapsible partition forming a wall of the bin, a

horizontally disposed conveyor assembly extending from said partition and across the bin, a pair of conveyor supporting frames disposed one at each end of the conveyor assembly and each lying in a plane substantially normal to the axis of said conveyor' assembly, and a power unit coupled to said conveyor assembly; each frame comprising a conveyor track which defines a continuous path extending from a point near the top of the bin and proceeding downwardly thereof back and forth across said frame, and said conveyor assembly being supported at each of its ends byr said tracks.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said col- 'za-crasse i7 .-,lapsible gpartition fis -esuspended :from said conveyor assembly.

3..-A storage I.bin .construction :for storing a quantity 4,oral-product andfor --delivering upon zdemand azcontinuous'supply of :the product taken .fromnpper portions of the stored -quantity, said construction including: a'pairwof vertically disfposed collapsible -partitions `forming opposite walls of the bin, a horizontally disposed conveyor assemblyextending ,between said ypartitions and r.across the bin,1a pair of conveyor ysupporting .framesrdisposedf one.-at ,eachendy of the conveyor assembly and each '.lyingin a:V plane substantially `nor-mal toA ther-axis .of-:said conveyor, and a power 4,unit `coupled to sa-id conveyor assembly; ,each -frameLcomprising'a conveyor track which denes a.continuous1path Vextending from a point near `theztpp of .theebin :and proceeding downwardly ithereof Vbackandforth across said frame, and .said conveyor assembly being supported at each :ofits :ends by said tracks.

:4. .The inventionof claim SWherein: said col- .lapsiblewpartition:issuspended from said con- -veyor assembly.

5..A storage bin l construction for Vstoring a Yquantity `of alproduct and for delivering upon `demand a continuous supplyofthe product taken -fromrupperjportionsof the stored quantity, said construction including: a horizontally disposed conveyor assembly extending across the bin, a ro- `tatabledrive member .and a rotatable load-carrying .member'at each `end of the conveyor'assembly, fand a pair of .conveyor supporting frames .disposedfone-atf-eachzendof the conveyor assem- .bly and each lying in avplanelsubstantially normal .to theiaxisof said conveyor assembly; each frame .comprising a conveyonrackand track arrangement whichdenes -a continuous path extendingfroma point near thetop of said frame and proceeding downwardly thereof back and forth across said trama-said drive members being engaged with the rack-and said load-carrying members being-supportedby'thetrack of said rackl and l. track :arrangement Y6. -A storage bin construction for storing a quantity of a product and for delivering upon ,demanda continuous supply ofthe product taken from upper portionsoi the stored'quantity, said .constructioninclu-ding: a horizontally disposed conveyorshaft:extending. across the zbin, a screw conveyorrotatably carried upon said shaftintermediate of .the ends of said shaft, a rotatable drive member and a rotatable load-carrying member on each end of said conveyor shaft, apair of conveyor shaftesupportingframes disposed one at each end of the conveyorshaft and each lying in-aplane substantially normal tothe axis of said shaft, andapower unit carried upon said shaft; each framecomprising Va conveyor rack and track arrangementwhich defines a continuous path extendingfrom a point near the top of said frame and proceeding downwardly thereofrbackand forth across Ysaid frame, `said drive members beingengaged with the rack and said load-carrying members being supported by the track of said rack and track arrangement, and saidpower unit-incorporating a low speed drive to said shaft and a higher speed drive to said conveyor.

"1'. In a constructionof the character described, a frame, a load-supporting track for a rolling member mounted on the frame and defining a continuous'path comprising a series 'of substantially horizontal, Aparallelly-'disposed traverses acrossthe frame and` arcuate half-loops smoothly tially horizontal,

yjoining ,pairs of 7adjacent -.traverses, Ysaidrhalf Aloops being positioned ialternatelyone at one side ,of the traverses andthe next-.at the otheriside said track through its traverses and around .the

half loops onone side of said frame.

V9. In a storage bin construction for storinga quantity of aproduct'and for delivering lupondemand a .continuous supply'of the product taken from upper portions'of the stored quantity, the combination including: a horizontally disposed conveyor shaft moya-bly supported at eachrof .its ends, va bearing andv pedestal assembly positioned upon the shaft, said Ishaft being rotatable within the bearing andsaid-bearing supporting the pedestal, a frame'carried upon the pedestal and overlying the shaft, Aa translator bearing carried in the frame with its axis lyingv inea plane normal to the axis ofthe shaft, a translator beam disposed within the translator zbearing, said translator bearing being bodily movable along said translator beamfand a partition Yassembly suspendedrfrom` end portions of said vtranslator beam and extending crosswise belowsaid-shaft.

l0. The invention of claim 9 wherein saidpartition comprises a series of imbricate plates.

11. In a storage bin-construction forl storing a quantity of a product and :for'delivering .upon demand a continuous supply of the product taken from upper portions-of the stored quantity, `the combination including: a pair of tracks disposed opposite each .other one `at each `sideof said bin, a horizontally disposedconveyor shaft movably supportedat each of its ends upon said tracks, a bearing and pedestal.assemblyrpositioned upon the shaft, said shaft being rotatable within the bearing and-said bearing supporting the -.ped estal, a frame carried upon the .pedestal and overlying the shaft, a power unit mounted ,on saidframe,- and apower drive coupling said unit to said shaft and supplyingpower thereto.

Yl2..In a storage bin construction for-.storing a quantity of a product and for delivering-upon demand a continuous supply of the product taken from upper portions of the stored quantity,.the combination including: a-horizontally disposed conveyor shaft movably .supported at each. of; its ends, a bearing and pedestal assembly positioned upon the shaft, said shaftbeing rotatable within the bearing and said bearing supporting the pedestal, a frame carried uponthepedestal and overlying the shaft, a translator bearing carried in the frame with itsaxislyingin a plane normal to the axis of the shaft, a translator beam disposed within the translator bearing, said ranslator bearing being bodily movable along saidtranslator beam, a partition assembly suspended from end portions o1" said translator beam and extending crosswise below said shaft, a power unit mounted on said frame, and a power drive coupling-said unit to said shaftand supplying -power thereto.

13. In a storage bin construction for storing*` a quantity of a product and for delivering upon demanda continuous supply of the product taken from upper portions of the stored quantity, the

combination including: a pair of tracks disposed opposite each other one at each side of said bin,

a horizontally disposed conveyor shaft movablyf supportedat each of its ends upon said tracks, y

a screw 'conveyor rotatably disposed upon said shaft, a bearing and pedestal assembly positioned upon the shaft, said shaft being rotatable within the bearing 'and said bearing supporting the pedestal, -fa frame carried upon the pedestal and overlying the shaft, a power unit mounted on said frame, a first power drive coupling said unit to said shaft for supplying power thereto,

and a second power drive coupling said unit toV assemblies and said bearings supporting the pedestal, a frame carried upon the pedestals and overlying the shaft, a pair of translator bearings carried in the frame one at each end thereof with their axes lying in planes normal to the axis of the shaft, a pair of translator beams disposed one within each translator bearing, each translator bearing being bodily movable along its translatorl beam, and a pair of partition assemblies suspended from end portions of each translator beam and extending crosswise below said shaft and parallel to each other.

` References Cited in the le 0f this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 753,719 Logan Mar. 1, 1904 892,593 Keller July '1, 1908 894,618 Ferguson July 28, 1908 1,550,311 Foster Aug. 18, 1925 2,202,943 Boardman June 4, 1940 2,445,056 Cordis July 13, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 110,384 Germany Jan. 24, 1899

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2708023 *Mar 3, 1954May 10, 1955Walton W CushmanBearingless roller conveyor
US2970568 *Jan 30, 1959Feb 7, 1961Johnson Roy JVariable flow livestock feeder
US3511399 *May 14, 1968May 12, 1970Int Harvester CoForage feeder
US4168805 *Mar 31, 1978Sep 25, 1979Taylor Frank WStorage and ice dispensing system for ice in flake or particle form
US20030000154 *Jun 26, 2002Jan 2, 2003Sanna IgnazioTelescopic covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/333, 160/202, 222/252, 222/404, 160/222, 414/319, 49/94, 222/405, 198/578, 222/413
International ClassificationF25D25/04, F25D25/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D25/00, F25D25/04
European ClassificationF25D25/04, F25D25/00