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Publication numberUS2679963 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1954
Filing dateJul 10, 1947
Priority dateJul 10, 1947
Publication numberUS 2679963 A, US 2679963A, US-A-2679963, US2679963 A, US2679963A
InventorsNeal Morris P
Original AssigneeAbc Packaging Machine Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary table machine for packing bottles and the like
US 2679963 A
Abstract  available in
Images(11)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June l', 1954 M. P. NEAL 2,679,963

ROTARY TABLE MACHINE ROR PACKING BOTTLES AND THE LIKE Filedpuly 1o, 1947 v 11 .sheets-sheet 1 /NoexM/G 602 CYLINDER CONT/5 van 635 6 467 HTTU E/JEKS.

Jullie 1, 1954 "Ro-TARY'TABLE MACHINE FOR PACKING B TLESJAN 'THE LIKE Filed-July 1o, 1947 1 M. P. NEAL ROTARY TABLE MACHINE FOR PACKING BOTTLES AND THE LIKE Filed July 10, 194'/` 11 Sheets-Sheet 3 `Make/5 P, Mew/ J L Y; L' HrroR/VKS,

Julie 1, 1954 M. P. NEAL y 2,679,963

ROTARY TABL MACHINE FOR PACKING BOTTLES AND .THE vLIKE Filed July 10, 1947 11 Shets-sheet 5 30 TV5 /Z 382 777 l 1 405 /87 I `1| 406 407 l: I 1701 s' 370 364 l k371 qrro ENE Ks.

. 'ROTARY TABLE' MACHINE FOR PACKINGBOTTLES'AND THEYLIKEQ; v

v '/Nl/EN'TOP: MOP/Qms P. NEAL,

ATTO EMEKS.

Jil-ne 1, 1954 M, P NEAL 2,679,963

ROTARY TABLE MACHINE FOR PACKING BOTTLES AND THE LIKE /m/E/vro/e: MORE/s P. NEHL) June l, 1954 Filed Jiy 10, 1947 vM. P." NEAL v ROTARY TABLE MACHINE FOR PACKING BOTTLES lANO KE g2-,679,963

vvTHE LIKE 1.2L SheetvAS-Shet 9'v June l, 1.954

M.,P. NEAL. ROTARY TABLE MACHINE-FOR PACKING BOTTLES AND THE LIKE Filed July 10, 1947 1l Sheets-Sheet lO /A/ VEA/TOP: Mop/ws F. NEAL) Patented June 1, 1954 ROTARY TABLE MACHINE FOR PACKING BOTTLES AND THE LIKE Morris P. Neal, Quincy, Ill., assignor to A-B-C Packaging Machine Cor corporation of Illinois Application July 10, 1947, Serial No. 760,138

claims. 1

The present invention relates generally to packaging machines, and more particularly to a packaging machine which packs bottles, and other individual container units and articles, in inverted positions in cartons or other containers,

and to a method of packing bottles, and the like,v

in inverted positions in containers.

There has long existed, in the packaging machinery art, the need for a packaging machine which will commercially successfully load bottles, and the like, in inverted positions in cartons or other containers. It is highly advantageous to pack empty bottles neck down in containers, for then when emptied therefrom at the place of use all of the bottles are upright on the particular receiving surface and ready for the rst step of whatever process may be at hand. Bottle manufacturers have long sought after a packaging machine which will commercially thus package empty bottles neck down in containers, particularly one in which the loss due to bottle breakage in packaging is substantially eliminated.

Therefore, an object of the present invention is to p-rovide a novel packaging machine which incorporates the features long sought after in the art as essential in such a machine for packing bottles, and other articles, in inverted positions in containers.

Another object is to provide a novel method of packing bottles, and the like, in cartons and other containers in which the bottles, and the like, are disposed in inverted positions.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine which is particularly adapted to pack bottles neck down in cartons rapidly and with substantially no bottle breakage.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine particularly adapted for loading bottles in cartons in which a predetermined number of asesmbled bottles are covered by an upside-down carton and the grouped bottles and covering carton rotated through substantially one hundred and eighty degrees to dispose the bottles in upside-down position in a right-side-up carton.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine which packages bottles in upside-down positions in cartons which is fully automatic through each cycle.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine for loading bottles in upside-down positions in cartons which incorporates bottle grouping mechanism which automatically functions to group only a predetermined number of bottles.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging poration, Quincy, Ill., a

machine for loading bottles in upside-down positions in cartons which incorporates novel rotary table mechanism for receiving and for rotating a group of assembled bottles and a covering upside-down carton from one plane through one hundred and eighty degrees to a lower plane, which operation eects position reversal of bottles and carton, and, hence, upside-down loading of the bottles in the carton.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine for loading bottles in upside-down positions in cartons which incorporates novel discharge conveyor mechanism for receiving loaded Cartons and for automatically unloading received cartons onto the floor or onto an adjacent receiving device.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine incorporating a rotatable table mechanism for inverting bottles, and the like, in containers which includes novel indexing mecha.- nism for automatically indexing the table mechanism every one hundred and eighty degrees of rotation.

Another object is to provide a novel packaging machine which packs bottles into containers in inverted positions Without dropping them, thereby reducing to a minimum damage to the bottles and the containers and increasing the overall packing yield.

Other objects and advantages are to provide a novel packaging machine for loading bottles, or the like, in inverted positions in containers which is rugged in construction, thereby insuring long use with a minimum of maintenance, which packages at a rapid rate, which requires only a single attendant, and which is adapted to be operated by an attendant with maximum efficiency after only a little instruction.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages are apparent from the following description taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic plan view of a packaging machine constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention, shown in conjunction with a diagrammatically indicated empty carton conveyer and a bottle supplying conveyer (Sheet l);

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic side elevational View thereof, the associated bottle supply conveyer being omitted (Sheet l); l

Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic end view thereof, the associated bottle supply and empty carton con- Veyer being omitted (Sheet 1) Fig. 4 is a wiring diagram illustrating the wiring layout incorporated in a preferred embodiment of the present packaging machine (Sheet 1) Fig. 5 is a side elevational view of a packaging machine incorporating the concepts of the present invention, an associated inverted carton being shown 'm cross section to better illustrate details (Sheet 2);

Fig. 6 is a plan View thereof, the grouped bot tles on the transverse continuous belts and the covering carton being omitted, additional bottles being shown approaching the push-off positions (Sheet 3) Fig. 7 is a side elevational view thereof at 180 to Fig. 5, a portion of the bottle feeding conveyer and its support being broken away for conservation of space (Sheet 4) Fig. 8 is an enlarged end View of the free endk of the bottle feeding mechanism including the supporting head (Sheet 3.)

Fig. 9 is an enlarged verticaltransverse crosssectional View on substantially the line 9 9. ofv

Fig. 6 (Sheet 3) Fig. 10 is an enlarged vertical transverse crosssectional View on substantially the line iii-i0.

of Fig. 6 (Sheet 3);

Fig. 11 is a longitudinal vertical cross-sectional view on substantially the line Ii-ii of Fig. 8 (Sheet 4) Fig. 12 is a vertical transverse cross-.sectional view substantially' on the line i2-I2 of Fig. 5 (Sheet) Fig. 13 is a vertical longitudinal cross-sectional view taken on approximately the line 13-13 of Fig. 12 (Sheet 6);

Fig. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary plan View of' a central portion of the machine showing, in particular, in one extreme position of movement, details of the bottle limit switch construction, the pusher mechanism, the bottle guide mechanism, andrelated elements (Sheet 7) Fig. 14a is anA enlarged vertical longitudinal cross-sectional view through a switch arm shown in Fig. 14V (Sheet v'i' Fig. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary plan View similar to Fig. 14, showing the other position of movement of the several said mechanisms (Sheet 8);

Fig. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal view through half of the bottle receiving rotary table mechanism and the loaded carton receiving and discharge conveyer mechanism, a bottle loaded carton being illustrated as received by the latter mechanism from the former mecha nism, the loaded carton receiving and discharge conveyor mechanism being'shown in collapsed carton unloading position in broken lines (Sheet 9);

Fig. 17 isla fragmentary further enlarged plan view. of the. timer mechanism and a portion of the pnshermechanism (Sheet 6) Fig. 18 is a vertical cross-sectional View on the line IS-i of Fig. 17 (Sheet 6);

Fig. 19 is a vertical cross-sectional view on the line IB-IS of Fig. 17 (Sheet 6);

Fig. 2() is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view showing in greater detail a portion ofFig. 12, particularly illustrating therelationship of the clutch for the transverse continuous belts of the rotary table mechanism and the rack member for rotating the belts (Sheet 5);

Fig. 21 is a view of the clutch shown in Fig. 20, with the cover plate removed (Sheet 5);

Fig. 22 is a vertical cross-sectional view on the 4 line 22-22 of Fig. 20, showing details of the rack member adjustable stop (Sheet 5);

Fig. 23 is a further enlarged cross-sectional view on the line 23-23 of Fig. 20, showing details of the clutch, rack and pinion, and a portion of one of the continuous belts (Sheet 9);

Fig. .24 is an .enlarged side elevational view of the contact end .of the rack `member for actuating the transverse belts (Sheet 5) Fig. 25 is an end elevational view thereof (Sheet 5) Fig. 26is a planview of the loaded case-receiving conveyor (Sheet 5) Fig.. 27 is an enlarged plan View of one of the pivot arms which forms part of the loaded casereceiving and discharge conveyor mechanism (Sheet 9) Fig.Y 28 is an enlarged plan view, partly in section, of the conveyer lift casting (Sheet 4);

Fig. 29 is a side elevational viev.r thereof (Sheet 4).;

Fig. 30is an enlarged vertical transverse crosssectionalv'iew on the line 30--30 of Fig: 5 (Sheet tion, of the locating pin operating arm which:

forms part of the indexingmechanism (Sheet .10)

Fig. 35 is a plan view of the indexing ratchet wheel (Sheet 3) Fig. 36 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of the locating pin, an element offthein-Y dexing mechanism (Sheet .3)

Fig. 37' is a side elevational view thereof at 90 to Fig; 36 (Sheet 3) i Fig. 38 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal cross-sectional View through. a portion. of the switch bar and supported elements forming, part ofthe bottlelimit switch construction (Sheet 7) Fig. 39 is a plan view of the bottle stop (Sheet 7) 3 Fig. 40 is a side elevational View thereof (Sheet 7) Fig. 4.1Y is a fragmentary enlarged plan view of one end ofthe pusher plateand associated elements forming part of the pusher mechanism (Sheet 7);

Fig. 42 is a vertical cross-sectional View through a portion of the bottle guide mechanism taken on substantially the line 42-42 of Fig. 14 (Sheet '1);

Fig. 43 is an .isometric'view ofthe timer solenoid tripv device (Sheet l0) Fig. 44isapian. view, partly insection, ofthek Fig. 49 is a plan View of a ratchet wheel forming partei the indexing mechanism (Sheet 11) Fig. 50 is an edge elevational view thereof (Sheet 11);

Fig. 51 is a plan view of the timer ratchet wheel (Sheet 11);

Fig. 52 is an edge elevational view thereof (Sheet 11) Fig. 53 is an edge elevational view of the timer limit wheel (Sheet 1l) Fig. 54 is a plan view thereof (Sheet 11) Fig. 55 is a plan view of the timer ratchet stop pawl (Sheet 11);

Fig. 56 is a plan view of a mechanism which may be installed in the bottle feeding line for limiting the number of bottles supplied to the present case packer per unit of operating cycle (Sheet 8) Fig. 57 is a side elevational view thereof (Sheet 8);

Fig. 58 is a horizontal cross-sectional view on the line 58-58 of Fig. 57 (Sheet 8) and Fig. 59 is a vertical cross-sectional view on the line 59-59 of Fig. 57 (Sheet 8).

Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference numerals, 10 indicates generally a bottle, or the like, packaging machine, or case packer, constructed in accordance with the concepts of the present invention.

' Broadly, the present case packer 10 includes a frame 1|, bottle feeding mechanism 12 including a continuously running belt (Figs. 5 and 6), a pusher mechanism 13 (Figs. 14 and 15), bottle guide mechanism 14 (Figs. l2, 14, 15 and 42), bottle limit switch construction l5 (Figs. 13-15 and 38), a bottle stop 16 (Figs. 13-15, 39 and 40), a timer mechanism 11 for lirnting the number .of rows of bottles admitted for assembly as a group per cycle (Figs. 12 and 17 through 19), a rotary table mechanism 18 for receiving in a group a predetermined number of bottles, or the like, and for disposing the assembled group in a carton, or the like, in inverted positions (Figs. 5, 6, 15, 16, 23 and 44 through 47), an indexing mechanism 19 for rotating the table mechanism 18 through 180 at a predetermined point in the operation cycle (Figs. 5, 13, 30 through 34), a carton guide 80 (Figs. 5 and 16), and a loaded case receiving and discharge conveyer mechanism 8| (Figs. '7, l2, 13, 16 and 26'-29), together with coordinating elements, both mechanical and electrical. The several mechanisms, constructions and devices broadly set forth above are more particularly dee scribed in detail below.

The frame 1| includes a vertical front plate 85 and a rear vertical plate 05, which are securely connected together in opposed relation by two lower tie rods 81 and two upper tie rods 80 (Figs. 5, '1, 12 and 13). Bolts 89 and 90 extend through the plates 85 and 85 into internally threaded wells in the' ends of the tie rods 81 and 88, respectively. Each plate 85 and 86 includes vertical side flanges 9 I, a top flange 92 and a bottom iiange 93, which strengthen the plates and form supports for elements more particularly referred to below (Figs. 12 and 13). To the lower outer face of the frame plate 85 are welded or otherwise secured two spaced composite frames 94 on which are disposed boards 95 serving as a platform for an attendant.

The bottle feeding mechanism 12 includes a stand 96 comprising a base plate 91, reenforcing ns 98, a post 99, and a top plate |00 threadedly secured to the post 99, thereby permitting adjustment (Figs. 5, 6 and v8' through 13) Two short angle bars |03 are secured by bolt assemblies |04 to the top of the plate |00 in opposed relation.v A,

vertical plate |05 is secured against the outer face" of the upright ange of each angle bar |03, being anchored in place by the rear end of an elongated strap |06 abutting the lower edge thereof and bolts |01 which extend through the strap |06, the plate |05, and threadedly engage the vertical iiange of the angle bar |03. The strap |06 is welded at |08 to the upper face of the plate |00.A The forward end of each strap |06 is secured by` suitable bolts |09 to the upper end of a short.

and are secured together in adjusted position in respect thereto by nut and bolt assemblies |20 (Fig. 5). The sprocket ||6 has bearing support on a bushing |2| and is spaced centrally of ther interior small plates ||9 by spacer collars |22.

An adjustment nut |24 is mounted eccentrically' on each end of the shaft |1 outwardly of the outer small plate I9 and includes a threaded bore which receives the threaded end of an elongated bolt |26. Each bolt |20 also extends through an aperture provided in the outwardly extending .flange of an angle bracket |21 secured to the plate |05 by welding |28 (Fig. 5). It is manifest that the position of the idler sprocket H5 may be adjusted lengthwise of the bolts |20 by rotating the bolts' |'26`in the direction desired after loosening the nut and bolt assemblies |20. After the proper adjustment is secured, the

nut and bolt assemblies |20 are retightened to maintain the attained adjustment.

Extending through openings in the upper inner corners of the plates |05 for support is a shaft secured against removal by suitable nuts |3| (Figs. 5, 9 and 10). The outer ends of two elongated conveyor chain supporting members |32 are supported by the shaft |30 which extends through suitable openings in each. The members |32 are spaced from each other by a sleeve |33 and from the inner faces of the plates |05 by collars |34. A link plate conveyer chain |35 rests on the supporting members |32, as is clear from Figs. 5 and 10, and travels around the idler sprocket IIB, the teeth of which engage transverse lugs |31 of the links of the chain |35. The other ends of the supporting members |32 are supported by a suitable supporting arm which extends inwardly from the top flange 92 of the frame plate 86 (Fig. 13). The other end of the chain |38 engages a driven sprocket |42 keyed to a shaft |43 rotatively mounted on a suitable bracket |44 secured by bolts |45 to the inner face of the frame plate 8 Power for the power driven sprocket |42 is provided in the form of an electric motor |41 (Fig. '7), mounted on a plate |48 secured by suitable bolts |49 to the outer face of the frame plate 85. To the rotor shaft of the motor |41 is secured a pulley |50, about which is trained an endless drive belt |5|, the belt |5| also being transmission |54 bya shaft |55 to which is seage-vegeta 7. cured' a largesprocket' |5.6 (Figs: 7 andl1-22). Ay continuous chain |51.. engages the sprocket |56 andV .a smaller sprocket 581- secured to` the shaft- NB.. The transmission |54A` includes' the usual adjustment device for'varyi'ng. its output" in order to` regulate' the travel speed' of the. chain |36 as desired. It is to be observed that the return segment of the chain |36 travels between the spacedistraps |66- which. form a guard therefor'.

Spaced bottle. guide straps |52 are secured to the upper ends of small plates |63 mounted in uptight position onf` the supporting members |32, suitable bolts |64 being used for. both securing purposes.:A A. bottlel actuated switch |65 is securedto one. of the guide straps |62 (Figs. 5 and 6)-, .and includes a` pivotally -mounted actuating arm |i6`6 which extends into the path of bottles traveling on the bottle conveyer chain |36. The switch. |ii may be-of any make-and-break type,

the.contacts` being separated to break the circuit therethrough when the arm It is' in the position shown in Fig. 6. The electrical hook-up of theV switch |65 and the motor |41 is more particularly considered below in connection with the description of Fig. 4 andv of the over-all operation of the machine 1G.

For .moving bottles |18', or the like, from the bottle conveyor chain |36 as a predetermined number thereof, six in the present machine 1t selected as-illustrative reach predetermined positions in respect to the rotatively mounted table mechanism. 18', theV pusher mechanism 13, above mentioned in thev general description, is provided (Figs 6, '1, 12 through 15, 17 and 41). Supporting the' pusher mechanism 13' are two spaced brackets |1'|, which may be of the orm shown in Figs. 7 and 12 and whichv are secured to the outer face of the frame plate 35l by' suitable bolts |12-, The' brackets |1-| extend' upwardly from the upper edge ofthe' frame plate 86, and each includes a" horizontal flange |13' to which is anchored a plate' |14. by suitable bolts |15.

Two pairs of spaced bearing brackets |11 are secured to the' plate |14` by suitable bolts |18. One pair of'bearing brackets' |11 slidably receives a pusher shaft |19, and-the other pair of brackets |11 slidably receives a' pusher shaft Hit. To the forward end-of each' of the pusher shafts. |19 and |85) issecured a pusher shaft' bracket |583. (Figs. 14, 15 and 17) which. supports a bottle pusher plate |84 through suitable bolts |85, a pusher attachment bar It'cV being disposed' between the brackets |83 and the pusher plate |84. A bottle guiding strip |81 is securedV to the top of the attachment strip' |86 by' screws' |88 and extends forwardly therefrom. At its bottle receiving' end, the pusher plate |84 includes a right angularly rearwardly directedA flange |39 (Fig. 15') which-.prevents bottles |15' from moving behind the pusher plate |94 during the brief time' it is in its forward position.

Power means for reciprocating the pusher shafts |19 and |89, together'with their supported pusher plate |84', includes a solenoid operated air motor |9| mounted on and anchored to the plate |14 by suitable nut and bolt assemblies, or the like', between the pusher shafts |19v and |il. The air motor |9| is of any standard commercial construction, including a solenoid |29 for opening its air valve, usually spring actuated to reverse the air, and, therefore, detailed description thereof is omitted as unnecessary. The air motor*y |9| includes a reciprocating rod |92, to the free end' of which isv secured a bracket |93 (Fig.

15)... TheV bracket |93- is secured .by bolts; or the like, to the pusher attachment bar |286 midwaybetweenY the brackets |83. The electrical connections to the solenoid for energizationf and deenergization thereof are more particularly described below in conjunction with the description of Fig. 4.

The bottle stop 16 is mounted on the pusher. mechanism 13 for reciprocationY therewith. (Figs. 13 through 15, 39 and 40). As is clear fromFigs. 39 and 40, the bottle stop 16 includes a central bearing sleeve to` whichare welded, or otherwise fixed, angularly disposed arms |96 and |91..

The freev end of the arm |96 `is bifurcated and rotatably receives a roller |88? mountedy on. a

rivet |99, or the like. The arm |91 may be a strap member and is formed with an arcuate free end portion 2m?, the radius of which may besubstantially that of the commercial shortA beer bottle. The bottle stop 15 is pivotally mounted' between two-strap members 2t! secured as.' by welding to an extension at one edge of the pusher plate l', as is clear from Figs. 13 and 15,r the bearing sleeve |95 being received on a suitable shaft having secured support in the strap members 28|. The rollei` ISS tracks along the vertical anges of two angularly disposed angle members 29a and' 2cd secured by suitable screws, or the lik-e, to the bottom face of the plate` |15, being biased into constant eng-agement therewith. by a tension spring 2556, one end of' which is connected to the arm |93 and the other end to theextension of the pusher plate |94.. It is manifest that the bottle stop 16 moves from its bottle' stopping position, as is shown in `l'ig. 14, to its inoperative position, as is shown in Fig. l5, through tracking of the angle members 2%1- andl 255 by the roller ISS under the influence of the spring EGE as the pusher plate ili is moved for-` wardly.

At the other side of the. pusher mechanism 13' remote irom the bottle stop 1E is thetirner mech.- anism 11k for limiting through a mechanica-l. count the number of rows of bottles assembled on the table mechanism 18 (Figs. l2, 14 and 17 through 19). The timer mechanism 11` is supported on the plate |14'and includes an upstanding bracket 2id or the form shown secured to the plate |14y by suitable bolts extending through a horizontal base ange 2|! thereof. Welded or otherwise secured to anupper edge or the bracket- 2li? is a horizontal solenoid plate 2|2 which supports a timer reset solenoid 2|S- of conventional plunger typel secured thereto by suitable screws 214, or the like. The solenoid Zie" includes a plunger 2|5', to the free outer end of which is pivotally' connected at 216 a link 2|'1'.- To the other end' of the link 211 at 2|8 is pivotally connected a ratchet stop pawl 229. The ratchet stop pawl 226 is pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on the bracket 21B by means of a pivot post 22|. At its free end, the pawl 22S is formed as a hook 222 for engagement with certain teeth 223 o a ratchet wheel 224 (Figs. 51 and 52) secured as by setscrews to a shaft 225 rotatably mounted in a bushing supported by the bracket 2|. A tension spring 228 anchored to the bracket 2| il at one. end and to the pawl 22R at the other end biases the pawl 22|! into engagement with the ratchet wheel 224, as isv clear from Fig. 18.

A timer ratchet pawl. 238, in the formof an elongated` strap, is pivotally mounted at. one endon a bolt 23| supported by lthe reduced-end of the pusher shaft |80, the pawl 23B being spaced .and rotatively supports a small roller 242.

guide member 23h of spool configuration, which A is mounted on the plate 2|6 for support. A leaf spring 235 secured to the solenoid plate 2|2 by a suitable screw 23?, or the like, biases the pawl 230 into engagement with the guide member 235. Forwardly of the guide member 235, the pawl 23x) includes a hook portion 233, which is adapted to engage certain teeth of the ratchet wheel 224. It is to be noted that the thickness of the ratchet wheel 224 is suflicient to accommodate both the ratchet stop pawl 226 and the timer ratchet pawl 236. It is clear that, every time the pusher mechanism '13 completes a cycle, the ratchet pawl 236 reciprocates, and, through its hook portion 239, rotates the ratchet wheel 224 a distance of one tooth, the stop pawl 226 ypreventing return rotation of the ratchet wheel 224 while the ratchet pawl 233 is reciprocating.

Below the solenoid 2|3 and supported on the outer face of the bracket 2|6 is a limit switch 246 of standard construction which includes a moving switch blade and two stationary contacts. There is provided a plunger 24| for actuating the switch 246, the free end of which is bifurcatd e plunger 24| is spring biased into its extended position, as is shown in Fig. 19. For pushing the plunger 24| inwardly, there is provided a timer limit wheel 244, which is secured to the shaft 225 by suitable setscrews 245, or the like. As is clear from Figs. 53 and 54, the limit wheel 244 includes a linger 246 extending from the periphery thereof slightly off a radius which may be integral with or secured to the wheel 244 by welding. As is clear from Figs. 17 and i9, the finger 246 engages the roller 242 for inward movement of the plunger 24| as the fourth tooth of the ratchet wheel 224 is brought into the position occupied by the rst tooth thereof in Figs. 18 and 19. Hence, four rows of bottles |73I may be pushed onto the rotary table mechanism 18 by the pusher mechanism 'I3 before the limit switch 246 is actuated. Extending outwardly from one face of the wheel 244 is a lug 247 which is adapted to strike an adjustment screw 248 threadedly mounted in a threaded aperture of a lug 249 welded or otherwise secured to the bracket 2id and extending outwardly from the outer face thereof. The lug 24'! and the adjustment screw 248 limit counterclockwise movement of the wheel 244, as viewed in Fig. 19, and, hence, of the ratchet wheel 224.

Near its free end, the stop pawl 226 carries a lift pin 23| which extends beneath the ratchet pawl 236, as is clear from Figs. 17 and 18. Hence, when the solenoid "2!3 is energized to draw its plunger 2|5 inwardly or to the right, as in Figs. 18 and 19, the stop pawl 226 is pivoted clockwise to release its hook portion 222 from engaging relation with the teeth of the ratchet wheel 224, the lift pin 25| functioning during this pivotal action of the stop 236 from engagement with the ratchet wheel 224. With both the stop pawl 226 and the ratchetpawl 239 released from engagement with the ratchet wheel 221i, the ratchet wheel 224 returns to the starting position shown in Figs. 18 and 19 under the inuence of a suitable spring (not shown), the lug 247 and adjustment screw 248 cooperating to limit the counterclockwise return movement of the ratchet wheel 224.

For energizing and deenergizing the solenoid pawl 226 to lift the ratchet pawl "2|3 in timed relation with the indexing of the rotary table mechanism 76, there is provided a simple push type on-and-off switch 262 secured to and beneath the conveyer chain supporting member |32 adjacent the forward side of the rotary table mechanism it, viewing Fig. 12. The switch 252 includes a plunger 263 carrying at its end a roller 254 which in indexed position of the rotary table mechanism 'i8 is disposed between two trip plates 225 of a trip device 256 secured to an outside plate (more particularly referred to by reference numeral below) of the rotary table mechanism 'i3 through suitable screws 251 (Fig. 43). There is a trip device 256 secured to each of theY two end plates of the rotary table mechanism i8. succinctly, as the rotary table mechanism i8 begins its rotary movement, the roller 254 mounts the trip plate 256 moving past, thereby forcing the plunger 253 inwardly to close the switch 252 and energize the solenoid 2|3. The solenoid 2|3 remains energized and effective until the roller 254 is tripped a second time by the passing trip plate 255 of the trip device 256 on the other outside plate of the rotary table mechanism I8 just prior to indexing of the mechanism '18, which deenergizes the solenoid 213. The electric circuits including the solenoid 2 3, the switch 246 and the switch 252 are particularly set forth below in the description of Fig. 4.

The bottle guide mechanism 'I4 is provided for insuring an upright position of the bottles |10 as they are moved into position for action of the pusher mechanism i3 (Figs. 12, 14, 15 and 42). The bottle guide mechanism 'i4 includes a shaft 266 which is pivotally mounted at one end in the vertical iiange of a bracket 26| and at the other end in a bushing supported in the upper end of the timer bracket 2|6. At each end of the shaft 263 is an adjustment block 262 which slidably receives the free ends of a U-shaped bottle guide member 263. Suitable setscrews 264 provide for adjustment of the guide member 263 in respect to the adjustment blocks 262. As is clear from Figs. 12 and 14, the bight portion of the guide member 263 is bent downwardly in respect to the main portion of the legs in order to engage the bottles |76 near the tops thereof. The particular form of the guide member 263 shown permits the bottles |79 to pass freely by /the leg member thereof.

Adjustably secured to the shaft 263 intermediate the ends thereof are two spaced trip members 266, each having a trip finger 26T (Figs. 14 and 42). setscrews 263, or the like, maintain the trip members 266 in selected positions on the shaft 260. Associated with each linger 26'! is a pusher shaft 269 mounted for guided reciprocative movement in a guide sleeve 2li) secured to the air motor |3| for support. The end of each of the pusher shafts 269 remote from the fingers 267 is secured to a bracket 27|, which is in turn secured to the plunger of the solenoid |96 of the air motor |9l. It is clear that movement of the plunger of the solenoid |96 from the position of Fig. 14 to the position of Fig. 15 effects lifting of the guide member 263 from engagement with the hotties |10 through sliding movement of the pusher members 269 and rotation of the shaft 260 caused by engagement of the free ends of the pusher members 269 with the fingers 267 of the trip members 266. Since the solenoid |96 actuates the air motor ISE, the guide member 263 will be lifted prior to pushing action of the pusher mechanism 73, and will be returned to bottle "acvaec l1 guiding position upon return of the plunger of the solenoid |90 to starting position.

The bottle limit switch construction 15 is provided for initiating operation of the pusher mechanism 13 and related mechanisms, more particularly described below, after a predetermined number of bottles has been moved to position for transverse travel from the chain |36 to the rotary table mechanism 18 (Figs. i3 through 15 and 38) The limit switch construction 15 includes an elongated switch bar 215 having six spaced openings 216 therethrough (Fig. 38). Mounted adjacent each opening 216 between upper and lower spaced integral flanges 211 is a make-and-break switch 2.10 of the plunger actuated type, each switch 218 being secured in place by a strap 219 fastened by screws 280 to the flanges 211. Each switch 218 includes terminal strips 282 extending from each end thereof and a plunger 283 for making and breaking the circuit through the terminal strips 282. Connecting the adjacent terminal strips 282 are conductor strips 284 mounted on insulation blocks 285 secured to the switch bar 215 by screws 236. The conductor strip 284 associated with each of the outer switches 218 is connected to a terminal post 231 for connecting the switches 218 into an operating circuit more particularly referred to below in conjunction with the description of Fig. 4.

A iinger member 290 is pivotally mounted on a pin 29| supported in and spanning each of the openings 216. Each nger 290 includes a cam 292 which cooperates with the plunger 283 of its respective adjacent switch 213 to force the same inwardly upon movement of the finger 230 clockwise as viewed in Fig. 38.` A block 234 is secured to the bar 215 adjacent each opening 216 by a suitable screw 295. An adjustment screw assembly 296 is threadedly mounted in each block 294. A tension spring 291 has one end secured to the block 294 and the other end to the finger 299, thereby biasing the nger 290 into engagement with the free end of the adjustment screw 296. Manifestly, the rest positions of the ngers 290 are determined by the positions of the adjustment screws 296, each of which may be readily independently adjusted as desired. The switch 4bar 215 with its aforesaid elements is supported by two spaced brackets 298 (Fig. 14), the foot of each of which is secured to the plate |14.

It is to be understood that the circuit between the terminal strips 282 of each switch 218 is open when the plunger 283 is extended, as shown in Fig. 38, and is closed when the plunger 283 is forced inwardly by the cam 292 of the respective finger 290. The switches 218 are in series and, therefore, all six switches 218 must be closed` for current to flow between the terminals 281. In the circuit of the six switches 21S is a switch 300 of the two xed contacts and movable switch blade type, from which extends a rotatable operating arm 30| (Figs. 14, 14a, and l5). The arm 30| projects into the path of a trip finger 302 forming part of a trip member 303 adjustably secured to the pusher shaft |19. The arm 30| is hollow and includes a spring extended plunger 304 beveled at 304 to permit the trip finger 302 to pass the plunger 304 on the return movement of the pusher mechanism 13 by camming the plunger 304 inwardly. The switch blade of the switch 300 normally engages the Xed contact in series with the switches 218, the arm 30| being in the position shown in Fig. 15. When the arm 30| is rotated clockwise by the trip finger 302,

i2 the circuit of switches y218A is broken and a holding circuit is completed which remains effective until the arm 30| returns under spring action to its normal position. The circuits of the switch 300 are set forth below in the description of Fig. 4.

The rotatably mounted table mechanism 18 is disposed in relation to the pusher mechanism 1-3 and the chain |36 for receiving rows of bottles from the chain |36; in the present disclosure, four rows of six bottles each comprising a case load (Figs. 5, 6, 14 through 16, 23 and 44 through 47). A heavy shaft 305 is pivotally mounted in suitable bearings formed integral with or supported in the frame plates and 86 (Fig. 33). A table casting 306 of the form clearly shown in Figs. 44 through 46 is mounted on the shaft 305 for rotation therewith. The casting 306 includes a central body portion 301 having an opening 303 therethrough for mounting on the shaft 385. Threaded apertures 309 are provided for the reception of suitable setscrews for preventing longitudinal movement of the casting 306 along the shaft 305. A keyway 3|0 is also provided which receives a key 3|| (Fig. 16) for securing the casting 306 to the shaft 305 for rotation therewith. The casting 306 is symmetrical about a longitudinal center line and includes three arms 3|4 extending outwardly from each side thereof. Spaced bifurcated posts 315 extend upwardly from the arms 3|4 and from the body portion 301 to define six upper and lower passageways 3|6, viewing Fig. 45. An outside plate 3|1 (Figs. 14 and 48) is secured to each end of the casting 30S by suitable bolts 318 (Fig. 12), which extend through openings 3|9 in each plate 3|1 and into suitable threaded wells 320 in the ends of each of the arms 3|4 of the casting 306. An intermediate plate 32| (Fig. 47) is mounted in the bifurcations of each aligned set of three posts 3|5 (Fig. 14), being secured to a plate 322 at the rear edge thereof by welding, or the like, the plate 322 being secured to the plates 3|1 by welding or the like.

Each plate 3|1 includes two spaced openings 325 (Fig. 48), each opening 325 of each plate 3|1 receiving a bearing member 326 (Fig. 23) secured in place by suitable screws 321. Each bearing member 326 has a bushing 328. Rotatably mounted in aligned pairs of bushings 328 is a shaft 330. It is to be observed that the two shafts 330 are disposed transversely of the shaft 305 and equi-distant therefrom. At one end of each of the shafts 330 is an overrunning clutch 332 (Figs. 20, 21 and 23), which may be of any type allowing counterclockwise movement as viewed in Fig. 20. The clutch 332 illustrated includes a casing 333 freely rotatably mounted on a bushing 334 disposed about the shaft 330. Interiorly of the casing 333 and relatively rotatable in respect thereto is a clutch member 335 of the form shown in Fig. 21, including inclined surfaces 336 and shoulders 331. Roller bearings 338 are provided which are disposed between retaining'rin'gs 338. A closure plate 340 is secured to the casing 333 by suitable screws 34|. The clutch member 335 is keyed to the shaft 330 by a suitable key 342 disposed in keyways 343 and 344 provided in the shaft 330 and the clutch member 335, respectively. A pinion 341 is secured to the neck portion of the casing 333 by a suitable key 348 for rotation therewith. A rack member 350 engages the pinion 341 through teeth 35| for movement thereof. It is clear that counterclockwise movement of the pinion 341 (con- .mediate plates 321 shafts 366 which have bearing support in the two nspaced openings 361 in the outside plates 311 and plane below.

13 .sidering Figs. 20 and 21) will effecty counterclockwise movement of the shaft 330 since the pinion 341 is keyed to the casing 333, and the clutch 332, of which the casing 333 is a part, will effect positive counterclockwise movement of the lshaft 330 through the elements aforesaid. Free Vmovement to the right of the rack 351) is permitted by the clutch 332.

Six rollers 355 are secured to each shaft 336 .by suitable setscrews 356 (Fig. 23), there being a roller disposed between each pair of intermediate plates 32| and between each outside plate V311 and the opposite intermediate plate 321 (Fig. 6). The outside plates 311 and the intersupport vertically spaced the openings 362 in the intermediate plates 321 (Figs. 14, 47 and 48). Each shaft 366 supports for free rotation six sm ill rollers 363, there being one opposite each roller. 355. A flexible continuous or endless belt 364 is trained about each `pair of opposed rollers 355 and 363. There are,

therefore, six belts 364 in a horizontal plane above the main shaft 3135, and six in a horizontal A plurality of belt supporting .shafts 366 are supported in openings 361 in the voutside plates 311 and extend beneath the belts 364 (Figs. 14, 20 and 48). Each shaft 366 carries `six sleeves or rollers freely rotatable thereon, one .beneath each belt 364.

Seven such assemblies are shown for each plane of belts 364, although a greater or lesser number may be employed as the circumstances warrant. An idler roller 369 (Figs. 12 and 20) is provided for each belt 364,

the idler rollers 369 being freely mounted on a Yshaft 316 which extends through vertically elongated openings 311 in the outside plates 311. An adjustment screw 312 bears against each outer end of each shaft 310 for maintaining the idlers f.

.369 in engagement with the belts 364. Each adjustment screw 312 has threaded support in a bracket 313 secured to the plate 311 by suitable bolts 314.

Four carton guide fingers 380 (Figs. 6, 12 and 16) are provided above each set of belts 364, being l ,ready for the next action of the pusher mecha- The relationship of a carton 332 and nism 13. .its usual separators 383 to the holders 381 and vthe fingers 386 is clearly shown in Figs. 12 and 16. Each rack 350 is formed at its end remote from .the teeth 351 with an offset button 386 (Figs. 24 'and 25), and is supported by spaced bracket strips 381 secured to the outside plate 311 by suitable 'bolts 383 (Fig. 20). A stop member 396 (Fig. 22) vis adjustably secured on the rack 353 by suitable ysetscrews 391. One end of a tension spring 392 (Fig. 12) is secured to the stop member 391) by a "suitable screw 353, the other end being secured to the plate 311. The tension spring 392 biases lthe rack 350 to the position in Fig. 12, the righthand bracket strip 331 forming an abutment against which the stop 396 strikes. j Power means .is provided for moving the operatively disposed rack 351) to the left, considering ,Fig..l2, in the form of a solenoid actuated air Ymotor 331 (Figs. 12 and 14). The air motor 391 ris mounted on a bracket 398 secured by welding,

or the like, to the frame plate 86. The air motor 331 includes a plunger 399 which is aligned with the button 386. A solenoid 466, when energized, opens the valve of the air motor 391 to effect movement of the plunger 399 outwardly. The solenoid operated air motor 331 is of standard construction'and, hence, further description is unnecessary. The circuit of the solenoid 460 is described in detail below in the description of Fig. 4. The details of the mechanism for rotating the rotary table mechanism 18 are set forth below in the description of the indexing mechanism 19.

The case guide (Figs. 5, 6 and 16) is disposed adjacent the table mechanism 18 and includes an arcuate metal plate 435 substantially concentric with the axis of rotation of the rotary table mechanism 18. As is clear from Fig. 5, the plate 435 extends upwardly to substantially the top of the upside down carton 382 disposed over the bottles 116 on the rotary table mechanism 1t. The plate 4115 is welded or otherwise secured to a shaft 466 supported by spaced brackets 461 mounted atop the frame plates and 86. Suitable setscrews 468 secure the shaft 436 in removable position on the brackets 431. Near its lower end, the plate 405 rests on the left-hand upper tie rod 83 as viewed in Fig. 16.

The indexing mechanism 19 is provided for rotating the rotary table mechanism 18 through one hundred and eighty degrees of rotation at a predetermined point in the case loading cycle in order to remove a group of assembled bottles 116, or the like, from assembled position into a carton 382 in neck down positions and todispose the table mechanism 18 for further assembly of bottles 116 with minimum loss of time (Figs. 5, 6, 12, 13 and 311-35) The shaft 365 of the rotary table mechanism 18 has a reduced portion 411 at the right end when Viewing Fig. 12, which carries keyed thereto a small gear 412 (Figs. 12 and 13). Meshing with the gear 412 is a large gear 413 which is mounted on a suitable stub shaft 414 supported by the frame plate `36 (Fig. '1). A ratchet wheel 416 is secured to the large gear 413 for rotation therewith by suitable bolts, or the like, which extend through openings 411 provided in the ratchet wheel 416 (Fig. 49) and into the inner face of the gear 413. The ratchet wheel 416 is provided with eight equi-spaced shoulders 418. A ratchet crank arm 423 is rotatably mounted on the inner end of the stub shaft 414 adjacent the inner face of the ratchet wheel 416 (Fig. 13) and pivotally supports adjacent its outer free end a pawl 421 biased by a tension spring 422 into engagement with the periphery of the ratchet wheel 416, one end of the spring 422 being secured to the pawl 421 and the other end to an edge of the ratchet crank arm 420.

For power actuation of the crank arm 420, there is provided a standard commercial solenoid operated air motor 425 actuated by asolenoid 424, said air motor 425 being pivotally mounted at 426 on a bracket 421 secured by suitable bolts 428 to the plate 112 (Figs. 12 and 13). The air motor 425 includes a piston rod 423 which threadedly or otherwise receives on its end to permit adjustment an extension member 433 which is pivotally connected at 431 to the crank arm 426 intermediate the ends thereof. It is manifest that a power stroke of the piston rod 429 of the air motor 425 will effect rotation of the shaft 3115 through the several elements just described. It is to be understood that the n @crepes -tf f the gears' 4|2 and 413 and the stroke of 'the piston rod 429 are correlated to effect a rota- 'cal circuit of the switch 432 is detailed below in the description of Fig. 4.

An indexing locating ratchet wheel 43% is keyed to the shaft 335 for rotation therewith adjacent the frame plate 85 and remote from the small gear 4I2 (Figs. 5, 6, 12, 32, 33 and 35). Setscrews 436 extend through suitable threaded openings in the hub thereof to prevent axial displacement. The ratchet wheel 435 includes two diametrically opposed shoulders 431 and two diametrically opposed openings 433. A locating pin 440 is mounted in a bushing 441 press fitted or otherwise secured in an opening through an enlarged block-shaped bearing portion 442 formed integral with or secured to the frame plate 85 (Figs. 6, 32, 36 and 31'). The locating pin 448 includes a head 443 having a channel 444 therein. As is manifest from the drawings, the locating pin 440 successively engages the opening 438 in the locating ratchet wheel as they valign therewith in the indexing rotation of the table mechanism 18.

A locating pin operating arm 441 (Figs. 5, 32 and 34) is provided for withdrawing the locating pin 440 from securing the locating ratchet wheel 435 against rotation which includes a main arm 448, an enlargement 443 at one end thereof, an apertured bearing hub 458 at the other end, and an opening 45| in the arm 448 intermediate the ends. Extending radially from the hub 458 is a post 452, and threaded setscrew openings 453 are provided in opposed position. The operating arm 441 is mounted on a vertical rotatably mounted shaft 455 through the medium o the hub 458. Setscrews 456 (Fig. 30) secure the operating arm 441 to the shaft 455 for rotation therewith. A post 451 is pivotally mounted at 458 (Fig. 6) in the opening 45! of the operating arm 441, the post 451 extending through a suitable opening in the frame plate 85 and carrying on its free end a compression spring 453 which abuts at onek end the inner face of the frame plate 85 and at the other end a suitable washer anchored to the post 451, thereby biasing the operating arm into the position of Figs. 6 and 32, in which the locating pin 445 engages an opening 438 in the locating ratchet wheel 435. It is clear from the drawings that the enlargement engages in the channel 444 of the locating pin 448, and that clockwise pivotal movement of the operating arm 441, as viewed in Fig. 6, effects withdrawal action of the pin y144i).

The shaft 455 is pivotally mounted in spaced bearing brackets 46! adjacent the upper end thereof and a bearing bracket 432 adjacent the lower end thereof (Fig. 5), the former brackets being secured to the outer face of the frame plate 85 by suitable bolts 453 and the latter by suitable bolts 454. It is to be observed. that the lower end of the shaft 455 is reduced at 435, and that this reduced portion 465 is received by the bearing bracket 452 in a manner to support the shaft 455 against downward movement.

A locating pawl 488 is pivotally mounted on a stud 469 supported by the bearing portion 442 of the frame plate 85, a suitable nut 410 engaging the threaded free end thereof to maintain the stud 439 in place (Figs. 5, 32 and 33). The free end of the pawl-458 normally engages one of the shoulders 431 of the locating ratchet wheel 435. Welded or otherwise secured to the pawl 458 is a bracket 411 which supports a coupling niember 412, the latter including a reduced extension 413 which is peened over or otherwise secured in an opening formed in the bracket 41|. A connecting shaft 414 is pivotally connected at 415 to the coupling 412 at one end and at the other end is pivotally connected at 416 to a coupling 411 of the same form as the coupling 412. The coupling 411 includes a reduced extension 418 (Fig. 30) which extends through an opening in the vertical ange of a bracket 419 and is peened over to secure the coupling 411 thereto. The bracket 419 is welded or otherwise secured to a hub member 488 pivotally mounted on the shaft 455. Setscrews 481 secure the hub 488 to the shaft v455 for rotation therewith. A spacing collar 482 separates the hub 430 from the hub 458. A tension spring 483 biases the free end of the pawl 488 into engagement with the periphery of the ratchet Wheel 435, one end thereof being connected to a postl 484 anchored 'in the connecting shaft 414 and the other end to a pin 483 anchored in the frame plate (Fig. 5). It is manifest from the foregoing that rotation of the shaft 455 effects pivotal action of the pawl 438 counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 5, to withdraw its free end from engagement with the shoulder 431 of the ratchet wheel 435 and that, upon release of the shaft 455, the spring 483 will return the free end of the pawl 458 to engage*- ment with the periphery of the ratchet wheelf435 to insure contact with the next shoulder 431. As is indicated in Fig. 32, space is provided between the connecting shaft 414 and the bight of the U-shaped opening of the coupling members 412 and 411, so that pivotal action between the couplings 412 and 411 and the connecting shaft 414 may be effected. v

Power means for rotating the shaft 455 clockwise, when viewed in Fig. 6, is provided in the form of a standard commercial solenoid actuated air motor 481 including a solenoid 488, the air motor 481 being mounted on the outer face of the frame plate 85 and also including a plunger 439 (Fig. 5). The plunger 489 has adiustably threaded on the free end thereof a bifurcated member 493 which is pivotally connected to an ear 491 welded or otherwise vsecured to the shaft 455 for rotation therewith. For energizing the solenoid 488 and initiating the indexing sequence there is provided a normally open make-and-break switch 492 closed by a push button 493 and mounted on the outer bracket 401 (Fig. 5). The electrical circuit of the solenoid 488 and the switch 492 is detailed below in the description of Fig. 4.

Two switches 494 and 495 are mounted on the inner face of the frame plate 85 in vertical tandem relation adjacent the shaft 455 and near the hub 459 (Figs. 5, 30 and 31). The switch 494 is of the single stationary contact type, is normally open, and is disposed in the circuit of the power initiating means of the conveyer mechanism 8|. The switch 495 is of the two stationary contact type and alternates between the circuit of the solenoid 424 of the air motor 425 and the circuit of the solenoid 488 of the 17 air motor 48'1, normally being operatively closed in the latter circuit. The switches 494 and 495 include rotatable actuating shafts 495 and 451 which are connected by a U-shaped member 498 for simultaneous actuation of the switches 494 and 495. The U-shaped member 198 is disposed in the path of the post 452 of the hub 456 and is adapted to be rotated thereby upon rotation of the shaft 1255 by the air motor 467. The electrical circuits of the switches 494 and 465 are detailed below in the description of Fig. 4.

The loaded case receiving and discharge conveyer mechanism 8| is located beneath the table mechanism '18 and between the frame plates 55 and 86 (Figs. '7, 12, 13, 16 and 26 through 29). A pair of spaced shafts 566 is supported on the bottom lange 93 of the frame plate 66, each being secured in vertical position by a bracket 591 which receives the upper end thereof (Figs. 7 and 13). Slidably mounted on the shafts 551) is a conveyer lift casting 562 which may be of aluminum or other metal and is preferably of the form clearly shown in Figs. 28 and 29. The casting 562 includes a U-shaped body portion 563 from one side of the legs of which extend parallel arms 564 and from the other side of which, centrally of the bight, extends a bifurcated lug 565. As is clear from Figs. '7 and 12, the arms 564 extend inwardly from the frame plate 86 and the lug 505 extends outwardly through an elongated slot 566 provided in the frame plate 86.

Power means for reciprocating thecasting 502 is provided in the form of a standard commercial solenoid operated air motor 501, mounted on a bracket 5138 supported by the frame plate 86, which is pivotally connected to the lug 555 'at 5119 by a member 516 threadedly engaging the threaded end of the air motor plunger 511. The air motor 50'1 includes a solenoid 512, the electrical circuit of which is more particularly described below in the description of Fig. 4, which operates the valve of the air motor 50'1 to move the casting 562 on the shafts 5110.

A conveyer 515, preferably of the construction shown in Fig. 26, is supported on the arms 504 of the casting 592. The conveyer 515 includes channel side members 516 from one end of which extend tilting straps 511. Welded to and spacing the side members 516 are end members 518. Intermediate strap members 519 are welded to the end members 518 and are disposed parallel to the side members 516. The intermediate strap members 519 cooperate with the opposed side members 516 to support a plurality of roller studs 5211 which are peened over at their ends, or otherwise secured, to prevent accidental removal, each of which supports a freely rotating roller 521. The conveyer 515 rests on both arms 564 of the casting 562 when in the position shown in Fig. 16 in full lines, being pivotally connected to the right-hand arm 554 (looking at Fig. 16) by spaced hinge plates 523 secured to the arm 564 by suitable bolts 524, a hinge pin 525 extending through each side member 516 and through the pintle receiving portion of the associated hinge plate 523 (Figs. 12 and 16).

An arcuate plate 528 of less width than the distance between the intermediate straps 519 of the conveyer 515 is disposed between the straps 519 and forms, in eifect, a continuation of the plate 465 of the case guide 89 when the conveyer 515 is in raised position (Figs. 12 and 16). The plate 528 is pivotally supported at the upper ends of two spaced pivot arms 529, the particular configuration of which is shown in Fig. 27, the upper end of each pivot arm 529 being formed as a bearing sleeve 535 which fits between a pair of brackets 561 welded or otherwise secured to the bottom of the plate 528, being pivotally connected thereto by a suitable connecting pin 532. The pivot arm 525 also includes a centrally located bearing hub 534 and an apertured enlargement 535. Each bearing hub 534 is pivotally mounted on a stub shaft 536 supported by spaced bearing blocks 53'1 secured to the intermediate straps 519 of the conveyer 515 by welding, or the like, and depending therefrom, as is clear from Fig. 16. A. 1-shaped conveyer link 538 is pivotally connected at 535 and 566 to the enlargement 535 of the two pivot arms 529. At the juncture of one leg and the bight thereof, the U-shaped conveyer link 535 supports a roller 541. A plate 642 welded to the iianges 93 of the frame plates 65 and 26 and extending therebetween is disposed beneath the roller 541 and limits its downward travel, thereby causing a breaking action of the link 536 and the pivot arms 529 to lower the plate 526 relative to the conveyer 515. A heavy tension spring 5411 is connected at one end to a post 565 secured to the forward leg of the link 538 (viewing Fig. 16) and at the other end to an eye member 546 anchored in a strap 54'1 welded at its ends to the bottom ilanges 93 of the frame plates and 86. The spring 544 biases the arcuate plate 528 towards and into raised position above the conveyer 515. An adjustable stop screw 5113 threadedly mounted in a strap 569 welded or otherwise secured to the strap members 519 limits counterclockwise movement of the left pivot arm 529, and, hence, determines the upper position of the arcuate plate 526. A compression spring 543 surrounds the bottom portion of each shaft 500, which serve as bumpers for the casting 502.

A switch 556 is supported by a bracket 551 secured to the left-hand intermediate strap 519 of the conveyer 515 (viewing Fig. 12). The switch 556 includes a rotatable actuating shaft 552 to which is secured an arm 553 which extends upwardly between a notch 556 (Fig. 12) provided in the plate 528. The switch 556 is of the movable switch bla'de two stationary contact type, and is effective to establish a holding circuit for the solenoid 512 when in one position. The electrical circuits of the switch 5511 are detailed below in the description of Fig. 1.

A tilting bar 555 is secured by bolts 556 to the vertical flanges 91 of the frame plates 85 and 86 at a point beneath the uppermost position of the tilting straps 511 of the conveyer 515. The tilting bar 555 is contacted by the tilting straps 517 of the conveyer 515 in the downward travel of the conveyer 515 to tilt it to the position shown in broken lines in Fig. 16 to permit a loaded carton 382 to slide to the floor or to an adjacent conveyer platform, or the like, as indicated by the arrow A. It is to be noted that the plate 526 is lowered relative to the conveyer 515, as stated above, as the conveyer mechanism 81 descends, thereby dropping the carton 332 from its raised position shown in full lines in Fig. 16 into contact with the rollers 521 of the conveyer 515.

A main power switch 566 is provided which is mounted on the outer face of the frame panel 65 and which includes on and o buttons 561 and 562, respectively (Fig. 5). An emergency switch 565 operated by a manual hold-down button 566 is provided to stop the pusher mechanism "13v and the air motor 391 inv the event a

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2904944 *Feb 18, 1955Sep 22, 1959Int Machinery Corp SaMachines for filling cases, cartons or other packages with containers such as cans
US2962849 *Dec 18, 1958Dec 6, 1960Layton Jr James LPackaging machine
US2982072 *Jul 6, 1954May 2, 1961Anthony R SilvaCasing machine
US2995880 *Apr 29, 1958Aug 15, 1961Remington Arms Co IncAmmunition orienting and packing machine
US3074215 *Oct 13, 1960Jan 22, 1963Cascade Frozen Foods IncBox loading apparatus
US3075586 *Jul 2, 1958Jan 29, 1963Otis Eng CoNipple with lateral port control
US3190052 *Oct 19, 1962Jun 22, 1965Du Broff WarrenCarton handling apparatus
US3204752 *Aug 1, 1963Sep 7, 1965Conner Donald JBottle feeding apparatus for washer
US3443355 *Feb 3, 1967May 13, 1969Owens Illinois IncCase packing apparatus
US4050217 *Oct 17, 1975Sep 27, 1977Newcastle Company, Inc.Case packer container feeding apparatus
US4343390 *Jul 10, 1980Aug 10, 1982Laub Iii HermanCaser unit for containers
DE1256152B *Mar 6, 1965Dec 7, 1967Brauerei Und KellereimaschinenVorrichtung zum Aufreihen und zum Zufuehren von Flaschen oder aehnlichen Gefaessen zu Behandlungsmaschinen, insbesondere zu Maschinen zum Beladen von Kaesten
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/499, 198/429, 53/539, 74/169, 53/243, 414/421, 74/128, 414/564, 198/403
International ClassificationB65B21/22, B65B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B21/22
European ClassificationB65B21/22