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Publication numberUS2680309 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 8, 1954
Filing dateDec 29, 1951
Priority dateDec 29, 1951
Publication numberUS 2680309 A, US 2680309A, US-A-2680309, US2680309 A, US2680309A
InventorsEsther Peterson
Original AssigneeEsther Peterson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strap play sandal with insole extension
US 2680309 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 8, 1954 E PETERSON 2,680,309

STRAP PLAY SANDAL WITH INSOLE EXTENSION Filed Dec. 29, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet l z In 'lll/Illu 'gmxxxxwnf YL 'IIIIIIIIIT ESTHER PETERSON June 8, 1954 E PETERSON 2,680,309

STRAP PLAY SANDL WITH INSOLE EXTENSION Filed Dec. 29. 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 'l "IIIIIIIIIIIM 4Z INI/NTOR.

H zz 5 ETHER PETERSON 5K/f- BY dbb Patented June 8, 195.4

UNITED STATES arri-:ufr OFFICE STRAP PLAY SANDAL WITH INSOLE EXTENSION Esther Peterson, New York, N. Y.

Application December 29, 1951, Serial No. 264,014

3 Claims. l.'

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in play shoes.

. More specically, the. present invention proposes the construction of play shoes of the type to be Worn at the beach, in the country orfor comfort in the home or on the cityr streets, which are characterized by sole members for extension across the bottom of the foot and which are held in position on thebottom of the foot. by means of cords or the like extended from the edge portions of the sole members.

Another object of the present invention proposes characterising the sole-member by an inner sole and an outer sole` secured to the inner sole and Which inner sole is of a peripheral size greater than the peripheral size of said outer sole i-na manner to have edge portions projected beyond the edges of the outer sole which edge portions are used for attachment of the means for holding the sole member ink positionon the bottom of the foot.

Still another object of the present invention proposes forming. the outersole of-an inner layer of sponge rubber or other resilient material covered on its bottom face with a thinouter wear layer in a manner to give the-sole -member greater resiliency over its entire length resulting in greater comfort to the-wearer of the play shoes.

The present invention further proposes securing a fiat resilient heelY to the outer face of the outer Wear layer.- of theouter soleatA the heel area thereof in a manner to increase the resilient thicknessat the rear endof the sole member to absorb shocks as the heel of the foot is brought down dur-ing. normal- Walking steps.

Still further, the present invention proposes several different means` carried by the projecting edge portions ofthe inner sole-in` a manner to attach the sole member inposition across the bottom of the foot.

It is a further object of the present invention to construct play shoes which are simple and durable, which are eifective for their intended purposes and which can be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference Will be had. to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

Ogn the accompanyingdrawingsforming a material part of this disclosure:-

Figure 1 is a side elevationalview of a play shoe constructedfinaccordance withthe presentinvention as itappears'when-.worn on the foot.

Fig. 2 isa plan View of the sole member per se as With the position of' the attaching cord shown in dot and. dash lines.

Fig. 3 is a partial enlarged longitudinal sectional vieW taken on the line 3-3l of' Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a partial enlarged transverse sectional View taken on the line 4 4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a -view similar to Fig. 1, but showing the play shoe constructed in accordance with a modification of the present invention.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the play shoe shown in Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged partial transverse sectional View taken on the line 'lf-T of: Fig. 5.

Fig. 8 is another View similar to- Fig. 1, but illustrating the play shoe constructed in accordance with a still further modification of thev present invention.

Fig. 9v is a plan. view of? Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is an enlarged partial transverse sectional vievv taken on the line Il0'-|'0 of'Fig. 8.

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of one of the anchor members used in the form of the invention shown in Figs. 8 to l0.

Fig. 12 isa perspective view of*V the. inner end Fig. 1'5 isranl enlarged partial transverse sec--v tional View taken on the line ISL-I5 of` Fig. 13.

TheV play shoe, according to the rst form of the present invention shown inFigs. 1 to 4, includes aV built-up'sole member 2li-having ali-inner sole 2l superimposediupon an outer sole 22. The:

inner sole 2| is of'a peripheral size greater than the peripheral size off'the-outer sole 22 and isV concentricallyV positioned on the outer sole so as to have edge portionsf 2i.a projected beyond the peripheral edges ofthe outer sole 22. The inner sole 2|. is attached totheouter sole 22 by a line of stitches23'extended about the` periphery ofthe outer sole 22'.

The outer sole 22 is-madev ofan-inner layer 22u of resilient material-and an outer Wear layer 22h. The inner layer .".lli2L isfpreferably formed offsponge rubber or other similar resilient material. The outer Wear layer 22h-is preferablya thin layer of leather, but may be formed-of solid rubberor of one of the flexible synthetic resinous materials. The layers- 22a ami-22b of"the-outersole22 are secured together by vulcanization, by the applica'- tion of a thin layerofmucilage'between-the-adja- 3 cent faces of the layers or in any other desired manner.

Extended along the bottom face of the outer Wear layer 22h of the outer sole 22 at the heel area of the sole member 20, there is a heel 24. The heel 24 is comprised of an inner cushion layer 24a of the same material as the inner layer 22B of the outer sole. The bottom face of the cushion layer 24a is covered by an outer wear layer 24b of the same material as the outer wear layer 22h of the outer sole 22. The layers 24B and 24b of the heel 24 are secured together in face contact in the same manner as the layers 22a and 22b of the outer sole.

The heel 24 is secured along its side and rear edges to the bottom face of the outer sole 22 by the same stitches 23 which secure the outer sole 22 to the inner sole 2|. The iront edge of the heel 24 is secured to the bottom face of the outer sole 22 by means of a transversely extended line of stitches 25', see Figs. 2 and 3.

The inner sole 2| is preferably a piece of rather heavy flexible leather so as to give the sole member the desired body to protect the bottom of the foot against injury by small stones or the like laying on the surface over which the wearer of the play shoes is walking. However, if desired, the inner sole 2| can be made of ber, rubber, a synthetic resinous material or any other desired material.

Means is carried by the projecting edge portions 2|a of the inner sole 2| for mounting the sole member 20 in position across the bottom of the Wearers foot. The mounting means comprises a heavy cord 26, which is laced throng? suitably arranged holes 21 formed in the project ing edge portions 2|a along the sides of the sole member 20. The ends of the cord 26 are located adjacent the back of the sole member to extend upward along the sides of the foot and be engaged about the ankle and tied into a bow 28, as shown in Fig. l.

The modication of the invention shown in Figs. to 7 distinguishes from the previous form only as regards the means for holding the sole member in position on the bottom of the wearers foot.

The holding means of the modification of the invention comprises a vamp member 30 extended laterally across the front portion of the sole member 20 and which has its side edge portions superimposed on the projecting side edge portions 2|a of the inner sole 2|.Y The side edge portions of the vamp member 30 are formed with spacedholes 3| which match the spacing of complementary holes 32 formed in the projecting edge portions 2 a, see particularly Fig. 7.

A heavy cord 33 has its intermediate portion threaded through holes 34 formed in the projecting edge portion 2|ab of the inner sole 2| at the front of the sole member 20. From the holes 34, the ends of the cord 33 are passed through the aligned sets of holes 3| and 32 securing the side edge portions of the vamp section 30 to the inner sole 2|. After leaving the last set of aligned holes 3| and 32, the ends of the cord 33 are free to be passed upward along the sides of the foot and be engaged about the angle and tied into a bow 35, as shown in Fig. 5.

In all other respects, the modication of the invention shown in Figs. 5 to 7 is similar to that described in connection with Figs. 1 to 4 and like reference numerals are used to identify like parts.

Referring now to the modification of the invention shown in Figs. 8 to 12, there is illustrated still another means for securing the sole member 20 in position on the bottom of the wearers foot.

The holding means of Figs. 8 to 12, includes a vamp member 40 which is extended laterally across the front of the sole member 20. The vamp member 40 is formed of a piece of heavy cloth material and has its side edges doubled back and secured in position by a line of stitches 4|, see particularly Fig. 10, forming a tunnel 42. The projecting edge portions 2|a of the inner sole 2| along the sides of the sole member 2i) is formed with spaced sets of elongated slots 43 through which the side edge portions of the vamp member 40 are selectively engageable. After the ends of the vamp have been extended through the desired slots 43, the elongated an'- chor members 44 of metal, wood or other material, are inserted into the tunnels 42 for retaining the vamp member 40 from being withdrawn from the slots 43. The ends of the anchor members 44 are formed with enlargements 45 which restrict the anchor members from being withdrawn from the slots 43.

The width of the vamp member 43 can be adjusted by pulling clown on the ends thereof to release the anchor members 44 so that they can be pulled out of the ends of the tunnels 42. The side edge portions of the vamp member 40 are then passed through the desired slots 43, depending upon whether the vamp member is to be made wider or narrower, and the elongated anchor members 44 are then re-engaged with the tunnels 42 securing the edge portions of the vamp member 4|) in position.

Extended upward from the sides of the sole member 23 adjacent the rrear end thereof, there is a pair of strap sections 4E which have their bottom ends doubled back upon themselves and secured in position by a line of stitches 41 forming a tunnel 48, see Fig. l2. Those bottom ends of the strap sections 4S are passed through slots 49 formed in the projecting edge portions Zia of the inner sole 2|. Elongated anchor members 5|) are passed through the tunnels 48 for rctaining the bottom ends of the strap sections 43 from being withdrawn from the slots 49. The anchor members 56 are formed at their ends with enlargements 5| which retain the anchor members 50 from being withdrawn from the tunnels 48.

The free ends oi the strap sections 4S are extended upward along the sides of the foot and passed about the angle. The free end of one of the strap sections 46 is provided with a buckle 52 having the usual tongue 53 which is selectively engageable with the holes 54 formed in the free end of the other strap section for closing the ends of the strap sections 4E about the ankle, as shown in Fig. 8.

In all other respects, the form of the invention shown in Figs. 8 to l2 is similar to that described in connection with Figs. l to 4 and like reference numerals are used to identify like parts in all of the views.

The modification of the invention shown in Figs. 13 to 15 illustrates still another method of mounting the sole member 2B in position extended across the bottom of the wearers foot.

The projecting edge portions 2|a of the inner sole 2i is formed with sets of laterally aligned spaced slots 68. An elongated strap 6| has its intermediate portion laced through the slots 60 to cross over the top of the sole member 20, as best shown in Fig. 14. .The ends of the strap El after 5 leaving the rearmost sets of slots 60 are free to be passed upward along the sides of the foot and then -be passed around the ankle of the foot, as shown in Fig. 13. The one end of the strap 6| carries a buckle 62 having a pivotally mounted tongue 63. The other end of the strap 6l has spaced holes 64 for selective engagement by the tongue 63'for adjustably closing the ends of the strap about the ankle.

In all other respects, the form of the invention shown in Figs. 13 to 15 is similar to that described in connection with Figs. 1 to 4 and like reference numerals are used to identify like parts.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as dened in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I Vclaim as new and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A play sandal comprising an outer sole, an inner sole superimposed and supported on said outer sole and secured thereto, said inner sole eX- tending beyond the peripheral edge of said outer sole, said inner sole being provided with slots on opposite sides adjacent the peripheral edge theremember and enlargements at the ends thereof to restrict Withdrawal from said slots.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein said inner sole includes spaced parallel slots whereby the vamp can be adjusted for width, and the ends of said anchor members are bent.

of and outwardly of the outer sole, a single vamp 30 member extending through said slots and terminating in tunnel margins beneath the inner sole,

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,182,325 Sedmak May 9, 1916 1,497,852 Hooper June 17, 1924 1,681,548 Marcus Aug. 21, 1928 1,888,862 Mathews Nov. 22, 1932 2,033,313 Wilson Mar. 10, 1936 2,081,375 Hartman May 25, 1937 2,112,613 Waxelbaum Mar. 29, 1938 2,435,668 Gehringer et al. Feb. 10, 1948 2,507,120 Shapiro May 9, 1950 2,519,108 Bryant Aug. 15, 1950 2,552,943 Danielius May 15, 1951 2,588,061 Vesely Mar. 4, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 871,103 France Jan. 3, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1182325 *Nov 12, 1915May 9, 1916Vinco SedmakShoe.
US1497852 *Aug 12, 1922Jun 17, 1924Hooper Edward JShoe
US1681548 *Jan 11, 1928Aug 21, 1928Jacob MarcusSandal
US1888862 *Aug 20, 1929Nov 22, 1932Dun Deer Sandals IncShoe
US2033313 *Sep 24, 1934Mar 10, 1936Wilson Wilmer SFootwear
US2081375 *Aug 11, 1936May 25, 1937Garner White StephenSandal
US2112613 *Apr 4, 1936Mar 29, 1938Waxelbaum Sol JShoe
US2435668 *Nov 13, 1945Feb 10, 1948Behringer Charles FPlay shoe or the like
US2507120 *Jun 19, 1946May 9, 1950Martin ShapiroShoe with movable thonged upper
US2519108 *Aug 2, 1948Aug 15, 1950Bryant Fred VShoe having detachable upper
US2552943 *Apr 30, 1948May 15, 1951Jones & Malyon LtdShoe having a detachable upper
US2588061 *Dec 27, 1949Mar 4, 1952Svit NpShoe having an upper formed of strap members each secured by a flat fastener member
FR871103A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2724913 *May 19, 1955Nov 29, 1955Russell Tbyra ASandal construction
US3002297 *Feb 19, 1960Oct 3, 1961Neilson Mary DFootwear
US3678604 *Jun 25, 1971Jul 25, 1972Herbert Levine IncShoe and fastening therefor
US3983642 *Dec 4, 1974Oct 5, 1976Liao Wei ChiShoe having interchangeable uppers
US5150536 *Jan 9, 1990Sep 29, 1992Molly StrongWinter weather footwear article
US5553399 *Nov 14, 1994Sep 10, 1996Strong; MollyLightweight footwear article providing improved traction
US6606803 *Sep 3, 1999Aug 19, 2003Deckers Outdoor CorporationFootwear sole and arch strapping system
US7272897 *Mar 28, 2003Sep 25, 2007Zu Sheng YuSandal having a variety of lacing styles
US7347010 *Jan 29, 2005Mar 25, 2008Zu Sheng YuShoe having a variety of lacing styles
US8302329Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
US8656612Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
US8857077Sep 30, 2010Oct 14, 2014Nike, Inc.Footwear with internal harness
US8875417Sep 30, 2010Nov 4, 2014Eileen ALBERISandal
US20050055844 *Oct 30, 2004Mar 17, 2005Yu Zu ShengShoe having a variety of lacing styles
US20050132616 *Jan 29, 2005Jun 23, 2005Yu Zu S.Shoe having a variety of lacing styles
US20050257399 *Mar 28, 2003Nov 24, 2005Yu Zu SSandal having a variety of lacing styles
US20060000112 *Jun 30, 2004Jan 5, 2006Chien Ching-HoDouble head sleeper structure
US20100313449 *Jun 11, 2009Dec 16, 2010Patrick BrownOuter sole support
US20110067269 *Mar 24, 2011Johnny LuoSlippers structure
US20110113650 *May 19, 2011Nike, Inc.Footwear with Counter-Supplementing Strap
US20130091732 *Apr 18, 2013Danilo MendozaFootwear and Related Accessories
EP1613184A1 *Mar 12, 2004Jan 11, 2006Zu Sheng YuSandal having a variety of lacing styles
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 36/15, 36/28, 36/16, 36/30.00R, 36/101
International ClassificationA43B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/122
European ClassificationA43B3/12A