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Publication numberUS2681019 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1954
Filing dateMar 18, 1952
Priority dateMar 18, 1952
Publication numberUS 2681019 A, US 2681019A, US-A-2681019, US2681019 A, US2681019A
InventorsBenjamin Liebowitz
Original AssigneeBenjamin Liebowitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for manufacturing bielastic tapes
US 2681019 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1954 B, LIEBQWITZ 2,681,019

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING BIELASTIC TAPES Filed March 18, 1952 I 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

9E :rAn m L|E8ourrz June 15, 1954 a. LIEBOWITZ 2,681,0

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING BIELASTIC TAPES Filed March 18, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 PAS 74A CE INVENTOR. BEHII'AMIN Lle'aowrrz Patented June 15, 1954 [TED STATES OFFICE Benjamin Liebowitz, Lewisboro, N. Y.

Application March 18, 1952, Serial No. 277,165

23 Claims. 1

In my copending U. S. patent applications Serial No. 190,092, filed October 14, 1950, now Patent No. 2,601,035, dated June 17, 1952, for Wearing Apparel and Methods of Producing the Same; Serial No. 199,317, filed December 5, 1950, now Patent No. 2,601,036, dated June 17, 1952, for Articles of Wearing Apparel; Serial No. 217,341, filed March 24, 1951, now Patent No. 2,601,037, dated June 17, 1953, for Collars and Method for Preventing Curling of Collars; and Serial No. 247,910, filed September 24, 1951, now Patent No. 2,601,038, dated June 17, 1952, for Anticurl Devices for Collars, of which the present application is a continuation-in-part, I have disclosed devices for causing a countercurling tendency in a garment part to oppose the curling forces imposed on such garment part by the wearing thereof. For instance, the points of collars and the tops of girdles often tend to curl away from the body of the wearer; in the aforesaid applications it is shown how to oppose this curling tendency by anticurling forces produced by a bielastic structure comprising a flexible compression-resistant substantially nonstretchable element and a flexible permanently stretched elastic element attached in permanent tension-creating state to said compression-resistant element. Moreover, in my patent application Serial No. 247,910, I have pointed out that a very significant improvement is obtained in the functioning of the anticurl devices by having variable tension in the elastic element so as to create anticurling forces which are stronger in some regions than in others.

The object of this invention is to provide methods and apparatus for the manufacture of such antiourl strips, viz. apparatus and methods for feeding two strips, one a flexible compressionresistant substantially non-stretchable tape and the other a flexible elastic substantially non-compression-resistant strip or tape, e. g. a rubber tape, at required relative rates into a uniting machine, e. g. a sewing machine, so that the resulting composite bielastic tape structure will have the desired stretch in the rubber; and where that stretch is variable, the desired distribution of stretch along its length.

The method and apparatus for achieving this object will be understood by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic isometric View of an arrangement designed to feed an elastic rubber tape at a predetermined rate relative to the feeding of a substantially non-stretchable tape so as to produce a uniform stretch in the elastic rubber tape relative to this non-stretchable tape;

Fig. 1A is a graph showing the relationship between percentage elongation of the rubber tape and distance along the composite tape produced by the apparatus of Fig. 1;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic isometric view of an apparatus for feeding an elastic tape at a variable predetermined rate relative to the feeding of a substantially non-stretchable tape so as to produce a stretch in the elastic tape having a predetermined approximately sinusoidal variation along the length of the composite bielastic tape;

Fig. 2A is a graph showing the relationship between the stretch or percentage elongation of the rubber and the distance along the composite bielastic tape as produced by the arrangement of Fig. 2;

Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic isometric View of an apparatus similar to the apparatus shown in Fig. 2, but equipped with a cam instead of an eccentric roll;

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of an apparatus operating on the same principles as the apparatus shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of an apparatus op-. erating on the same principles as the apparatus shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a rear side elevation showing an arrangement for electrically operating a cutoff device of the type shown in Fig. 4;

Fig. '7 is a side elevation of a modification of the apparatus shown in Fig. 4 and operating primarily, but not altogether, on the principles of the apparatus shown in Fig. 2; and

Fig. 8 is an end elevation-as seen from the right of Fig. 7-of the apparatus shown in Fig. 7.

Referring to Fig. 1, the needle of a sewing machine is diagrammatically indicated at H in association with-the presser foot 12 of the machine. As a feeding mechanism on the sewing machine I prefer to employ a pair of rolls 13-! 3A behind the presser foot instead of the usual feeddog arrangement. These rolls are intermittently driven in proper relation to the needle motion so as to produce the desired feed.

The work being fed consists of two tapes, one shown at it, being a compression-resistant relatively non-stretchable cotton or other tape, e. g. a woven tape treated with resin or a woven tape employing relatively large monofilaments in the warp. The other tape shown at it is an elastic tape preferably made of rubber, e. g. of the kind used in so-called elastic garment tape. The ccmpressiomresistant non-stretchable tape 14 is fed over a feed roll or drum HS which rotates at such a rate that its peripheral speed is equal to the rate of feed of the feed rolls i3i3A. In practice I have found that the best method in this type of apparatus for producing equality of rate of feed due to the feed rolls 13-!3A and the rate of feed due to the rotation of the feed drum i6 is to drive the feed drum it by means of the non-stretchable tape It which is pulled at any desired rate by the feed rolls l3-l 3A.

The feed roll is is mounted on a shaft l which in turn is mounted in appropriate bearings not indicated in the diagrammatic Figures 1, 2 and 3. Mounted on the same shaft [7 and concentric with the drum It is a smaller drum l8 over which the elastic, stretchable tape i must pass. The working surfaces of both drums, that is, the surfaces which are in contact with the respective tapes, are roughened to produce a high coefficient of friction, e. g. by pasting strips of emery cloth over the peripheral faces of the drums. The di ameter of the drum I8 is chosen so as to produce a rate of feed of the elastic tape is lower than the rate of feed of the non-stretchable tape is by a predetermined amount so as to produce a uniform predetermined tension or elongation in the elastic tape. The formula for determining the elongation E in the rubber tape relative to the other tape is 16 lS D16 E-ZTI' 2WD; DIS 1 Where D16 is the diameter of the large feed roll it and D18 is the diameter of the small stretching roll l8.

Certain idler rolls for pressing the tapes it and I5 against their respective feed rolls are omitted from Fig. 1 in the interest of clarity but are shown in the corresponding Fig. 5.

The functioning of the device of Figure 1 will now be obvious: The sewing machine parts i i, it? and 53A are driven at a specified rate of feed so as to feed the non-stretchable tape ht at that specified rate. The tape it thereby drives the synchronizer roll it so that its peripheral speed ,is equal to the rate of feed produced by the stitching apparatus. This in turn determines the speed and hence rate of feed of the smaller stretching roll I 8, whose smaller peripheral speed causes a slower rate of feed of the rubber tape to produce the desired stretch in the rubber as indicated in the formula above. The two tapes are superimposed by appropriate guides and sewn together by the stitching mechanism of the machine diagrammatically indicated by the needle H and the presser foot [2.

For purposes of comparison with modifications described below, I have shown in Figure 1A a graph showing the elongation of the rubber tape as a function of the distance along the finished composite bielastic tape. In this particular case the elongation does not vary as one goes along the tape, i. e. it is uniform.

Now, as mentioned above, a very important improvement in anticurling properties results from making the tension or stretch in the rubber variable along the finished bielastic strip. Figure 2 shows a modification of the apparatus of Figure 1 showing how the desired periodic variation in tension is obtained. It will be seen that the essential difference between the apparatus of Figure 1 and that of Figure 2 is that the rubber feeding roll 18 of Figure l is concentric with the shaft l1 and roll !5, whereas in Figure 2 the rubber feeding roll now indicated by 58E, is eccentrically mounted on the shaft [1. The effect of this eccentric mounting is to cause a variation in the rate of feed of the rubber tape [5 relative to the rate of feed of the tape is because the point of tangency T at which the rubber tape It leaves the roll iSE is closer to the axis of shaft [7 at one point of its cycle but much farther from the axis of shaft I? at another point of the cycle and it is the distance of this point of tangency from the axis of the shaft [1 that determines the rate of feed at any given instant. The relative variation in tension is determined not only by the throw of the eccentric but also by the distance from the point of tangency T to the needle. An approximate formula for the elongation E as a function of the angular position A of the eccentric I813 is the following:

when D16 and D18 are the diameters of rolls It and IBE, respectively, e is the eccentricity (distance between roll centers) and R. is the distance from the point of tangency T to the needle M. This formula gives the instantaneous elongation as the stitching proceeds. The average elongation of the rubber is approximately given by the same formula as for Figure 1.

Figure 2A is a graph showing diagrammatically how the tension or elongation of the rubber varies approximately sinusoidally along the composite bielastic tape produced by the apparatus of Figure 2. It will be seen that there are points A, C, etc. where the tension is minimum, and other points B, etc. where the tension is maximum. The tape is subsequently cut at or near each point of maximum and minimum tension so that the resulting composite strip will have a maximum tension at or near one end and a minimum tension at or near the other end. It will be understood furthermore that each revolution of the roll It produces two finished tapes. Since prescribed lengths of strip will in general be required, the diameter of the drum I6 is preferably chosen so that the length of its periphery is just equal to the lengths of the two finished bielastic tape elements. Again, it will be understood that certain idler rolls are employed in the apparatus shown in Figure 2 which are not shown in this figure but are shown in the corresponding Figure 4.

Finally, it will be understood that the eccentric 98E of Figure 2 is merely one form of a cam. Other cam forms may be employed, e. g. as diagrammatically shown at [8C of Figure 3. This latter type of cam makes four bielastic strips for each revolution of the feed roll it.

Figure 4 shows a side elevation of the essential parts of a complete apparatus similar to the one diagrammatically shown in Figure 2. In Figure 4, l is the table top and 2 is the base of a conventional sewing machine. ll indicates the needle and I2 the presser foot as before; i3 and lBa, are a pair of feed rolls which are driven by the sewing machine according to well known methods. The non-stretchable tape [4 is pulled off a roll 3| and passes around an idler roll 32 so that it is pressed between the idler roll 32 and the working surface 33 (shown dotted) of the synchronizer roll 16, the working surface 33 being the bottom of a groove which is covered with emery cloth. The idler 32 is carried by a lever 34 which is pivoted on a pin 35 which is carried in the upright member 36, the said upright member 36 forming essentially the base of the entire feeding mechanism. After passing approximately 180 around the working surface 33, the non-stretchable tape it then passes under another idler roll 3'! which is carried on a lever 38 pivoted at 39 on a pin which is also carried by the upright member 36. The two idler rolls 32 and 31 are pressed against the working surface 33 by means of a tension spring connecting the two levers 34 and 38. Only one end of this spring is indicated at 48 on lever 34. After leaving the nip between the idler roll 31 and the working surface 33 the non-stretchable tape l4 passes to a guide 4! which is just ahead of the presser foot 12. The tape is guided under the presser foot l2 by a groove in the bottom of the same indicated by the dotted line; the presser foot guides and controls the tapes but exerts no vertical pressure on them. The stretching mechanism thus is driven at a continuous rate determined entirely by the rate of feed of the feed rolls [3 and 13a.

Eccentrically carried on the face of the drum I5 is a grooved roll or disc 42. The bottom of the groove of 42 indicated by the dotted line 43 is the working surface of the roll 42 and serves as a feed roll for determining the rate of feed of the rubber tape 15. This tape is fed without appreciable tension from a roll or spool 44 and passes around an idler roll 45 which presses against the bottom of the groove that constitutes the working surface 43 in the feed roll 42. The feed roll is for the non-stretchable tape i4 is mounted on a shaft 45, which is carried in bearings mounted on the upright member 36. The feed roll 42 is fastened to the side of the feed roll is so as to have the desired eccentricity with respect to the shaft 46 as diagrammatically indicated. As a result of this eccentricity the idler roll 45 which coacts with the working surface 43 of the feed roll 42 must be capable of movement to and away from the center of the shaft 45. To allow for this movement the idler roll 45 is rotatably mounted on the end of a lever 4'! which is pivotally mounted on pin 48 carried by an ex tension arm 49 mounted on the upright member 35. A tension spring 56 whose tension is adjustable by means of the screw and nut device 5i pulls the lever 41 upward so as to press the idler roll 45 against the coacting working surface 43.

The rubber tape i5 is thereby caused to move between the nip of the working surface 43 and the idler roll 45 so that its speed is determined by the peripheral speed of the working surface 43. Due to the eccentric location of this working surface the said rate of feed is periodically variable as described in connection with Figure 2. From the nip between the working surface 43 and the idler roll 45 the rubber tape i5 passes under the guide 4! there joining in superposed relation with the non-stretchable tape it. The two tapes then pass under the needle so that they are sewn together one on top of the other.

The composite bielastic tape takes the curly form indicated at X at the exit end of the apparatus. Here an electrical solenoidal cutoff device is shown at 52' which comprises a plunger 53 operated by the solenoid in casing 522 and carrying at its upper end a cutoff knife 54. This cutoff knife co-acts with an anvil 55 at an appropriate instant determined by the momentary switching on of the operating current for the solenoid 52 at the proper moment in the cycle of operations, as will be described below. For certain purposes it is preferable not to cut the tape apart by a cutoff mechanism shown at 54, 55 but merely to mark the tape with a good clear mark so that it can be cut off subsequently at the time that the tape is sewn into a collar, for example. A convenient Way of marking the tape for this purpose is by heated means similar to cutoff knife 54, but with reduced energy in the solenoid. Current for operating the solenoid 52 is carried to the solenoid by the leads 56A and 56B. The method of momentarily switching on the current will be described below.

For certain purposes it is desirable to use a heated cutoff knife 54 even when the tapes are cut apart and not merely marked. Thus, when the non-stretchable tape M has nylon monofils in its warp to make it compression-resistant, it is desir-able to heat-seal the ends of the tape to fix the nylon monofils at their ends. This heatsealing is readily accomplished by heating the cutoff blade 54.

Furthermore, I have found it sometimes convenient and advisable to use nylon sewing thread in place of the usual cotton sewing thread. Also in this event, it is advantageous to use a heated cutoff or marking blade 54 in order to seal the ends of the nylon sewing threads as well as to seal the ends of the nylon monofils.

Figure 5 is a side elevation of an apparatus which functions so as to provide a uniform elongation or tension in the rubber in the same manner as the apparatus shown in Figure 1.

It will be understood that in this machine the same sewing machine elements and other parts are used as in the apparatus shown in Figure t and hence only the modified stretching and thus tensioning feed mechanism of the machine is shown, in Figure 5. The non-stretchable tape I4 comes up from below and passes around the working surface SI of the roll 66, the said working surface 6! being the bottom of a groove cut in the roll it and surfaced with emery cloth. The roll i6 rotates on the shaft H which is mounted in a block $2. The two vertical bars 63A and 93B are pressed at their bottom ends into the block 62 and at their top ends into the bar 64. Another block as is bored so that it may slide on these bars. This block 65 carries a shaft 66 on which an idler roll 61 rotates freely. This idler roll 6'! co-acts with the working surface 6| in the roll iii. A spring 68 whose compressive force is adjustable by means of the screw 69 urges the block 65 downward so as to cause the idler roll er to press against the working surface it! of the roll 55. The relatively nonstretchable tape 24 is caused to pass between the nip of the idler roll 5? and the working surface 6: so that the rate of feed of the tape I4, which is determined by the rate of feed of the sewing machine, determines the rate at which the synchronizing feed roll l5 rotates. Concentric with the feed roll iii in accordance with Figure 1 is the stretching feed roll I8 which is rigidly connected to the synchronizing feed roll it so that the two rotate at the same speed. The rubber tape l5 passes around an idler roll l0 and then around the working surface H, shown in dotted lines, which is the bottom of a groove cut in the roll 13. The idler roll "it! is mounted so as to rotate freely on a pin l2 which is carried at the bottom end of the arm 73 which in turn is pivoted at 'E4 on the top member 54 of the assem bly. A spring '15 whose compressive force is adjustable by means of the nut 15 urges the arm 73 to the left, thereby causing the idler roll it to press against the working surface ll of the drum :e. The rubbertape therefore after passing part-way around the idler 10, passes between the nip of the roll I and the working surface H and then continues in contact with the working surface of H until it emerges tangentially therefrom as shown. Thus, the two tapes emerge side by side but at a differential rate of feed determined by the first formula given above.

Referring now to Figures 7 and 8, in these figures a mechanism is illustrated which operates primarily on the same principle as the apparatus shown in Figures 2 and 4 but in addition incorporates still other means for Varying the tension of the elastic tape as will be explained. In the embodiment shown in Figures 7 and 8 there is also the practical advantage that the two tapes go through the feeding mechanism with their central lines co-planar. In these figures, Hi indicates the non-stretchable tape as before, which passes around a grooved pulley it. As before, the bottom of the groove is covered with emery cloth so as to create high friction between the non-stretchable tape [4 and the pulley IS, thereby ensuring positive drive of the pulley it by the tape M. Again 42 indicates an eccentric which rotates on shaft it. Unlike Figure 4, the axis of rotation of pulley it does not coincide with the axis shaft of rotation of the eccentric 432, but the two axes are separated and spaced parallel to each other, as shown in Figure 7. The drive of the eccentric :32 is now obtained by means of the gear lll mounted on the shaft 48, the idler gear H2 and the gear H3 mounted on shaft #25. In Figure 7 the diameter of the eccentric 42 is chosen so that it gives the required average stretch of the rubber tape when the gear ratio between H i and H3 is 1 to 1. It will be readily understood, however, that any convenient diameter can be chosen for the eccentric t2 and then the gear ratio can be chosen so as to give the required average stretch to the rubber tape.

The shafts 36, 46', as well as the shaft for the idler gear H2 are all mouthed on a plate H which acts as a base for the entire mechanism. As in Figure 7, an idler roll is shown at H6 which presses the tape M against the grooved pulley it so as to insure positive drive of the pulley i6 by the tape I l. To obtain this pressure, a torsion spring H1 urges the lever i 58 toward the pulley it, the pulley H6 being rotatably mounted on the end of the lever i 58.

As before, the elastic tape i5 is pressed against the bottom of a groove in eccentric 32, e, g. by means of a small pair of closely spaced rolls H9 swiveled at the end of lever I26 which in turn is pivotally mounted on the base H5 at lZi. A torsion spring i22 presses on the lever 520 so as to press the roller pair i l9 and hence the rubber tape against the bottom of the groove in eccentric which again is covered with emery cloth so that the instantaneous rate of feed of the rubber tape is determined entirely by the rate of feed given to it by the eccentric 42, as a function of the angular position of eccentric t2. Rotatably mounted at l23 at the end of lever lid is a roller in over which the rubber tape passes on its way from the nips between eccentric 42 and the roller pair H9 to the guide roll I25 and thence to the sewing machine. It will be understood that in general the instantaneous rate of feed of the rubber is determined as in the apparatus shown in Figure 4 by the position of the eccentric in its cycle, the rate of feed being a minimum in the position shown in Figure '7, that is, where the hip is closest to the axis 46. A half-revolution later the nip will rise to the point where its distance from the shaft 46' is a maximum; at this point the rate of feed is a maximum; also at this point the roller 524 will have moved into the position indicated by the dotted lines at lz ia. It will also be clear that the path of the rubber tape l5 from the nip in its uppermost position over the roller in the osition 424a and thence under the roller I25 is shorter than the corresponding path of the tape from the nip in its lowest position as indicated by the solid lines in Figure '7, that is, from the nip over roller I24 and thence under roller I25. This variation in the length of the path of the rubber tape constitutes an additional means for varying the tension. With the nip shown in the position of Figure '7, the rate of feed is a minimum and the path length over 124 and 125 is a maximum, hence both effects contribute towards making the tension of the rubber a maximum in the configuration shown by the solid lines of Figure '7. On the other hand, a half revolution later, the rate of feed is a maximum and the path length of the rubber tape over the rolls is a minimum and both effects contribute towards making the tension in the rubber a minimum. It is a fact that this latter means can be used alone to obtain variable stretch and tension in the rubber. That is to say, the rate of feed of the rubber tape l5 can be made constant relative to the rate of feed of the non-stretchable tape M, in accordance with the scheme shown in Figure 1 and Figure 5, and an eccentric or other means can be used to move a pulley such as I24 cyclically so as to vary the length of the rubber periodically in its path from its feed roll to the guide of the sewing machine.

The actuating mechanism for the cutoff means described above in connection with Figure 4, is shown in Figure 6, including mainly those parts which are necessary to explain the operation of this cutoff mechanism.

The shaft I! extends through the rear of the vertical base member 35 and carries a disc iill so that the said disc rotates at the same speed as the roll 15. This disc Hll carries two pins 862A and B so that every half revolution one of them comes in contact with a roller I 33 of a microswitch I84, thereby closing at every half cycle the microswitch It? for a short time interval. The phase in the cycle where this circuit closing occurs is determined by the angular position of either the disc 1 ill or the microswitch EM. Hence, one or both of these angular positions is made adjustable so that the cutoff can be produced at the right moment in the cycle. Current from a power supply is carried through leads IGEA and B of the microswitch to the solenoid leads 56A and B of Figure 4 so that the closure of the microswitch by either pin EMA or B will energize the solenoid 52 of Figure 4 and cause it to operate the cutoff mechanism. In order to avoid dependence of the operation of the cutofi mechanism on the length of time during which the microswitch is closed by the mechanisms as indicated, which time of closure may be too long and also may be variable, I prefer other methods of determining the time interval during which the solenoid 52 of Figure 4 is energized. In practice I have found it convenient to use a circuit in which a condenser is charged through a suitable resistance during the period preceding each operation of the solenoid and in which closure of the microswitch lfi l operates a relay which discharges the said condenser into a relay which operates the solenoid 52. Details of such 9 a circuit are known in the electrical engineering art and need not be given here.

The cutoff device shown mainly in Figures provides a simple solution for an otherwise difficult roblem connected with the cutting off of the continuous bielastic tape as produced by the machine into short lengths required for use in collars, when the tension in the rubber is variable. Suppose, for example, that attempt was made to out such continuous bielastic tape into short strips of equal length after the continuous strip has been removed from the machine. Even if an accurate starting point could be found, a few thousandths of an inch error in each length of strip would produce an error amounting to an inch or more in the location of the cutoff with respect to the region of minimum (or maximum) tension after a few hundred or a thousand of such strips had been cut from the continuous bielastic tape because of unavoidable cumulative errors. The apparatus illustrated in Figures 4 and 6 is designed to eliminate such cumulative errors and relies on a method of cutting the bielastic tape as it emerges from the machine at or close to such position in the bielastic tape where the tension in the rubber is a minimum or a maximum, the position of the cutofi being determined by the phase in the cycle of operation of the machine itself when the instantaneous tension produced by the machine is an extremum (i. e. a minimum or maximum).

To avoid unnecessarily cumbersome language, I have referred to the feed produced by the rolls I3-l3A as continuous, also implying that it is uniform in contrast to the variable rate of feeding of the rubber tape in the apparatus of Figure 2. As a matter of fact, as everyone skilled in the art knows, on most sewing machines the feed produced by the rolls I3--I3A would actually be far from continuous; for instance, if the machine makes 3,600 stitches per minute, the feed rolls l3ltA will start and stop 60 times per second, so that there is no feed during the interval when the needle l is in the work. Due to elasticity of tape M, which drives the pulley I6 (despite the fact that the said tape has been described as substantially non-stretchable), and also due to the elasticity of other parts, and due finally to the inertia of all the parts which are moved when the tape it is fed by the rolls l3-!3A, the intermittent feeding of the work by the rolls l3l 3A will be, to some extent, smoothed out so that the motion of the roll it and all parts associated with it will not follow rigorously the intermittent motion of the rolls l3l 3A. Instead the motion of the roll I6 and its associated parts will be a rippling one which, for practical purposes associated with this invention may be regarded as continuous, ince the ripples will occur at a rate of about 60 ripples per second, more or less.

I claim:

1. Method of manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superimposed upon and facing each other a compressionresistant substantiallynon-stretchable tape and an elastic tape in considerably stretched tensioncreating condition; cyclically varying the degree of stretch of said elastic tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges between a maximum and a minimum; fastening said compression-resistant tape and said elastic tape to each other along their entire length While the stretch of the latter is cyclically varied and said tapes are fed along said predetermined path in superimposed condition, thus obtaining a continuous bielastic tape structure composed of said elastic tape fastened to one face of said compressionresistant tape and having in the direction of its length consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of said elastic tape ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof; and severing said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two consecutive zones thereof in synchronism with and depending upon said cyclical variations of the degree of stretch of said elastic tape and at substantially the same phase of each of said cyclical variations so as to obtain a plurality of bielastic tape elements each composed of an elastic tape portion fastened to a compression-resistant tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof and is in the direction of that face of said com-- prssion-resistant tape portion to which said elastic tape portion is fastened.

2. Method of manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superimposed upon and facing each other a compressionresistant substantially non-stretchable tape and an elastic tape in considerably stretched tensioncreating condition; cyclically varying the degree of stretch of said elastic tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges between a maximum and a minimum; fastening said compression-resistant tape and said elastic tape to each other along their entire length while the stretch of the latter is cyclically varied and said tapes are fed along said predetermined path in superimposed eondition, thus obtaining a continuous bielastic tape structure composed of said elastic tape fastened to one face of said compressionresistant tape and having in direction of its length consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of said elastic tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; and severing said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two consecutive zones thereof in synchronism with and depending upon said cyclic variations of the degree of stretch of said elastic tape and at substantially the same phase of each of said cyclic variations so as to obtain a plurality of bielastic tape elements, each composed of an elastic tape portion fastened to a compressionresistant tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum and a minimum and is in the direction of that face of said compression-resistant tape portion to which said elastic tape portion is fastened.

3. Method of manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superimposed upon and facing each other a compressionresistant substantially non-stretchable fabric tape and an elastic rubber tape in considerably stretched tension-creating condition; cyclically varying the degree of stretch of said elastic rubber tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges between a maximum and a minimum; fastening said compression-resistant tape and said elastic rubber tape to car. along their entire length while the stretch the latter is cyclically varied and said are fed along said predetermined path in superimposed condition, thus obtaining a continuous cielastic tape structure composed of said elastic rubber tape fastened to one face of said compression-resistant fabric tape and having in direction of its length consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of said elastic rubber tape ranges between a maximum in the region of one end there of and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof; and severing said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two consecutive zones thereof in synchronism with and depending upon said cyclic variations of the degree of stretch of said elastic rubber tape and at substantially the same phase of each of said cyclic variations so as to obtain a plurality of bielastic tape elements each composed of an elastic rubber tape portion fastened to a compression-resistant fabric tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof and is in the direction of that face of said compression-resistant fabric tape portion to which said elastic rubber tape portion is fastened.

4. Method of manufacturing connected bielastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superiznposed upon and facing each other a compression-resistant substantially non-stretchable fabric tape and an elastic rubber tape in considerably stretched tension-creating condition; cy-

clically varying the degree of stretch of eiastic rubber tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges between a maximum and a minimum; fastening said compression-resistant fabric tape and said elastic rubber tape to each other along their entire length while the stretch of the latter is cyclically varied and said tapes are fed along said predetermined path in cups"- imposed condition, thus obtaining a continuous bielastic tape structure composed of said elastic rubber tape fastened to one face of said compression-resistant fabric tape and having in direction of its length consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of said elastic rubber tape ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof; and marking said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two consecutive zones thereof so as to obtain a plurality of connected bielastic tape elements each composed of an elastic rubber tape portion fastened to a compressionresistant fabric tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof and is in the direction of that face of said compression-resistant fabric tape portion to which said elastic rubber tape portion is fastened.

5. Method of manufacturing connected b;- elastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superimposed upon and facing each other a compression-resistant substantially non-stretchable tape and an elastic tape in considerably stretched tension-creating condition; cyclically varying the degree of stretch of said elastic tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges between a maximum and a minimum; fastening said compression-resistant tape and said elastic tape to each other along their entire length while the stretch of the latter is cyclically varied and said tapes are fed along said predetermined path in superimposed condition, thus obtaining a continuous bielastic tape structure composed of said elastic tape fastened to one face of said compression-resistant tape and having in direction of its length consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of said elastic tape ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof; and marking said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two consecutive zones thereof in synchronism with and depending upon said cyclical variations of the degree of stretch of said elastic tape and at substantially the same phase of each of said cyclical variations so as to obtain a plurality of connected bielastic tape elements each composed of an elastic tape portion fastened to a compression-resistant tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof and is in the direction of that face of said compression-resistant tape portion to which said elastic tape portion is fastened.

6. Method of manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superimposed upon and facing each other a compressionresistant substantially non-stretchable tape and an elastic tape in considerably stretched tensioncreating condition; cyclically varying the degree of stretch of said elastic tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges between a maximum and a minimum; fastening said compression-resistant tape and said elastic tape to each other along their entire length while the stretch of the latter is cyclically varied and said tapes are fed along said predetermined path in superimposed condition, thus obtaining a continuous bielastic tape structure composed of said elastic tape fastened to one face of said compression-resistant tape and having in direction of its length consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of said elastic tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; and severing said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two consecutive zones thereof so as to obtain a plurality of bielastic tape elements, each composed of an elastic tape portion fastened to a compression-resistant tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum and a minimum and is in the direction of that face of said compression-resistant tape portion to which said elastic tape portion is fastened.

'7. Method of manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination the steps of feeding along a predetermined path, superimposed upon and facing each other a compression-resistant substantially non-stretchable tape and an elastic tape in considerably stretched tension-creating condition; cyclically varying the degree of stretch of said elastic tape so that during each of said cycles the stretch ranges bel which the stretch of said elastic tape ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof; and severing said continuous bielastic tape structure between each two con- 'secutive zones thereof so as to obtain a plurality of bielastic tape elements each composed of an elastic tape portion fastened to a compressionresistant tape portion so as to induce in the same a curvature which ranges between a maximum in the region of one end thereof and a minimum in the region of the other end thereof and is in the direction of that face of said compression-resistant tape portion to which said elastic tape portion is fastened.

8. Apparatus for manufacturing 'a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, during pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to for in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; and driving means for operating said stretching means during operation of said feeding means.

9. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, during pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the periods between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; anddriving means operated in synchronism with said feeding means and operating said'stretching means so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with said feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means.

10. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for feeding into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; stretching means arranged in the path of the fed elastic tape for stretching the same, during feeding by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and minimum; and driving means for operating said stretching means during operation of said feeding means.

11. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for feeding into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastictape; stretching means arranged in the path -'of the fed "elastic tape forstretching the same, during feeding by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; and driving means operated in synchronism with said feeding means and operating said stretching means so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with said feeding means feeding both tapes into the uniting means.

12. Apparatus for manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, during pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said strethed elastic tape consecutive zones corresponding to said cycles and in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; driving means for operating said stretching means during operation of said feeding means; cutting means arranged after said uniting means in the path of the joined tapes; operating means for operating said cutting means;'and actuating means interconnectin said operating means with said stretching means for periodic actuation of said operating means at the same phase of each stretching cycle of said stretching means so as to seversaid joined tapes between each two consecutive zones of said elastic tape.

13. Apparatus for manufacturing connected bielastic tape elements comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, during pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including-a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones corresponding to said cycles and in-each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a mum and a minimum; drivingmeans for-operav ing said stretching means during operation of said feeding means; marking means arranged after said uniting'means-in the path of the joined tapes; operating means for operating saidmarking means; and actuating means interconnecting said operating means with said stretching means for periodic actuation ofsaid operating means at the same phase of each stretching cycle of said stretching means so as to mark said joined tapes between each two consecutive zones of said elastic tape.

14. Apparatus for manufacturing connected bielastic tape elements comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feed ing means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression=resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer member arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape non-slidably engaging the same and rotated by said tape during pulling of the tape by said feeding means; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, duling pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones corresponding to said cycles and in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; driving means operated by said rotatable synchronizer member and operating said stretching means so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means; marking means arranged after said uniting means in the path of the joined tapes; operating means for operating said marking means; and actuating means interconnecting said operating means with said stretching means for periodic actuation of said operating means at the same phase of each stretching cycle of said stretching means so as to mark said joined tapes between each two consecutive zones of said elastic tape.

15. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to a compression-resistant tape passing through said uniting means an elastic tape superimposed upon said compressionresistant tape along the length thereof; feeding means for pulling said elastic tape at uniform speed into said uniting means; stretching means arranged in the path ofthe pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, during pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying tension produced by said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; and driving means for operating said stretching means during operation of said feeding means.

16. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer member arranged in the path of the pulled com- 'pression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer member so that the latter is rotated by said compressionreslstant tape during pulling of the latter tape by said feeding means; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same during pulling by said fee ing means; and driving means operated by said rotatable synchronizer member and operating said stretching means so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means.

17. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along preill determined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer roller arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer roller so that the latter is rotated by said compression-resistant tape during pulling of the same by said feeding means; a rotatable stretching roller arranged in the path of said elastic tape ncn-slidably en-. gaging the same; and driving means operated by said synchronizer roller and rotating said stretching roller so that the peripheral speed of said stretching roller is less than the pulling speed of said feeding means, resulting in stretching of the elastic tape pulled by said feeding means in synchronism with said feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means.

18. Apparatus for manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer member arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer member so that the latt r is rotated by said tape during pulling of the latter by said feeding means; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same during pulling by said feeding means with the degree of tension exerted by said stretching means on said elastic tape periodically varying during each of the periods between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape varies between a maximum and a minimum; driving means operated by said rotatable synchronizer member and operating said stretching means so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means; cutting means arranged after said uniting means in the path of the joined tapes; operating means for operating said cutting means; and actuating means interconnecting said operating means with said stretching means for periodic actuation of said operating means at the same phase of each stretching period of said stretching means so as to sever said joined tapes between each two consecutive zones of said elastic tape.

19. Apparatus for manufacturing a biela-stic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer roller arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer roller so that the latter is rotated by said compression-resistant tape during pulling of the same by said feeding means; a stretching roller having a smaller diameter than said rotatable synchronizer roller and arranged in the path of said elastic tape non-slidably engaging the same, said stretching roller being arranged rotatably about an eccentric axis so as to exert during its rotation on said elastic tape a tension periodically varying between a maximum and a minimum and to form in the elastic tape stretched by periodically varying tension consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape varies between a maximum and a minimum; and driving means operating by said rotatable synchronizer member and rotating said stretching roller about its eccentric axis so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means.

20. Apparatus for manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer roller arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer roller so that L the latter is rotated by said compression-resistant tape during pulling of the same by said feeding means; a stretching roller arranged in the path of said elastic tape non-slidably engaging the same, said stretching roller being arranged rotatably about an eccentric axis so as to exert during its rotation on said elastic tape a tension periodically varying between a maximum and a minimum and to form in the elastic tape stretched by said periodically varying tension consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape varies between a maximum and a minimum; driving means operated by said rotatable synchronizer member and rotating said stretching roller about its eccentric axis in such a manner that the average peripheral speed of said stretching roller is less than the pulling speed of said feeding means so that said stretch-- ing roller stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means; cutting means arranged after said uniting means in the path of the joined tapes; operating means for operating said cutting means; and actuating means interconnecting said operating means with said stretching roller for periodic actuation of said operating means at the same phase of each stretching period of said stretching roller so as to sever said joined tapes between each two consecutive zones of said elastic tape.

21. Apparatus for manufacturing bielastic tape elements comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer member arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer member so that the latter is rotated by said tape during pulling of the latter by said feeding means; a rotatable stretching member arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same during pulling by said feeding means with the degree of tension exerted by said rotatable stretching member on said elastic tape periodically varying during each of the periods between a maximum and a minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape varies between a maximum and a minimum; driving means operated by said rotatable synchronizer member and operating said rotatable stretching member so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means; cutting means arranged after said uniting means in the path of the joined tapes; operating means for operating said cutting means; and actuating means interconnecting said opera-ting means with said rotatable stretching member for periodic actuation of said operating means at the same phase of each stretching period of said rotatable stretching member so as to sever said joined tapes between each two consecutive zones of said elastic tape.

22. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to each other along their lengths two superimposed tapes; feeding means for pulling into said uniting means along predetermined paths a compression-resistant tape and an elastic tape; a rotatable synchronizer roller arranged in the path of the pulled compression-resistant tape; means for maintaining the compression-resistant tape in non-slidable engagement with said synchronizer roller so that the latter is rotated by said compression-resistant tape during pulling of the same by said feeding means; a rotatable cam-shaped stretching member arranged in the path of said elastic tape non-slidably engaging the same so as to exert during its rotation on said elastic tape a tension periodically varying between a maximum and a minimum and to form in the elastic tape stretched by said periodically varying tension consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape varies between a maximum and a minimum; and driving means operated by said rotatable synchronizer roller and rotating said rotatable cam-shaped stretching member so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with the feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means.

23. Apparatus for manufacturing a bielastic tape structure comprising in combination uniting means for fastening to a compression-resistant tape passing through said uniting means an elastic tape superimposed upon said compression-resistant tape along the length thereof; feeding means for pulling said elastic tape at uniform speed into said uniting means; stretching means arranged in the path of the pulled elastic tape for stretching the same, during pulling by said feeding means, said stretching means including a means for cyclically varying the tension of said stretching means during each of the cycles between a maximum and a, minimum so as to form in said stretched elastic tape consecutive zones in each of which the stretch of the tape ranges between a maximum and a minimum; and driving means operated in synchronism with said feeding means and operating said stretching means so that the same stretches said elastic tape in synchronism with said feeding means pulling both tapes into the uniting means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,022,851 Galligan et al. Dec. 3, 1935 2,022,852 Galligan et a1. Dec. 3, 1935

Patent Citations
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US2022851 *Jul 1, 1935Dec 3, 1935Us Rubber Prod IncCrinkling apparatus
US2022852 *Jul 1, 1935Dec 3, 1935Us Rubber Prod IncMethod of crinkling or puckering elastic material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2962988 *Aug 29, 1957Dec 6, 1960Alba Hosiery Mills IncApparatus for feeding elastic material to sewing machines
US3033140 *Feb 24, 1959May 8, 1962HorneApparatus for automatically winding and/or unwinding web material under uniform tension
US3104633 *Aug 24, 1960Sep 24, 1963Victor NewmanShirred fabric and apparatus for producing same
US3911842 *Nov 8, 1973Oct 14, 1975Zawick GeorgeMethod and apparatus for strip feeding for sewing machines
US4293367 *May 16, 1980Oct 6, 1981Johnson & Johnson Baby Products CompanyApparatus for effecting securement of a transversely moved elastic ribbon to a moving web
US4371417 *Oct 1, 1981Feb 1, 1983Kimberly-Clark CorporationDifferentially stretched elastic
US4475474 *Oct 15, 1982Oct 9, 1984Union Special G.M.B.HMetering device for sewing machines
US4479836 *Oct 17, 1983Oct 30, 1984Johnson & Johnson Baby Products CompanyMethod for effecting securement of alternating stretched and unstretched elastic ribbon to a moving web
US5522329 *Jan 23, 1995Jun 4, 1996Yamato Sewing Machine Mfg. Co, Ltd.Device for selectively feeding bands in a sewing machine
US6056733 *Apr 13, 1995May 2, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Elasticized containment flaps
US20060260738 *Jul 18, 2006Nov 23, 2006Pro-Fit International LimitedInterlining material, process of manufacturing and use thereof
US20100206466 *Aug 19, 2010Paul MorrisInterlining Material, Process of Manufacturing
EP0474255A1 *Sep 6, 1991Mar 11, 1992Ykk CorporationApparatus for sewing fabric pieces to slide fastener chain
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/470.32, 112/152
International ClassificationD05B35/06
Cooperative ClassificationD05B35/06, D05D2303/04, D05D2305/12
European ClassificationD05B35/06