Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2681061 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1954
Filing dateNov 13, 1952
Priority dateNov 13, 1952
Publication numberUS 2681061 A, US 2681061A, US-A-2681061, US2681061 A, US2681061A
InventorsLouis B Modell
Original AssigneeLouis B Modell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Health lamp
US 2681061 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1954 MODELL 2,681,061

HEALTH LAMP Filed Nov. 13, 1952 2 Sheets-Shemv l INVENTOR. Lows B. MODELL June 15, 1954 MODELL 2,681,061

HEALTH LAMP Filed Nov. 13. 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Lours B- MODELL Patented June 15, 1954 UNITED STATES FATENT OFFICE HEALTH LAMP Louis B. Modell, Great Neck, N. Y.

Application November 13, 1952, Serial No. 320,325

5 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in health heat lamps.

More particularly, the present invention proposes the construction of a health heat lamp which may stay on all night or for any other prolonged period without overheating or causing injury to the occupants of the room in which it is being used and which will artificially reproduce atmospheric conditions of a desert in a defined area of a room.

Another object of the present invention proposes iorming a health heat lamp in which the ultraviolet lamp can be completely baffled in the enclosure so that the rays cannot escape and burn the patient.

Still further, the present invention proposes constructing a health heat lamp having a stand or cabinet with a filter covered inlet opening and a motor and fan to draw in air and pass it through an ultraviolet field generated by an ultraviolet lamp, which sterilizes the air, and also serves to cool the tube, the stand or cabinet being connected with a reflector having an infrared element so that the filtered sterile air will pass by the infrared element and the rays and air stream will be directed in a common path.

As a further object, the present invention proposes arranging the filter, fan, ultraviolet lamp and infrared element so as to provide clean,

dry sanitized air continually purged of aerial contaminants and especially beneficial for ill persons, such as those who suffer from sinus trouble, hay fever, asthma and upper respiratory discomforts, to induce restful sleep, particularly during the night when discomforts are most prevalent.

A still further object of the present invention proposes providing a medicant cup or container on the grill of the lamp disposed in front of the infrared heater element so that the infrared rays may help evaporate the medicant and the patient may sleep in a cone of filtered air, mildly medicated if desired, warmed and dehumidified, sterile and sanitized by ultraviolet rays without the creation of harmful nitrous oxide or ozone which is an irritant to asthmatics.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the health lamp of the present invention in position to be directed on a sleeping patient.

Fig. 2 is a front elevational view of the health heat lamp shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view, with parts broken away and shown in section, of the structure illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 4 is a side view, with parts broken away and shown in section, of an infrared element suitable for use in the health heat lamp of the present invention.

Fig. 5 is a perspective View, with part broken away, of the fiberglass filter shown in dotted out line in Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic view of the health I heat lamp of the present invention.

Fig. 7 is a sectional view of the lamp.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary detail view of the inner reflector.

Fig. 9 is a front view of the upper portion of the stand with reflector removed.

Fig. 10 is a rear view of the structure shown in Fig. 9.

Fig. 11 is a front view of the inside of the outer reflector.

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary detail view of an inner reflector clamp.

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary detail view of the clamp shown in Fig. 12 as connecting the inner and outer reflectors.

Fig. 14 is a top plan view of the infrared element.

The health heat lamp has a hollow stand or cabinet l5 shown tubular in shape. It may be made of metal or any other material adapted for such use. The stand [5 has a base l6 adapted to support the stand in upright position.

An ultraviolet, ultra high frequency germicidal lamp ll is mounted in the stand l5, brackets l8 and is being secured to the stand to hold the lamp H and for electrical connections to it. A suitable ballast, such as forty watt ballast 2E5 is provided for the lamp I? in the base It, the ballast being removably secured to the base.

The base 5 has an opening 2| (Fig. 2) into the stand Hi, the opening 2| being substantially the same size as the inside diameter of the stand. A filter 22 of fiberglass or the like is removably secured over the opening 2'! to filter out dust and other foreign particles from air passing through the opening 2|.

An outer reflector 23 is pivotally mounted on the stand id at the top of the stand. An opening 24 is formed in the reflector and a duct 25 connects the hollow stand with the reflector, duct 25 having an opening 26 (Fig. 2) aligning with open-- ing 24 in the reflector. A clamping screw knob 21 engages a threaded stud 28 on the reflector and a slot 29 is provided in the rear side of duct for the stud to pass through so that the screw knob 21 may engage it and bear against the rear side of the duct bridging the slot 29. In this manner, the reflector 23 may be tilted to various angles and secured at those angles. A twenty degree movement, however, has been found to be ample. Protective guard members 30 (Fig. 1) are provided at the face of the reflector.

An infrared or black heat element 3 I is mounted in the reflector to produce invisible, nonactinic radiant energy detectable by its thermal effect. Element 3! consists of a stainless steel sheathing 32 (Fig. 3) over a ceramic liner 33 enclosing a helical coil 34 of Nichrome wire. When hot, the element 3i is nonincandescent and emits rays having wave lengths longer than those of visible light and shorter than those of radio waves, the waves emitted being longer than 7600 Angstroms or angstrom units. The element 3! is mounted in an inner reflector 23 by strip brackets 35 which are removably secured to the reflectors, as by screws 3% (see Fig. 2). The space between the two reflectors permits air passage out the front of the reflector 23 in a substantially annular or cone shaped air stream.

A motor ill is mounted by strap 38 in the casing near the base above the filter 22 and base open- 2i and a fan 39 is secured to the motor shaft to draw air through the filter and base opening and force it up through the stand over the ultraviolet lamp ll and out duct opening 25 to the reflector 23 where it can be directed by the reflector in any direction desired along with the infrared rays and the sterilized air rays from the element 3i and lamp 1?.

A. master switch it (Fig. 2) is provided on the duct 25 to connect and disconnect the entire unit to and from a source of electrical energy (not shown). A switch 4! is also provided for the infrared element 31 and a switch 42 for the ultraviolet and ultra high frequency lamp ll. Motor switch 33 for the motor 37 completes the bank of switch. All switches are connected with their respective units and with the source of electrical energy.

The forced air drawn in the stand or cabinet by the fan 39 and directed over the ultraviolet germicidal lamp it serves to cool the lamp and can be regulated by proper fan speed to keep the lamp at the temperature at which the lamp operates at maximum emciency. Commercially available tubes operating at a 70 maximum efficiency temperature can be used in the health lamp of the present invention with their best results. The ultra, high frequency and the ultraviolet waves will destroy bacteria, germs and other harmful microorganisms which get through the filter 22.

Preferably, ultraviolet lamp [l is one adapted to emit radiant (nonluminous) energy in waves centering around the rang of from 3000 down to 1850 Angstroms or angstrom units and one which produces little or no ozone. The inside of the stand of cabinet i5 adjacent the lamp l! is sprayed with a specular aluminum lining for a high reflection factor and intensification of the rays.

A medicant or deodorant holding cup 44 may be removably secured to the center of grill members Eli? as shown in the first three figures. Preferably the cup is of copper for ready heat evaporation 4 of the contents by the infrared heater to disperse the contents into the air stream.

Fig. 1 shows the lamp as used at night on a patient alongside of bed 46.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

l. A health heat lamp comprising a hollow stand and a base for the stand, an ultraviolet lamp, means to mount the lamp in the stand, said base having an opening into the stand, an outer reflector pivotally mounted on the stand, an inner reflector mounted within said outer reflector and spaced therefrom to provide an air channel therebetween, an infrared element mounted in the inner reflector, a motor and fan in the stand to draw air into the stand and force it through the rays of the lamp, said stand and outer reflector having aligned openings for air to enter the air channel and be directed past the infrared element.

2. A health heat lamp comprising a hollow stand and a base for the stand, an ultraviolet lamp, means to mount the lamp in the stand, said base having an opening into the stand, a filter removably secured over the base opening, an outer reflector pivotally mounted on the stand, an inner reflector mounted within said outer reflector and spaced therefrom to provide an annular air channel therebetween, an infrared element mounted in the inner reflector, a motor and fan in the stand to draw air into the stand through the filter and force it through the rays of the lamp, said stand and reflector having aligned openings so that the filtered and sterilized air will enter the air channel and be directed past the infrared element. said infrared element being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves larger than 7600 Angstroms and said ultraviolet lamp being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves centering around the range of from 3000 down to 1850 Angstroms.

3. A health heat lamp comprising a hollow stand and a base for the stand, an ultraviolet lamp, means to mount the lamp in the stand, said base having an opening into the stand, a filter removably secured over the base opening, an outer reflector pivotally mounted on the stand, an inner reflector mounted within said outer reflector and spaced therefrom to provide an annular air channel therebetween, an infrared element mounted in the inner reflector, a motor and fan in the stand to draw air into the stand through the filter and force it through the rays of the lamp, said stand and reflector having aligned openings so that the filtered and sterilized air will enter the air channel and be directed past the infrared element, said infrared element being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves larger than 7600 Angstroms and said ultraviolet lamp being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves centering around the range of from 3000 down to 1850 Angstroms, ballast disposed in the base for the ultraviolet lamp, switches for the lamp, infrared element and motor, means to connect the lamp, element and motor with the switches and means to connect the switches with a source of electrical energy.

4. A health heat lamp comprising a hollow stand and a base for the stand, an ultraviolet lamp, means to mount the lamp in the stand, said base having an opening into the stand, a filter removahly secured over the base opening, an outer reflector pivotally mounted on the stand, an inner reflector mounted within said outer reflector and spaced therefrom to provide an annular air channel therebetween, an infrared element mounted in the inner reflector, a motor and fan in the stand to draw air into the stand through the filter and force it through the rays of the lamp, said stand and reflector having aligned openings so that the filtered and sterilized air will enter the air channel and be directed past the infrared element, said infrared element being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves larger than 7600 Angstroms and said ultraviolet lamp being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves centering around the range of from 3000 down to 1350 Angstroms, ballast disposed in the base for the ultraviolet lamp, switches for the lamp, infrared element and motor, means to connect the lamp, element and motor with the switches and means to connect the switches with a source of electrical energy, said infrared element having a stainless steel sheathing and a ceramic liner with a helical coil of Nichrome wire enclosed therein.

5. A health heat lamp comprising a hollow stand and a base for the stand, an ultraviolet lamp, means to mount the lamp in the stand, said base having an opening into the stand, a filter removably secured over the base opening, an outer reflector pivotally mounted on the stand, an inner reflector mounted within said outer reflector and spaced therefrom to provide an annular air channel therebetween, an infrared element mounted in the inner reflector, a motor and fan in the stand to draw air into the stand through the filter and force it through the rays of the lamp, said stand and reflector having aligned openings so that the filtered and sterilized air will enter the air channel and be directed past the infrared element, said infrared element being adapted to emit radiant energy in Waves larger than 7600 Angstroms and said ultraviolet lamp being adapted to emit radiant energy in waves centering around the range of from 3000 down to 1850 Angstroms, ballast disposed in the base for the ultraviolet lamp, switches for the lamp, infrared element and motor, means to connect the lamp, element and motor with the switches and means to connect the switches with source of electrical energy, said infrared element having a stainless steel sheathing and a ceramic liner with a helical coil. of Nichrome wire enclosed therein, said ultraviolet lamp being an ultra high frequency tube.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,881,262 Conradty Oct. 4, 1932 2,347,954 Kiely May 2, 1944 2,354,817 Law Aug. 1, 1944 2,359,057 Skinner Sept. 26, 1944 2,517,428 Harris Aug. 1, 1950 2,560,652 Landauer July 17, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1881262 *Nov 18, 1930Oct 4, 1932Ottmar ConradtyArc lamp
US2347954 *Aug 13, 1941May 2, 1944Kiely Daniel JAir sterilizing apparatus
US2354817 *Jan 26, 1942Aug 1, 1944Walter E LawSterilizer
US2359057 *Feb 28, 1942Sep 26, 1944Donald Skinner GeorgeHeating and ventilating system
US2517428 *May 2, 1947Aug 1, 1950Harris Gordon DAir conditioning unit
US2560652 *Dec 20, 1947Jul 17, 1951Fred LandauerLamp for therapeutic treatments
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3059090 *Dec 1, 1960Oct 16, 1962Westinghouse Electric CorpSpace heater
US3107863 *Oct 31, 1960Oct 22, 1963Reginald RobbinsAir directing isolation apparatus
US3126003 *Jul 2, 1962Mar 24, 1964 Filter
US3151929 *Feb 13, 1961Oct 6, 1964Union Carbide CorpAseptic air isolation apparatus
US3174819 *Jun 28, 1962Mar 23, 1965Merrick Medicine CompanyFluid purifying apparatus
US3335518 *Jul 11, 1966Aug 15, 1967Northern Gas Products CompanyCrop growth improvement by means of propane actuated thermopile and insecticide volatilizer
US3518046 *Sep 16, 1968Jun 30, 1970Cicirello Daniel JMethod and apparatus for the destruction of airborne microorganisms within a room
US3702526 *Apr 15, 1969Nov 14, 1972Berckheim Graf VonAir ionization and cleaning arrangement
US4045680 *Jun 28, 1976Aug 30, 1977Alois LoherShielding arrangement for a rod shaped uv radiator
US4621310 *Jul 18, 1985Nov 4, 1986Richard KeatingHeating luminaire protector
US5547635 *Nov 10, 1993Aug 20, 1996Duthie, Jr.; Robert E.Exposure of microorganism to ultraviolet radiation and metal oxide
US6245010May 20, 1999Jun 12, 2001Datex-Ohmeda, Inc.Radiant heater for infant warmers
US6308008 *Jun 25, 1998Oct 23, 2001Kanthal AbIR-source with helically shaped heating element
US6718128 *Jun 26, 2001Apr 6, 2004Fisher & Paykel Healthcare LimitedRadiant warmer with distance determination between heater and patient
US6735379Aug 9, 2002May 11, 2004Fisher & Paykel Healthcare LimitedEnergy sensor
WO1990007358A1 *Dec 21, 1989Jul 12, 1990Bernhard PfeiferInfrared radiator for application of hyperthermia in human medicine
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/20, 392/408, 392/360, 607/96, 250/495.1, 392/426, 250/504.00R, 422/121
International ClassificationA61N5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/06
European ClassificationA61N5/06