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Publication numberUS2681142 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1954
Filing dateNov 8, 1950
Priority dateNov 8, 1950
Publication numberUS 2681142 A, US 2681142A, US-A-2681142, US2681142 A, US2681142A
InventorsHarold L Cohen
Original AssigneeHarold L Cohen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealed cushioning container
US 2681142 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1954 H. COHEN SEALED CUSHIONING CONTAINER 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Nov. 8, 1.950

June 15, 1954 H, L, COHEN 2,681,142

SEALED CUSHIONING CONTAINER F'iled NOV. 8. 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 j@ 4 /6- /fa /2 I3 w .Bill

June l5, 1954 H. 1 COHEN SEALED CUSHIONING CONTAINER 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 F'iled Nov. 8, 1950 ,qu im@ W e. t WZ f faro/d y M Patented June 15, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OF FICE SEALED V4CU SHICNIN G CONTAINER Harold L. Cohen, Chicago, Ill.

I'Application November 8, 1950, Serial'No.194',678

(Cl. 20G-46) This invention-relates to a sealing, cushioning container and hasifor one objectto provide a container which is light, strong and substantially airtight.

Another object is to provide a container Vwith variable internal vair pressure.

Another object is'to provide a container which will seal the object or yobjects carried therein from the atmosphere.

Another object is to provide a convenient, practical container in which delicate instruments or other easily damageable Aobjects maybe safely packaged and transported by ordinary shipping means.

Another ,object is to provide a 'container in which `delicate objects may be lpneumatically cushioned.

Another object is to provide a hard-shelled container in which delicate objects can be suspended flexibly in relation to and'out of contact with the container shell.

Other objects will appear from time to time in the specification and claims.

This invention is illustrated more or -less ldiagrammatically in the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the device showing in dotted lines Va watch -in yposition forshipment;

Figure 2 is a vertical section taken at line 2 2 of Figure l;

`Figure 3 is an exploded vertical section showing the upper and lower portions of the device separated and .with some parts broken away and showing thelockingmeans before the application .thereof to said .upper .and lower portions;

Figure 4 isa section of a ymodified form;

Figure 5 is a section taken .at line 5-5 of Figure 4;

vFigure 6 is a sectional view generally similar to VFigure 2 and showing a modified form of diaphragm;

Figure 7 is a section illustrating the diaphragm o'f Figure 6 separated from the housing structure;

Figure 8 is a section illustrating a modified form of diaphragm with a thickened center; and

Figure 9 isa fragmentary sectionillustrating a modified means for securing two housing or shell members together.

Figure 1G is a section, similaito Figure 2, showing a modified form.

Like parts are indicated by like characters Athroughout the specication and the drawings.

i represents a shell which, for convenience herein, will be referred to as an upper shell and 2 represents a second shell similarly referred to herein as a lower shell. Each of the shells 'i vand z 2 isprovided with 'an'outwardlyextendin'g'circumferential ilip or 'flange -rwhich is .designated genera11y'3, and which ispreferably integralwith 'its'respective shell. Across'the mouth ofeach shell is positioned a resilient diaphragm 4 vwhich issecured at its 'periphery Ato Ythe inner surface 5 ofthe flange -3. In practice, the diaphragm may be secured to all or any sufcient portion of this surface or evento theinner circumference of the shells i and 2. vExperience has indicated, however, that the diaphragm ismost'effectively secured by being caused to adhere to'all, or substantiaily all, of the 'innersurface v5 of thevlange 3, or by being 'made to adhereialso to the edge 6 kor outer surface 1,\or*both, of the 'anges VThe diaphragm il lmaybe secured to the 'iiange by any means which will 4provide a substantially airtight seal between the diaphragm and -fthe shell. One practical and convenient means is -a suitable `glue or liquid cement.

The diaphragm vl may be put lin 'place )with a high degree oftautness, asshown in the lower shell 2 in Figure' 3,01'V relatively loosely, as shown by-dotted .lines at -8 :in 5the upper -shellin Figure 3, depending upon the-degree-of tensionfdesired- -Oneofthe advantages of thisinventionis that in addition to the cushioningeffect provided by the resilient diaphragms, Aair pressure rmay also be used to dampen the movements -of the object being carried in the container. As beforeestated, the diaphragms maybe mounted-soas to provide a substantially airtight lseal between each `dia-- phragm and -its Vrespective shell. 1n 'addition to this, the cushioning is further aided bythe rm joining together of` the upper and lower shells as shown Ain Figure 2. Each shell thus, in -the lcompleted assembly, becomes an airtight *compartment andthe air contained between each diaphragm and the inner walls of -its respective container will resist lany fluctuations -of the diaphragms and of Athe vobject vheld therebetween. In order toeifect controlof the amount of vibration allowed by means |`of varying air pressure,

a valve!) is provided ineach shell. .Through 'each valve the 'amount of air inthe respective shells may be increased or'decreased. If, Yfor example, it is desired to keep ata minimum the movement ofthe object being transported, the dia- ,phragms 4 will be .positioned rwith as .much tension as possible and 'a high lvolume of air will be pumped or otherwise introduced through the valves r9 into leach rshell.

The Vshape of the containerlshown in the drawings is believed to loe-especially convenient and practical nbut many Adiierent shapes could be used so long -as what arehreferred -to hereinas the upper and lower portions could be made to fit together snugly and thus be made to prevent the entry of air between the two diaphragms.

So far as the juxtaposition of the two diaphragms in operative position is concerned, it may also be desired to have them spaced apart even though each may be taut. This would be the case if bulk objects or any other object which extends vertically to a degree which might cause the puncturing of diaphragms initially abutting each other were to be carried. ln such cases any suitable spacing means or gasket may be placed between the circumierences of the upper and lower portions and the locking means adjusted accordingly.

'I'he diaphragms having been properly adjusted, the object to be carried will be placed upon the diaphragm of the lower shell 2, and preferably in the center thereof. The upper shell will then be positioned as shown in Figure 2 and the diaphragms will conform themselves in shape to the general configuration of the object between them. For illustrative purposes a watch has been shown-in Figure 1 in plan and in Figure 2 in section.

Any suitable locking or clamping means may be used to secure the two shells together in such manner that the circumferences of the respective mouths thereof abut each other. One practical and convenient locking means, a ilegible partial ring I 0, grooved in its inner circumference, which might be formed of metal or plastic and which lits snugly over the flanges 3, is shown in Figure 2. Other means, in fact any means, which will elect a tight juncture of the two shells might be usedfor example, screws or bolts. Since precise register is desired between the flanges when they are fitted together, the form shown in the drawings is believed to be most practical-that is, a form in which the circumference of the mouth of each shell does not deviate from a common plane. Undulating, notched, etc., surfaces might be used, but the problem of register would be greater in such cases rthan in the form shown in the drawings.

After the locking means is in operative position, the device is ready to use, providing the air pressure in the shells is as desired. If the amount of roughness, bumpiness or turbulence to be encountered is expected to be small or if the object is not easily subject to damage, it may be that the pressure of the existing atmosphere will be satisfactory and if so, one or both of the valves 9. may be left open; or one or both may be closed with no air having been added. For some circumstances a form of the invention might be used which has no valves and in which there is no opening in the shells or in which either or both of the shells may have a small air vent as shown at II in Figure 10. If these vents are used, the air pressure within the shells will remain equal to the pressure in the surrounding free atmosphere. This use of the device would be especially desirable if great changes in the outer atmosphere, relative to pressure within the container, were considered harmful. If roughness or turbulence is anticipated, a form containing no vents but possessing valves will be used and additional air may be introduced into either or both of the shells through the proper valve or valves.

The shells may be formed of any substance which is suciently strong to withstand the shocks to be encountered and which will not permit air to transpire through it. Either one or both of the shells may be made of light, strong metal. One convenient form is that in which the lower shell 2 is formed of metal and the upper shell I formed of a transparent plastic, such as Plexiglas. This form has the advantage of allowing the shape and position of the object being carried to be seen by those who handle or are otherwise responsible for the container and its contents. For even if neither diaphragm were transparent, either diaphragm, if visible, would be generally shaped or molded to the form of the object carried by its contact with that object.

In the modined form of Figures 4 and 5, instead of the double shell shown in the earlier figures, a single main shell member I2 is used. This shell is provided with an internal annular ange I3 against which a diaphragm l is positioned and upon which the diaphragm is held seated by a ring I5 which, as shown, is threaded to engage corresponding threading I5 on the interior of the shell I2. The shell I2 may be closed by a fiat, or generally at, cover member II, which is held in place by screws i8, or other- Wise. I9 is a gasket or sealing means between the cover I1 and the portion of the shell I2 which it contacts. The devices of the sort shown in Figures 4 and 5 may include two diaphragms, but, as shown, only a single diaphragm i4 is used.

A variety of articles, indicated in dotted lines as at 20, may be placed upon the diaphragm I4 when the latter is in a more or less horizontal position, and the articles are covered by a layer of flexible material, natural or synthetic, such as latex or some plastic. This is the material indicated as at ZI in Figures 4 and 5. Although the material is shown in strictly circular pattern in Figure 5, it is to be understood that it might be of any pattern or plan and may be applied merely by spraying the latex or other material over the article so that it holds the article to the diaphragm I4. It may form a sealing contact to seal the article, or it may merely act as a holding means to hold the article to the diaphragm.

The shell I2 is provided with a check valve 22 and the cover l1 is provided with a check valve 23. One or both of these may be omitted. When present, they are useful to permit iluid under pressure to be forced into the shell on either side of the diaphragm.

The modified form of Figure 6 is substantially the same as that of Figure 2, except that the diaphragms diier. As shown in Figure 6, two diaphragme 24 are in place, and each diaphragm is provided with a thickened peripheral portion 25. When the diaphragms are put in place about the shell or housing members I and 2 they are merely folded or placed over the peripheral flange 3 and are sprung into place, as

shown in Figure 6. Their elasticity holds them in that position, and when the device is then fastened together by the member IIJ, the parts assume the position and arrangement shown in Figure 6.

In Figure 8 the diaphragm is generally like that shown in Figure 7. However, it comprises va web or diaphragm portion 2S thickened at or near its center, as at 2l, and provided with a thickened peripheral portion 2S. The thickening, as shown in Figure 8, is progressive, increasing from a point away from the center uniformly toward the center. The diaphragm may take different form, or the thickening may be in any proportion or sequence. It is frequently useful to have a diaphragm without uniformity in thickness from edge to edge.

La-'esmas 'ture `*is substantially that 'o'f lFigures L1` and A'iz-ex- Vvcept"th'atins'tead of tfastening means -IVthe-cir 'cumferential ylips At! are held together by screws '29. I'Obviously, 1bdltsor rivets,or other ffasteners,

'would' be the gener-al `-equivalents Iof-lthe screws '29. Certain yconditions make this `positive lfastening desirable Where'substant'ial pressures are to be developed and maintained withinone portion or another of 'fthe housing .this type of positive fastening .is preferable.

In the several 'forms of 'the invention illustrated a relatively rigid housing or shell is provided,

"and a-rela'ti-vel-y flexible diaphragm is nsuspended vunder tension within -the farea --enclosed yby `the housing. Thus, the-diaphragm and whatever is supported `by -itare protected from contact with fobjects outside of the'shell. The diaphragm is vprotected from 'breaking andthe objects carried Eby the diaphragm are cushioned and protected from 'shock by theelasticity and vilexibilityof the diaphragm. If the diaphragm lis arranged in a housingor shell which has no valves, such'as the valves 9 or 23, pressure 'will be developed within the shell when the shell parts are joined together, andan article is supported by the diaphragm. Thus, if no compressionis added to the space enclosedby the'sh'ells, the only compressive effect present'is that vdue l'to 'the fact that the object which is supported upon a diaphragm or between diaphragms displaces its own volume of air and, hence, creates some compression. For some purposes this is suiiicient. For some purposes the vents II will be provided in one or more of the shell housing members. The vents, of course, prevent the creation of any compression, since they permit equalization of pressure between the space within the shell and the space outside of the shell. Ordinarily, the vents will not be present if the valves 9 are used. The valves 9 find their primary use as inlets for pressure fluid after the two shell parts have been joined together, and since they open freely inwardly in response to pressure and are seated in response to pressure within, they permit pressure to be forced into the space within the shell and prevent its escape. Therefore, the vents II would not normally be present in a shell which is equipped with the valves 9 or their equivalent.

Sometimes it is desirable to equip one shell; for example, the shell I, with a valve 9 and to have no vent in it and to equip the shell 2 with a vent and to have no valve in it. In this arrangement pressure will be introduced through the valve a inside the shell portion I, and the air within the shell portion 2 will be somewhat displaced through the vent I I and the diaphragm will be distorted or bowed outwardly in the direction of the shell portion 2. This distortion or stretching will increase the tension of the diaphragm and will thus tend to reduce the possible amplitude of vibration of the diaphragm under the effect of shock on the housing or shell portion I or 2.

If only a single diaphragm is used it will be impervious, or substantially impervious, to air. If two diaphragms are used, vas shown in Figures 2, 6 and 9, at least one will be impervious to the air and the other may not be. Frequently, of course, both will be impervious and substantially identical in size, shape and in the material of which they are made.

The invention is not limited to any particular shape of shell or housing, nor to any particular v style, shape or material for the diaphragm, nor

to the meansof securing the diaphragm Pint-place.

Generally, the shell will be relatively lrigid,ail-

'though it may have-some 'ilexibility,andfthe diaphragm, when the partsV are=assernbled in-'loa'dcarrying position, will be itaut and preferably will be subjected to pressure during use. The pressure may be utilized on both sides of the dia- `phragin or it may lue-unequal. It is unequal the diaphragm will tend to be deformed. 'If it Lis-equal the diaphragm lwill tend to lbe retained in 4-flat position. AThe means for -securing `Athe diaphragms together; for example, Ythe rpart 'lfll 'or the screws 29, or any other fsuitablefastening means, will vbe selected in accordance with particular conditions 'of use. -If high-compression isto be used, obviously the spring fastening means -i of Figures 1, 2, 3,and 6 would not be suitable, and a more vpositive fasteningmeans, such as that shown in Figures 4 and 9, is necessary.

Although I have vvshown yan operativer form of my invention, it Iwill be recognized that -many vchanges 'in the form,shape-and arrangement 'of parts can be made without departing `frorn'lthe spirit of the invention, land -my showing is, vtherevlfore, to lbe taken -asfin a sense, diagrammatic.

I-claim:

1. In a container, concave matingportions, each of the said portions being relatively "rigid Yand being `formed lof material vimpervious to the passage of air therethrough; a resilient diaphragm positioned across the mouth of each of said portions under tension, said diaphragms being impervious to the passage of air therethrough, each of said diaphragms being secured to the circumference of the mouth of its respective portion so as to form a substantially airtight seal therein, and locking means joining said portions together in register at the circumferences of the respective mouths thereof, the tension of the said diaphragms being such as to permit the positioning therebetween of an object to be carried in the container.

2. In a container, concave mating portions, each of the said portions being relatively rigid and being formed of material impervious to the passage of air therethrough; a resilient diaphragm positioned across the mouth of each of said portions under tension; a flange extending outwardly from the circumference of the mouth of each of said portions, each of said diaphragms being secured to the circumference of its respective portion; and locking means joining said anges in register, said locking means comprising a flexible partial ring, grooved in its inner circumference and positioned snugly over the said flanges; the tension of the said diaphragms being such as to permit the positioning therebetween of an object to be carried in the container.

3. In a container, concave mating portions, each of the said portions being relatively rigid and being formed of material impervious to the passage of air therethrough; a resilient diaphragm positioned across the mouth of each of said portions under tension, said diaphragms being impervious to the passage of air therethrough, each of said diaphragms being secured to the circumference of the mouth of its respective portion so as to form a substantially airtight seal therein; a. valve positioned in the wall of one of said portions, adapted to permit the control of the air pressure therein; and locking means joining said.

7 therebetween of an object to be carried in the container.

4. In a container, concave mating portions, each .of the said portions being relatively rigid and being formed of material impervious to the passage of air therethrough; a resilient diaphragm positioned across the mouth of each of said portions under tension, said diaphragme being impervious to the passage of air therethrough, each of said diaphragms being secured to the circum- -ference of the mouth of its respective portion so as to form a substantially airtight seal therein; a

-valve positioned in the Wall of each of said portions, adapted to permit the control of the air pressure therein; and locking means joining said portions in register, the tension of said diaphragms being such as to permit the positioning therebetween of an object to be carried in the container.

5. In a container, concave mating portions, each of the said portions being relatively rigid and being formed of material impervious to the passage of air therethrough; a resilient diaphragm positioned across the mouth of each of Said portions under tension, said diaphragms being impervious to the passage of air therethrough, each of said diaphragms being secured to the circumference of the mouth of its respective portion so as to form a substantially airtight seal therein;

an air vent positioned in the Wall of each of said portions, adapted to permit the control of the air pressure therein; and locking means joining said upper portion and said lower portion together in rregister at the circumferences of the respective mouths thereof, the tension of the said diafphragms being such as to permit the positioning therebetween of an object to be carried in the container.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 253,683 Catterall Feb. 14, 1882 1,043,412 Faunce Nov. 5, 1912 1,449,940 Hackney Mar. 27, 1923 1,691,128 Redmond Nov. 13, 1928 1,827,322 Lindermann Oct. 13, 1931 2,134,908 Copeman Nov. 1, 1938 2,242,582 Jencick May 20, 1941 2,438,089 Carson Mar. 16, 1948 2,496,711 Goddard Feb. 7, 1950 2,501,570 Larsen Mar. 21, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 26,505 Great Britain May 24, 1906 269,263 Great Britain Apr. 20, 1927 475,299 Great Britain Nov. 17, 1937

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/522, 206/301, 220/530, 206/583, 217/35, 220/920, 206/205, 206/592, 220/4.25
International ClassificationB65D45/30, B65D81/07
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/075, Y10S220/92, B65D45/30
European ClassificationB65D81/07A, B65D45/30