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Publication numberUS2681702 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1954
Filing dateMar 22, 1949
Priority dateMar 22, 1949
Publication numberUS 2681702 A, US 2681702A, US-A-2681702, US2681702 A, US2681702A
InventorsKuenn William Whitney, Elmer F Jones
Original AssigneeOwens Corning Fiberglass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of packaging insulating strips
US 2681702 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 22, 1954 w. w. KUENN EI'AL 2,681,702

METHOD OF PACKAGING INSULATING STRIPS Filed March 22, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet Jl ATTYS- June 22, 1954 w. w. KUEV'NN ETAL 2,531,702

METHOD OF PACKAGING INSULATING STRIPS Fil ed March 22, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 w Am.

ATTYS- June 22, 1954 w. w. KUENN ETAL 2,681,702

I METHOD OF PACKAGING INSULATING STRIPS Filed March 22, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 .W Q M ATTYSZ Patented June 22, 1954 METHOD OF PACKAGING INSULATING STRIPS William Whitney Kuenn, Toledo, and Elmer F.

Jones, Granville, Ohio, assignors to Owens- Corning Fibcrglas Cor corporation of Delaware poration, Toledo, Ohio, a

Application March 22, 1949, Serial No. 82,854

7 Claims. (01. 164-17) This invention relates to insulating bats or units and to the process and apparatus for assembling them and more particularly to bats packaged in a manner whereby one or more components making up the packaged units may be readily separated from the package without the use of tools.

At the present time, in the manufacture and packaging of fibrous bats or units formed of mineral fibers, as for example, glass fibers, the bats being of a character especially adapted or used for thermal and sound insulation, it is the practice of packaging groups of bats by supplying a sheet of paper beneath a mat of fluffy fibrous insulating material, severing the fibrous mat into bats and periodically severing the paper backing sheet whereby several bats carried on a single sheet of paper form a package for shipment and this package may be laid flat in a carton or rolled or otherwise prepared prior to shipment or storage. In the installation of the bats in the proclucts in which the insulating bats may be used as, for example, in buildings, cooking ranges, refrigerators, refrigerator cars, water heaters and the like, the person making the installation unrolls the package and selects therefrom the required bat of the desired dimension. The rolls are desirably of considerable size in the interest of economical handling in transportation but such rolls are dinicult to manipulate by the person making the installation. Where several sizes of bats are included in one roll, handling of an entire roll has been found especially time consuming if only bats of one size may be desired for instant application. After use of the bats of desired size, the remainder must be rerolled and stored. This procedure often results in damage to the remaining bats of the package due to the excessive hanoiling.

'The present invention resides in the provision of an improved package and in the method and apparatus for packaging groups of insulating bats to facilitate their installation in places of use.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved package of insulating bats wherein a packaging sheet associated with the bats is weakcned in linear zonesto facilitate the separation of bat sections from the package without dis turbing or disrupting the remainder of the package.

Another object of the invention is the provision of means for mechanically weakening a packaging sheet as byperforating orscoring the sheet in zones in registration with the spaces between adjacent bats or insulating sections.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for perforating or weakening a backing sheet for insulating bats at the time of formation of a package composed of the backing sheet and groups of bat sections.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an apparatus for forming a plurality of rows of perforations or scored zones in a packaging sheet for insulating bats in which the sheet perforating or scoring means are adjustable for different widths of bats and for aligning the perforations or linear scoring with the spaces or separations between adjacent bat sections.

Further objects and advantages are within the scope of this invention such as relate to the arrangement, operation and function of the related elements of the structure, to various details of construction and to combinations of parts, elements per se, and to economies of manufacture and numerous other features as will be apparent from a consideration of the specification and drawing of a form of the invention, which may be preferred, in which:

Figure 1 is a semi-diagrammatic view of an apparatus usable for forming and packaging insulating bats illustrating a form of our invention incorporated therein;

Figure 2 is a sectional View through the apparatus shown in Figure 1, the view being taken substantially on the line 2-2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an end elevational view of the structure shown in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a sectional view showing one of the sheet perforating units, the view being taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Figure 2;

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken substantially on the line 5- of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is a detail sectional view taken substantially en the line 6--6 of Figure 5;

Figure '7 is a front elevational view of one of the perforating units;

Figure 8 is a rear elevational view of the perforating unit shown in Figure '7;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary elevational view showing another form of device for weakening the backing or packaging sheet in linear zones;

Figure 10 is a detail sectional view taken substantially on the line H2H3 of Figure 9;

Figure 11 is a detail sectional view taken substantially on the line H-II of Figure 4; and

Figure 12 is an isometric view of the package of insulating bats.

While we have illustrated the method and arrangement of our invention as particularly adapted and used for processing and packaging groups of insulating bats with a backing sheet weakened in particular zones for purposes of dismemberment, it is to be understood that we contemplate the utilization of our invention wherever the same may be found to be applicable.

In the production of bats of fibrous material such as wood fiber, cotton fiber, shredded paper, mineral wool made from rock, slag or glass, and the like, the fiber or other constituent material is collected into a continuous mat by being blown or otherwise deposited upon a conveyor. The mat of material is then cut into bats or units of the desired size, usually by slitting the mat into two or more strips and cutting the strips transversely to form the bats.

The present invention is partciularly usable in the formation and. packaging of bats or insulating units derived from glass reduced or transformed to'a relatively fine fibrous state, although it is to be understood that the invention is applicable to the manufacture and packaging of bats of other materials. In Figure 1 there is illustrated an arrangement of manufacturing or forming bats of glassfiber, the fibers being produced by flowing streams of molten glass from the forehearth it of a glass melting furnace indicated at H and through the use of suitable blowers E2 the streams of molten glass are attenuated into relatively fine fibers as they pass through a conduit or chamber l4 to a conveyor [5 upon which the fibers are deposited to form a mat It. The mat i6 is transferred to a second conveyor I'i and then to a third conveyor it, the conveyors being arranged in end-to-end relationship so as to advance or move the fibrous mat continuously in a general direction of its length. The conveyors [5, ill and it are driven by a suitable means (not shown). Between the conveyors H and it a continuous web so of sheet material is directed on to the conveyor 58 and into juxtaposition with the under side of the mat H6. The sheet material most commonly used for a web or backing sheet is a kraft paper but other suitable materials may be employed as backing or packaging sheets for the bats. The web of sheet material may be of a width approximately that of the mat or it may be provided enough wider than the mat to be folded over the outer edges of the group of bats in the finished package.

The web 2?; of sheet material is taken from a supply roll 21 and after moving through a mecha: nism for weakening the sheet in certain zones by perforating or scoring in a manner and by means hereinafter described, passes onto conveyor it thus providing a backing and packaging sheet for the mat it as it passes through the bat forming mechanism.

The mat it is generally fabricated into a strip of a width greater than the width normally used for insulation applications and means are provided for severing or slitting the mat 16 lengthwise of its movement to provide'individual strips of bat material of the desired widths. To this end there is provided a transversely disposed arbor or shaft 2 upon which is mounted one or more rotary saws 25 which are rotated by suitable means (not shown). The saws 25 are provided with peripheral teeth of a shape and character to-sever the fibers of the mat It as the latter is advanced by the conveyor It. The number of saw employed and their lateral spacing is such as to sever or separate the mat 56- into the desired number of strips of the required width incident to their particular application for insulating purposes.

Means are also provided for severing the strips of mat transversely to form bats of a particular or desired length and for transversely severing the backing sheet 28 from the supply to separate a series of severed sections or bats from the mat l6. Preferably the arrangement comprises a frame 21 upon which is journaled a transversely extending shaft 28 equipped with crank arms 29 connected by pitmans 30 with a transversely extending shear or cutting knife iii. The knife 3| is adapted for cooperation With a stationary shear blade 32 disposed beneath the moving mat i6 and the backing sheet 20. The conveyor 13 being of the flexible endless belt type passes around pairs of rolls Q34 and 35 disposed adjacent the stationary shear 32 so as to permit unobstructed operation of the movbale shear 3 i, The conveyor belt it takes over the rolls 3i and 38, one of which is driven by suitable means (not shown).

In the apparatus illustrated in Figure l, the backing sheet 20 is conveyed over the roller 31 and upper flight of the conveyor [8, the backing sheet underlying the mat it during its period of travel with the conveyor it. The shearing knife Si is arranged to be actuated or operated in a manner (not shown) for periodically shearing bats or units 43 from the longitudinally severed strips of insulating material, the shearing device being arranged to out the mat per so without severing the backing sheet until the number of bats or units selected to form a package have been cut from the mat iii. The actuating mechanism for the movable shear 3! is arranged so that at the time the last row of bats 0f the predetermined group are cut from the mat, the backing sheet 29 is also severed, the resulting length of backing sheet corresponding to the aggregate length of the bats combined into a single group or package P as shown in Figure 12. The backing sheet 29 is maintained in coextensive relation with the severed bats, the bats and backing sheet being rolled in a convolute formation resulting in a substantially cylindrical assemblage or package shown in Figures 1 and 12.

The present invention includes an improvement in the package formed in the above described manner and to a method and apparatus of performing operations upon the backing sheet whereby a workman, in installing individual bats in a place of ultimate use, may readily dismemberor separate one or more of the rolled groups of bats from the remainder of the package without the use of tools. Our invention is inclusive of means for performing operations upon the backing sheet in a manner to weaken, score or mutilate the sheet in linear zones which in the finished package will be in alignment with the separations between the strips or longitudinal groups of bats. The weakening of the backing sheet may be accomplished by suitable means such as intermittentl mutilating or severing the paper, by partially crushing the paper fiber or scoring the paper through the use of a scoring wheel or by perforating the paper through the use of a perforating wheel.

We have illustrated the preferred arrangement of our invention as embodying a sheet perforating means to effect a weakening of the paper in linear zones whereby one or more of a group of bats and the adjacent backing sheet sections may be broken away or severed from the rolled package along the perforate lines. The perforating or sheet weakening device illustrated in detail in Figures 2 through 8 is inclusive of a pair of laterally spaced end frames 44 and 45 respectively disposed adjacent the ends of and beneath 5. theconveycr supporting roll 31. The end frames are joined together by means of members or bars 46, 4 1 and 5I which are welded, bolted or otherwiserigidly secured-to the end frames.

A transversely extending shaft or rod 49 is mounted at its extremities in suitable supports 50 carried by the end frames. The .shaft 49 is adapted tosuppo-rt one or more perforating units or mechanisms for perforating or weakening the. backing sheet 20. As illustrated in Figure .2, there are. four shearing cutters or saws 25 for shearing the mat [6 into five longitudinally extendingpcoextensively disposed strips of insulating material designated at 52, 53, 5'4, and 55. Arranged for cooperation with the saws are four perforatin units 4|, 4|, 42 and 42, each disposed in alignment with a shearing saw .25. As the perforating units are of substantially identicalxconstruction, a description of one is believed sufficient for the present purposes.

One of the perforating units is illustrated in Figures 3 through 8 and includes a member 59 of hollow formation which may be formed by welding a pair of plates to suitable spacing portions. The side walls of member 59 are pro-- vided with slots H to accommodate a stub shaft 62. upon which isjournaled a perforating wheel 63 having a serrated periphery. Slidably disposed in the slot BI formed in the walls of member 59 is a plunger 64 of U-shaped configuration, the extremities of the leg portions thereof engaging the shaft 62 to maintain the latter in contact with the end walls of the slots 6i so as to maintain the perforating wheel normally in a predetermined position with respect to the member 59.

As shown in Figure 6, the upper end of member '64 is formed with a kerf to accommodate one end of a plate spring 55 for resiliently urging member 64 toward the shaft 62. The other end of the spring 65 is anchored to an abutment 66 carried by forwardly projecting portions 61 of member .59. The pressure exerted by spring 65 upon the plunger may be regulated by adjusting the position of screw 68 which is received in a threaded bore formed in member 59. Means are provided for pivotally supporting member 59 upon the shaft 49 including a block 10 bored to be s-lidably received on shaft 49. Welded or otherwise secured to the block 19 is a tang TI formed with angularly arranged upper and lowed edge portions. The member 59 is formed with a surface 12 arranged to coincide with the lower edge of the tang H as shown in Figure 4. The upper edge of tang II is adapted to be engaged bya gib element. 1:3 which is slotted to accommodate a retaining pin 74. carried by member '59. The slot in the gib orslement 13 is considerably larger than the diameter of the pin 14 so as to facilitate adjustment ofelement 13 into clamping engagement with the tang II, A. screw I5 carried by member 59. engages the element 13 so that the member 59 and structure associated therewith may be fixedly, yet removably, supported upon the block 10.

Each, member 59 is connected by means of a pivot pin 11 with a shoe 18 which is centrally slotted as at 19 to accommodate the periphery ofthe perforating wheel 63. The paper backing sheet 20' passes beneath the shoe 18 as shown in Figure 4 and servesto prevent adherence of the backing sheet 20 to the perforating wheel 63 during perforatin operations. The other end of the shoe 18 is joinedby meansof a pin with atenon '81 formed on a member 82. Member 82 is of iJ:-shaned configuration, the upper ends of adjacent leg portionsthereof being secured to a'block sfll threaded to receive an adjusting screw 85:. The innerwall-surfaces of the leg portions of member 82 are cylindrically shaped in crosssection to :receive an expansive spring 86. The upper end portion ofthe spring is provided with a. fittingzfl which bears against the plate spring 65.. The expansive pressure of spring 86 serves to urge the shoe 78 toward one position of adjustment. Secured to member 82 is-an L-shaped block 89 provided with a threaded opening to receive an abutment screw 90. The abutment screwSIl may be adjusted to engage the L-shaped frame member 4:! for limiting the extent of movement of member 82 and the shoe 18.

.Also mounted: for slidable movement on shaft 49 are several pairs of arms 92. and 93. Two of the perforating units designated M and M as 1 shown in Figure 2 :are associated with pairs of arms 92 while the other set of perforating units designated 42 and 42" are associated with pairs of'arms .93. The means forad'justing the lateral position. of each of the perforating units independently through the medium of arms 92 and 93xwill be hereinafter described.

Means are provided for guiding the backing sheet of paper or other suitable material 29 in a. direction .to be engaged by the perforating wheels 63. Joining the end frames 44 and 45 is a bar I04. to which iscsecured a member I95 in which the adjacent ends of adjusting screws I06 and IE7 are journaled at their abutting ends, the other end portions of the screws being journaled in suitable bearings carried by the end frames. Another bar I08 connects the end frames and supports a member I09 in which the abutting ends of adjusting screws II 0 and III are journaled. A relatively stationary shaft II4 carried by the end frames 44 and 45 forms a support for means guiding the backing sheet 20 into contact with the perforating wheels 63. Mounted on the shaft H4 is a plurality of cylindrical bushings H5, one adjacent each perforating wheel assembly. Each bushing carries a sleeve III supporting the .inner race 1 I38 of an antifriction or ball bearing H9. The inner bearing race is held in assembled position by'means of a retainer ring I20. Theouter race I 2I of the ball bearing II'I carries a. roller or disk I22 formed with a pe ripheral; groove I23 affording clearance for the teeth of the perforating wheel 63 as shown in Figure 6'. The roller I 22 is adapted to rotate underthe influence of movement of the paper or backing sheet 20.

Mounted upon the adjusting screw III] is a block "IZdwhich is bored and threaded to cooperate with the screw. Secured at each side of the block are yoke members I25 the fur-cations I21 of the yoke arranged to straddle the bearing H9 and roller I22 as shown in Figures 2, 5 and 6. The "sleeve II! is formed with a peripheral enlargement I28, the portion I28 and the ring I29 providing abutments for the yokes I26. When screw IJID is rotated by means hereinafter de- Means are provided for independently adjust ing each of the perforating and roller units transversely of the backing sheet 2i] for the purpose of positioning the perforators for Weakening the backing sheet 52 in linear zones in alignment with the rotary saws or cutters 25. The bars 46 and 5| support a plate 48 from which depend members 95 and 91, each being formed with a bore accommodating a bushing to receive unthreaded tenon portions formed on the ends of suitable adjusting screws. The end frame 44 supports a bearing member I33 in which is journaled a shaft I32, a major portion of the shaft being threaded, the end of the shaft being formed with a tenon E33 journaled in'bearing bushing I34 carried lag/"member 96. The shaft I32 is threaded through a block E35 of the unit 42 shown in Figure 2.

Secured upon the outer end of the shaft I32 is a manipulating means in the form of a hand wheel I37. Also fixedly secured to the shaft adjacent the bearing I34 is a sprocket wheel I38. The shaft I It projects eiiteriorly of the end frame 44 and supports a sprocket I39. A chain I40 takes over the sprockets I38 and I39 and an idler sprocke i4I whereby rotation of the hand wheel I3? and the shaft I32 adjusts the lateral position of perforating unit 42, and through the medium of sprocket I39 and chain I48 simultaneously rotates shaft H and moves roller I22 and its supporting assembly concurrently with the perforating unit 42 The idler sprocket I44 is adjustably supported by means (not shown) for maintaining the chain mo in taut condition so as to eliminate lost motion between the sprockets I38 and I39.

A second shaft I32 is arranged in alignment with shaft 532 and is of similar construction, the inner end being formed with a tenon journaled in the bearing bushing I34. Aflixed to the end of the shaft I32 is a hand wheel I31 and a sprocket I38 which is connected by'means of a' chain I40 with a sprocket I39 secured to the end of threaded shaft III. The inner end of shaft H! is formed with a tenon journaled in a bearing bushing mounted in member I09 shown in Figure 2. The shaft I32 is cooperatively associated with the perforating unit 42, the shaft passing through a threaded bore formed in a block its as shown in Figure 2. Thus manipulation of hand wheel I31 causes rotation of shafts 32 and i H and lateral movement of the perforating unit 52. and its adjacent paper supporting roller assembly. The chain Hill also overtakes an idler sprocket I45 which is adjustably supported to regulate the tension of the chain I40.

As shown in Figure 2, the perforating unit 4| is associated with a threaded shaft I44 of a construction similar to shaft I32 and has its inner-end formed with a tenon journaled in a suitable bearing (not shown) carried by member 91. A block I45 of construction similar to the block 35 13 formed with'a threaded bore for cooperation with the threaded portion of shaft I44 whereby rotation of the latter moves the perforating unit I transversely of the sheet 20. As particularly shown in Figure 3, the end of the shaft idiis provided with a hand wheel I41 and a sprocket It?) connected by means or" a chain Hi9 with a sprocket I53 fixedly secured to the end of the threaded shaft Iflfi. An idler sprocket I5! engages the chain I45 and is adjustable for the purpose'of regulating the tension of the chain I48. The shaft I35, through themedium of the 7 sprocket and chain arrangement, is simultaneously rotated withthe shaft I44 when the hand I48 with a sprocket I50 fixedly secured on the end of a threaded shaft I01. The shaft I01 is cooperatively associated with a sheet guiding roller (not shown) of the same construction as roller 522 and disposed adjacent the perforating unit 4|. Through the arrangement of sprockets and chain connecting shafts I44 and I01, rotation of the hand wheel I41 operates to adjust the position of the perforating unit M and its adjacent roller supporting assembly.

Through the mechanism for manipulating the shafts I32, I44, I32 and I44 it will be seen that each of the perforating units M, M, 42 and 42 may be adjusted transversely 'of the sheet 20 so that the perforating or weakening of the sheet may be accomplished in linear zones in registration or'alignment with rotary saws 25 as shown in Figure 2. Thus as the saws 25 are adjusted laterally to sever bats of different widths from the mat I6, each perforating unit may be adjusted to bring its perforating wheel into proper alignment with the rotary saw so that the perforating of the paper occurs on lines coinciding with the spaces between adjacent strips or bats.

As particularly shown in Figure 5, the backing or packaging sheet 20 is passed over rods I60 and I6I, around the roll I62 and beneath the shaft I53 and onto the upper flight of the conveyor I3 advancing the paper to a position underlying the mat IS. The rods or shafts I60 and ISI provide a means for controlling or regulating the tension of the backing sheet 20 so as to insure its proper movement through the perforatingunits so as to secure satisfactory perforation or weakening of the paper; The shafts I68 and IGI are non-rotatable, being fixedly secured at each end to brackets I65 and IE5. The bracket I65 is formed with tenon I61 which is adapted to be received in a suitable clamp I68 while bracket I66 is formed with a tenon I69 adapted to be received in a clamping device I10. The tenon I61 of bracket'IBE is adapted to receive the hub portion 11! of a manipulating arm I 12 as shown in Figure 2.

When it is desired to change or vary the tension of the sheet 20, the clamps I 58 and I10 may be released by manipulating the screws I13 and the rods itll and HM adjusted by moving the arm I12. The tension of the sheet is changed by shifting the relative position of the rods I60 and IGI to alter the acuteness of the serpentine path traversed by the sheet in passing around the rods as shown in Figure 5, thus modifying the frictional resistance to the advancement of the 1 sheet. After such adjustment has been made, the clamps I68 and I10 may be drawn into clamping position by screws I13 tosecure the shafts ISE! and I6! in fixed position, maintaining 'the desired tension in the'sheet 2E}. The sheet bolts I15 and slots I16 formed in the end frames 44 and 45.

The operation of. the apparatus of the invention for carrying out the method and process of forming packages of bats is as follows: A supply of molten glass contained in the forehearth I is passed as streams through small openings and under the influence of blowers I2 the streams are reduced to relatively fine filaments which are collected upon the conveyor I5 in the form or a mat I6 of fiuffy fibrous nature. The conveyor I5 moves the mat onto the conveyor I! which in turn conveys the mat through the shearing apparatus for severing or subdividing the mat into bats or units of predetermined size.

As shown in Figures 1 and 2, the rotary saws 25 are rotated by suitable means (not shown) to sever or slit the mat I6 into a plurality of coextensively arranged lengthsofthe fibrous material, in the embodiment illustrated the mat being subdivided longitudinally into five lengths designated 52 through 56 inclusive. The shearing knife 3I is adapted to cut the linear strips transversely into predetermined lengths as may be required for bat use;

The backing sheet 20 which may be of any suitable material, as for example kraft paper, is obtained from a supply roll 2I which passes around the tension regulating rods I60 and IBI, around the roll I62 through the perforating units, around the rod I63 and on to the conveyor I8 causing the paper to lay between the upper flight of the conveyor I8 and the mat I6 so that the paper or backing sheet forms a support for the bats severed from the mat I6 as it passes through the bat severing means illustrated in Figure 1.

As particularly shown in Figure 2, the perforating units 4|, 4|, 42 and 42 are adjusted so that the lines of perforations made in the backing sheet 20 are in alignment with the r0- tary saws 25. Each perforating unit and its supporting roller I22 may be adjusted laterally independently of the remaining perforating units by adjusting the proper hand wheel I37, I31, I41 and MI. For example in order to adjust or shift the position of perforating unit 42 and the paper guiding and supporting roller I22 in a lateral direction, the operator rotates the hand Wheel I31 which directly rotates the threaded shaft I32, and through the medium of the sprockets I38, I39 and chain I48 rotates the threaded shaft III) in the same direction. As both the perforating unit 42 and the adjacent paper supporting roller unit are threadedly associated with shafts I32 and III] having threads of the same pitch, the sprockets I33 and I39 being of the same diameter, both units will be moved simultaneously the same amount in the same direction. The unit 42 and its adjacent paper supporting roll are adjusted by manipulation of the hand wheel I31. Perforating units 4| and 4 I and the paper supporting roller units adjacent thereto are adjusted by manipulation of the hand wheels I41 and I41.

When the shearing device 3| severs the mat I6 and the backing sheet 20, the severed length of sheet 20 and the bats groups thereon are rolled into a package P as shown in Figures 1 and 12. The rolled configuration of the package may be maintained by suitable means as by the application of a strip of paper I19 or other material suitably gummed or coated with adhesive contacting the sheet 20 of the formed package as shown in Figure 12.

In the use of the individual bats from the package, a person making the installation of bats in a product to be insulated may quickly separate one or more of the sections from the remainder of the package by simply exerting an endwise force on the section to be separated causing a parting or severing of the bat section or sections fromthe package along a perforated zone. This operation is facilitated and made possible by reason of the weakening of the paper backing sheet by perforation, scoring or other suitable means.

Another form of means is illustrated in Figures 9 and 10 for weakening or scoring the paper in linear zones. In this form of device a supporting unit 59 similar in construction to the supporting unit 59 is slotted to receive a shaft 62 upon which is journaled a paper scoring wheel I having its periphery ground to an edge I82 adapted to engage the backing sheet. The backing sheet 26 is supported by a roller I83 similar in construction to the rollers I22. The roller I83 may be formed with a comparatively shallow peripheral groove I84 to facilitate in weakening the paper although this may be dispensed with and sufficient downwardly acting pressure exerted upon scoring wheel i8I to effect a partial crushing of the fibers of the backing sheet it without complete severance of the paper. The roller I8I may be carried upon suitable hearings in the same manner as roller I22 as shown in Figure 6, the rollers I83 being movable along the shaft H4 by means of the yoke construction I26.

It is to be understood that our invention embraces the weakening of the paper by any means particularly effective to weaken the paper by reducing its resistance to tear adjacent the spaces of separation of the individual bats making up the package and it is to be understood that we contemplate the utilization of equivalent means for accomplishing the results in accordance with the principles herein set forth.

We claim:

1. A process of producing an assemblage of units of fibrous material which includes advancing a plurality of separated fibrous units disposed in edge to edge relation, of concomitantly advancing a Web of sheet material having weakened zones into coextensive juxtaposition with the plurality of units whereby the weakened zones are aligned with the zones of separation of the units, and of rolling the assemblage of units and Web of sheet material into a compact package.

2. A process of producing an assemblage of units of fibrous material and a backing material which comprises advancing a supply of fibrous material, of severing the advancing fibrous material into a plurality of strips, of mechanically weakening a web of backing material in spaced zones as it is taken from a supply, of moving the web into coextensive juxtaposition with the fibrous material, and of shearing the strips of fibrous material and the adjacent portion of the web of backing material from the supply.

3. A process of producing an assemblage of units of fibrous material which consists in advancing a supply of fibrous material, of slitting the advancing fibrous material into a plurality of strips, of mechanically weakening a web of backing material in certain zones as it is taken from a supply, of underlaying the strips or" fibrous material as they advance with the web of backing material and of transversely shearing the strips of fibrous material and adjacent backing material from the supply.

4. The process of fabricating an assemblage of strips of fibrous material and a sheet of backin material which consists in severing an advancing mat of fibrous material to form a plurality of laterally separated strips, of moving a sheet of backing material into juxtaposed relation with the strips of fibrous material, of weakening the sheet of backing material at laterally spaced linear zones whereby the weakened zones lie in alignment with the spaces existent between adjacent strips of the fibrous material.

5,. The process of fabricating an assemblage of units of fibrous material and a backing sheet which consists in the steps of severing an advancing mat of fibrous material to form a plurality of laterally separated units, of moving a continuous strip of backing material into underlying relation with the separated strips of fibrous material, of perforating the strip of backing material in a direction of its length whereby the linear perforations lie in alignment with the spaces existent between adjacent units of the fibrous material, and of periodically transversely shearing the advancing assembly of perforated backing sheet and units of fibrous material from the supply.

6. The process of making packaged insulating strips which comprises advancing a continuous mat of fibrous insulating material in the general direction of its length, of slitting the mat to form a series of juxtaposed strips, of underlaying the mat with a web of paper, of mechanically weakening the paper web in linear zones whereby the weakened zones are aligned with the spaces separating adjacent strips of the mat, and of periodically severing the mat and web transversely of the direction of movement thereof and rolling each severed assemblage of strips and backing Web into a package.

7. Steps in the process of forming groups of insulating units which consists in advancing a continuous mat of insulating material in the general direction of its length, of severing the mat in a direction of its length to form a series of juxtaposed strips, of mechanically weakening a paper web in linear zones, of underlaying the strips With the paper web whereby the weakened zones are aligned with the spaces separating the severed strips, and of simultaneously severing the mat and web transversely of the direction of movement thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,536,924 Pierce May 5, 1925 1,710,393 Williams Apr. 23, 1929 2,047,472 Hotchkiss July 14, 1936 2,057,122 Trevellyan Oct. 13, 1936 2,270,043 Fourness et al Jan. 13, 1942 2,295,971 Savidge Sept. 15, 1942 2,354,186 Donahue July 25, 1944 2,373,500 Pearce Apr. 10, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 683,663 France Mar. 4, 1930 396,418 Great Britain July 24, 1933

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2747666 *Jul 28, 1953May 29, 1956Columbus Coated Fabrics CorpSlitting machine having two laterally movable outer knives and a center knife maintained midway between the outer knives
US2802528 *Nov 9, 1953Aug 13, 1957Dusenbery Co JohnScore-cut slitting mechanism
US2827961 *Dec 5, 1952Mar 25, 1958John G PughBelt slitting machine
US2969103 *Oct 24, 1955Jan 24, 1961Continental Can CoSheet slitting and scrap coiling machine and method
US2973607 *Jul 18, 1956Mar 7, 1961Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpMethod and apparatus for packaging fibrous materials
US3035330 *Jun 9, 1959May 22, 1962Lockport Mills IncDecorating material
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