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Publication numberUS2681728 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1954
Filing dateAug 19, 1952
Priority dateAug 19, 1952
Publication numberUS 2681728 A, US 2681728A, US-A-2681728, US2681728 A, US2681728A
InventorsBoron Frank J
Original AssigneeAmerican Brake Shoe Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Articulated link conveyer belt
US 2681728 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 22, 1954 Filed Aug. 19,

FIG.I

F. J. BORON ARTICULATED LINK CONVEYER BELT 3 She ets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2

INVENTOR. FRANK J. BORON BYMQMM ATTORNEYS June 22, 1954 F. J. BORON ARTICULATED LINK CONVEYER BELT 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 19. 1952 with an open! are placed. Various confi Patented June 22, 1954 UNITED STATES TENT OFFICE ARTICULATED LINK CON VEYER BELT Frank J. Boron ican Brake S corporation of Delaw hoe Com are , Elyria, Ohio, assignor to Ameripany, New York, N. Y., a

14 Claims.

This invention relates to conveyor belts and more particularly to .a conveyor belt which presents an uninterrupted or unbroken surface consisting of a series ofarticulated metallic links upon which the work to be conveyed is supported. The present invention has particular utility in connection with those heat treating furnaces which have a moving bottom wall for carrying the article to be heat-treated into and out of the furnace.

Conveyor belts in which a plurality of articulated metallic links are arranged to present an uninterrupted or continuous supporting surface have been resorted to heretofore under different circumstances, as for instance in connection ended furnace wherein such a conveyor belt constitutes a moving bottom wall for the furnace and upon which the articles to be conveyed into the furnace for heat treatment gurations and arrangeorted to in connection with ed to construct such a belt, mercially feasible for-ms are characterized by a pivot rod or pin which is used not only as a connecting means for the links that are thus interconnected but also as a means on which the links are free to pivot and :turn during the course of advancing movement of the belt, particularly as it turns about the sprockets. The belts of the prior art are characterized by links that are formed separately and distinct, as a casting or otherwise, from the pin or rod upon which the links are mounted for pivotal movement. The link and the pivot pin are invariably such that the pin represents a relatively weak connection, usually being a wrought structure, and since the pin necessarily functions as a work-supporting part itself there is a tendency for such pins to be bent as the result of being subjected to greater load stresses than the pin is capable of withstanding or supporting. This defect has been referred to in the art as crank-shafting.

Another problem that has arisen in connection with the prior art belts, wherein the link and its pivot represent separate parts, is that caused by distortions in the pivot, this being manifest in a pulling apart, so to speak, of the conveyor belt much as webbing is often stretched and opened up as the result of extended use. Consequently, the ability of the conveyor belt to properly support the work in efficientmanments have been res the metallic links us but most of the coin nor is greatly impaired, and in view of the fact that the possibility of over-stressing the pivot- :ing pins is increased, the condition causes further crank-shafting of the pivot pins.

The primary object of the present invention, therefore, is to eliminate the deleterious effects and results occurring in conveyor belts of the aforesaid type caused by the bent and distorted pivots which represent elements separate and distinct from the links associated therewith. It will be appreciated that an ideal condition in a conveyor belt of the aforesaid articulated metallic link type would be one wherein the links and their pivots are of the same strength and quality. That this condition would be desirable can be realized from the fact that prior conveyor belts consisting of articulated metallic links arranged in an endless series, and to form an uninterrupted surface, are characterized by links which are much stronger than the pivot means associated therewith, requiring loading in conformance with theability of the pivot pins or the like to resist crank-shafting, or else loading in conformance with the work-supporting ability of the links subject to the inevitable crank-shafting of the pivot rods. According- 1y, it is a further object of the present invention to have a conveyor belt in which the 0lk-S1lpporting ability of the links in relation to that of the means for permitting the links to pivot and turn stands .in a ratio of 1:1.

It has also been observed in connection with the use of conveyor belts of the prior art that there is a great tendency for the belt to bind and lockalong the pivotal axes, this being due to the fact that in most instances the pivot rod or pin is relatively long, functioning as a pivoting means for a plurality of links arranged in side-by-side relationship along the pivot rod. Under such circumstances, it is virtually impossible to maintain the pivot perfectly straight, at least for an extended period of use, and this of course causes the links to become nus-aligned and therefore to bind. It is therefore an additional object of the present invention to eliminate the binding tendencies in conveyor belts construct-ed of articulatedrnetallic links which are to be arranged to afford an uninterrupted and continuous surface, and to permit each such link to pivot in such a manner as to provide its own pivot when assembled with other like links. A further object in this regard is to integrate the link and the pivot means so that there is afforded a unitary link structure of a configuration and arrangement such that the same may be cast as one body.

A further object of the present invention is to construct and arrange a link for a conveyor belt so that the link not only embodies a work-supporting surface but also a pivotal means formed integral therewith whereby such a link may be arranged with two or more like links to form a link group, in which the pivoting action takes place on and about integral elements of the links themselves. A further object in this regard is to permit each link in a conveyor belt to assume what may be termed a floating condition to the extent that each such link is adapted to absorb shocks and conform to stress differentials without materially affecting the other links.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawing which, by Way of illustration, show a preferred embodiment of the present invention and the principle thereof and what I now consider to be the best mode in which I have contemplated applyin that principle. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principle may be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the present invention and the purview of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a group of links constructed and arranged in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view, broken away in part, of a conveyor belt embodying the links of the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view of a pair of links showing the manner in which the links may pivot relative one to the other;

Fig. i is a plan view of one of a center or channel link;

Fig. 5 is a of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of a large side link;

Fig. '7 is a sectional view taken on the line 1'l of Fig. 3;

Fig. 8 is an elevational trated in Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on the line 99 of Fi 8;

Fig. 10 is a sectional view taken on the line 29-? of Fig. 8;

Fig. 11 is a plan view of one of the smaller side links;

Fig. 12 is a horizontal sectional view of the link illustrated in Fig. 11; and

Fig. 13 is a schematic representation of the manner in which a conveyor belt constructed along the lines of the present invention may be arranged for use.

For purposes of disclosure, the present invention is illustrated in the drawings as embodied in a conveyor belt cs, Figs. 1, 2 and 13, that consists of a plurality of articulated metallic links sectional View taken on the line 55 view of the link illusof the type shown in Fig. 1 at 20C, 2% and 20H.

Generally, each such link is cruciform in outline and comprises a hollow body portion 24, the longitudinal axis of which is adapted to extend parallel to the direction of travel when the link is arranged in a belt as 4! As will be described in more detail below, the construction of each link is such that when arranged with other links in parallel transverse rows, with lugs TL and'BL at either end of the body portions 2d aligned as shown for instance in Fig. 2, the resulting rows can belinked up in a novel manner by a means including-the lugs TL and BL to form a strong, flexible, shock-absobent conveyor belt at in which no one longitudinal link edge as 35, Fig. 2, is continuous along the length of the 4. belt at. Laterally projecting Wings ZiW at the top side of the body portion of each link constitute part of a continuous work-supporting surface and that also includes surfaces 2 ET and 2 EE, and in addition the wings MW cooperate with one another to define staggered recesses at the underside of the belt in which may be located the teeth 53 of sprockets as Fig. 13, for driving the belt ill as will be described below.

The belt 53 may be of any desired or convenient length and width, and of course the links forming end rows at the opposite ends of the belt are to be connected to afford an endless work supporting surface. The side links at the left side of the belt and the side links at the right side of the belt are each provided with upstanding flanges 22, Fig. 1, whereby there are afforded left and right walls, 22L and 22R, respectively, Fig. 2, that locate between them the conveyor surface or channel in which the work is to be located. The links within this conveyor channel are identified as 206 in Fig. 1, and at the same time it will be observed that the side links, ZIF and fill-I, are of two types. Thus, a link 26F in reality is nothing more than a link 290 that is cast, or otherwise suitably formed, with a wall-defining flange 22. A side link 23H, on the other hand, may be looked upon as a link 28C that has been provided with a wall-defining flange 22 and out in half along its longitudinal axis.

Each of the links 20C, 26F and 25H is a casting and, as shown in Figs. 1 and 3, comprises the relatively thick and blunt rectangular shaped body portion 261 which includes a bottom wall 23 and an equally dimensioned top wall 25 spaced therefrom so that a relatively large opening 28, Fig. 3, bounded by the top and bottom walls 23 and 25 respectively, extends through the link. The top side ZiT of the top wall 25 represents part of the work supporting surface or table of the link. Since the links are cast bodies, all surfaces and elements are continuous, that is, unbroken, and the opposite ends of the body portion 2d of each link are represented, respectively, by a trunnion 111g TL and a bearing lug BL. The lugs TL and BL, integrally formed at either end of each link, project in opposite directions along the longitudinal axis of the links and are each of a generally cylindrical shape, having a width equal to the lateral width of the body portion 2% and a vertical diameter equal to the height of the body portion 24 from the under side of the bottom wall 23 to the top-side of the top wall 25. As best shown in Fig. 1, the tops of the curved surfaces of the lugs TL and BL are tangential with top surfaces ESE, at either end of the links, that constitute longitudinal extensions of the surface EiT of each link. Similar surfaces havin dimensions equal to the surfaces ZlE are located at corresponding positions at the bottom of each link as can be appreciated from Fig. 3.

Projecting outwardly from the top side ,or work supporting surface 251 of each of the links 230, and located between the lugs BL and TL thereon so as to constitute lateral continuations of the surface 2 l'l, are a pair of work supporting wings 24W. The work supporting surfaces 25W are each of a width about equal to one-half the width of the work supporting surfaces PAT so that, as shown in Fig. 3, the combined width of the two wings ZEW on the links 2&0 and fill? is about equal to the width of the body portion 2d of that particular link. The significance of this dimensional relationship will be pointed out below. a

ace-132s It will be seen, then, that when a pair of links NC are arranged in side-by-side relationship with the wing 21W of one link arranged contiguous to the adjacent wing of the other link, the body portions 24 thereof, will be spaced laterally apart from each other a substantial distance as indicated at 15, Fig. 2. It is this space !5 that is afforded by an adjacent pair of links that permits a driving relationship to be established between the sprockets 42 and the belt 40, as will be described in slightly more detail below. Also, when immediate adjacent links are thus arranged, the respective bearing lugs BL and the trunnion lugs TL thereof will also be spacedapart from one another a distance corresponding to the spacing as will be clear from Fig. 2.

It will be seen from the foregoing that each of the links 200 embodies a body portion 24 having a lug formed integral therewith at either end, the width and height of these lugs conforming to that of the body portion. The work supporting surface of each such link comprises the surface 2lT, having lateral dimensions equal to the body portion 24, the wings "2IW which project horizontally from the opposite sides thereof so as to be disposed in an outboard relationship relative to the surface HT and the body of the link, and the surfaces 2I-E at either end of the link. The side links 29F and H are of similar configuration and arrangement, one difference being, however, that each of these links also embodiesa flange "22 which in the case of the links as 20F will be located at the outboard edge of the left or right wing 2|W depending upon whether such link is to be located at the left or rightedge of the belt 453. On the other hand, the side links 20H are each formed with but asingle wing 2:! W, as shown in Fig. 11, and the work supporting surfaces 2IT and 21E: are of half dimensions relative to the lateral dimensions of these surfaces .on the links ZIJC' and 201*". Like the link MF, the flange 22 on the link 20H is located at the extreme left or right edge depending upon the side of the belt 40 which it is to occupy;

otherwise, all three links are similar in -dimensions, arrangement, configuration, and general shape.

When the links2iIC, 20F, and ZBH-are arranged in rows to form a belt, it is essential of course that the belt be capable of turning, as for instance, about the sprockets that may be used as va :driving means, and also that there be some "play in the belt. This is brought about by piv- 'otally interconnecting the links, and in accord- :ance with the present invention, the pivotal means whereby the links may thus be pivotally interconnected one with another to form a conveyor belt as 46 are cast or otherwise formed integral with each of the links. Such pivotal means includes a trunnion and a bearing opening, and these are located at the respective trunnion lugs 'TLrand the'bearing lugsBL, the arrangement being such that a trunnion which is located on the trunnion log on one of the links may be loosely journaled in a bearing opening located in the i-bearing lug of another link to thereby pivotally interconnect such two links.

The links are interchangeable to the extent that the trunnion and bearing opening of any one link are equally related in dimensions to the same elements on any votherlink. Consequently, when connecting the links in link groups, it is only necessary to choose according to whether a center, large side, .or 'small side link :is needed.

.Thus, laszbest shown ainl igs. 2.1 and J3, relatively n5 short trunnions 26 are formed integral with the trunnion lugs TL on either side thereof on the links 2-00 and 26F. In contrast, a single trunnion only is provided on the smaller side links 20H, and from the description to follow it will be recognized that such single trunnions are located at the inside of the links EilH in relation to the belt to that may include such links.

The trunnions 25 are located somewhat behind and below the work-supporting wings MW and are arranged to project normal to the path of travel of the links, that is normal to the longitudinal axis of the links. As shown in Fig. 4, the length of each trunnion 2-6 is somewhat less than the corresponding lateral dimension of the associated wing it W so that the end of each trunnion falls short of the longitudinal edge of such work supporting piece. Each trunnion 26 is provided with a passage 27, 5, for a purpose that will be described in detail below. However, it may be pointed out that like the body portion it, the trunnion lug TLof each link is cast hollow as indicated at 29 and opens into the hollow Till, Fig. 3, that is located between the top and bottom walls'of the link. In this manner, light-weight character is imparted to each link since the large opening 28 in effect extends to the rear wall of the trunnion lug TL as illustrated in in. It will also be noted that these passages 2i extend through the associated trunnion lug, the openingsor passages 29 interiorly of the trunnion lugs representing enlargements of the passages 23.

The bearing lug EL at the other end of the link is formed with a bearin opening to that extends therethrough from one side to the other, and with regard to the links 260 and 2535 this hearin opening lid is of a length such that two of the trunnions 26 may easily and loosely fit thereinto, one from either end of the bearing opening, with their ends facing toward one another inside the bearing opening so as to preferably hespacedslightly apart. In a similar manner, the inside diameter of the bearin opening :36 is such as to be at least greater than equal to the outside diameter of the trunnions 26, and is preferably of :a diameter such that the latter may be journaled relatively free and loos-e within the bearing opening 38. The length of the .bearingopenings 36 in the smaller side links 26H, as shown in Fig. 1 is only about onehalf that of the bearing openin s in the larger links 26C and 23F, and thus it will be seen that the trunnion (lugs and bearin lugs of the side links 20H, while otherwise similar to those of the larger linksas shown in Figs. 1 and 2, are of a width just about one-half that of these larger links .5230 and EDF. i

The rear of each bearing opening Figs. 0 and 8, is open so as to communicate with the large central opening 28 that runs through the link. Spaced apart upper and lower lips I? are formed at the rear of the bearing openings 30, to project toward ono another a sufficient extent to assure that'the trunnions it will remain seated in the bearing openings 35 when inserted therein. These lips extend from one side of the bearin opening as to the other as illustrated in 5, the thickness of the top and bottom walls 25 and 23 being reduced so as to afford fiat faces +9 at the rear of the lips H1 in contrast to the curved forward faces 58 thereof which are coin- ;cident with, and represent part of the periphery of'the'be aring opening 39.

:The arrangement between the trunnion lugs IITL and the bearing lugs BL of the linksis such that a trunnion 26 of any one link may be fitted into one side or the other of the bearing openin 30 of any other link in a free and loose manner. The trunnion 26 that is thus located within a bearing opening 30, and held in place by the lips IT as shown in Fig. 3, will not occupy more than one-half the length of the bearing opening unless, of course, the bearing opening 30 happens to be that in a side link H. Consequently, it will be seen that when a pair of links as 200 or 20C and 20F, are arranged in side-by-side relationship, the respective trunnions of these paired links which project inwardly toward one another may each be fitted into the opposite ends of the bearing opening of a third link 20C or 20F so that in effect a pyramided group of three links is pivotally interconnected as can be appreciated from Figs. 1 and 2. Thus, in Fig. 3 there are illustrated two of the links, 3| and 32, of such a pyramided group of three links, the bearing opening till-I in the one link 3| receiving one of the trunnions 26-2 that projects from the trunnion tug Til-2 of the second link 32, and in this manner the links 3| and 32 are pivotally interconnected one with the other. Under such conditions, only one-half or less of the length of the bearing opening 3|i| in the link 3| will thus be occupied by a trunnion, leaving sufficient length for another trunnion to be extended into the remaining space of the bearing opening in the link 3| as will be appreciated from Fig. 7. Three such links that may be arranged in this manner, with the facing or inwardly projecting trunnions of a pair of links journaled in the bearing openin 36 of a third link, are illustrated in the belt to of Fig. 2 as comprising a pair of side abutting adjacent links 32 and 33 and a third link 3|. The facing wings 2 IW of the pair 32-33 will abut along a line 35 with the space 35 between the respective trunnion lugs of these two links 32 and 33 bein occupied by the bearing lug 3|-BL of the third link 3|. Similarly, the bearing lugs 32-BL and 33-BL of the pair of links 32 and 33 will define a forward space 31 in which the trunnion lug of still a fourth link may be located with its oppositely directed trunnions each located in the respective bearing openings of the links 32 and 33. Since, in the present instance, the spaces as 36 and 31 are each to be occupied entirely by a bearing lug on the one hand and trunnion lug on the other, the wings 2|W are each of a width not less than half the width of the body portions 2 1 of the links, or in other words not less than half the width of the work supportin surfaces EIT and the lugs BL and TL themselves. i

This arrangement between links is repeated the length and width of the belt All. At the sides of the belt, a link 20F will be substituted to cocupy the position that would otherwise be occupied by one of the center or channel links 20C, and since it will be recognized that the corresponding positions in the rows of links immedi ately in front and back of such a substituted link 20F would each be occupied by only half a link 260, as can be appreciated from Fig. 2, the smaller side links 29H are used to complete the length of these other two rows of links.

During assembly, at least two rows of links can be worked on simultaneously, startin initially with one of the small side links 20H, fitting one of the trunnions 2'6 of the corresponding side link 20F in the next row of links completely into the bearing opening 36 of the initial side link, 29H, slipping the bearing lug BL of. a link 2|lC on to the other trunnion 26 of the link 20F so that the links 201-1 and 280 are arranged sideby-side in one row, and then locating a fourth link 20C in side-by-side relation to the link 20F in the other row and so on as will be clear from Fig. 2.

As best illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3, it will be observed that when two or more links are interconnected through their cooperating trunnions and bearings, the rear of each trunnion lug will project back under the leading end of the wings 2 IW, if the belt 49 be looked upon as adapted to move from left to right in the drawings. Similarly, the bearing lugs project forwardly under the trailing ends of these work-supporting members. The arrangement is preferably such that the ends of the work supporting surfaces 2|E, Figs. 1 and 2, are about coincident with the ends of the work supporting surfaces 2 IW, so that the top side of the belt as so may be substantially continuous and uninterrupted for all practical purposes. To the end that this be best effected and that there be complete freedom of pivotal movement between the links, such leading and trailing ends of the wings 2|W are each beveled inwardly and downwardly as at M and I6 respectively, the bevel being generally complementary to the curvature of the respective lugs BL and TL to thereby freely accommodate the latter.

During the handling of the belt do, as for instance during the time that it is being located on the sprockets 22, Fig. 13, it is necessary of course that the links be held together, and in the present instance this is made possible by using a connecting means in the form of a rod 44, Fig. 2, that will correspond in length to the width of the belt it. There will be one such rod for each row of links, and each rod as it will be located in the aligned passages 27 that are formed to extend through the trunnicns 26 of aligned links. It can be observed from Fig. 2 that the passages 27 and the bearing openings 3% in the side links 2011 will normally be exposed to View at the sides of the belt in contrast to the larger side links 2F, and of course the center links 20C. These exposed openings in the links 26H represent a means for securing the rods 44 in position. Thus, it will be noted that washers or retaining caps 45 and 46 are welded to the opposite ends of each of the rods 44. The caps or washers 45 and 26 are of slightly different types in that the caps 45 are each adapted for use with the end of a rod 44 that corresponds to the interior of the trunnion lug TL of smaller side link 2Ql-I that is exposed or opened at the side of the belt as shown in Fig. 2. On the other hand, the caps 26 are each adapted for use with that end of a rod M which corresponds to the bearing lug BL at the forward or leading end of one of the smaller side links 20H. As indicated in Fig. 2, it will be observed that when the trunnion 25 of a large side link 20F is properly located in relation to the corresponding bearing lug BL of a smaller side link 20H, the end of this trunnion falls somewhat short of extend- 'ing completely to the exposed or open end of the bearing opening. it will also he observed that the cap 46 is formed with an annular projection or extension d3 which is of a reduced diameter to correspond to that of the trunnicns 26 so that the size of this reduced cap portion 48 is such as to fill the space between the end of the trunnioniifi and the bearing opening 3% at the leading end of the smaller side link 29H. When the rod 44 is properly in place, the opposite ends thereof project slightly beyond the sides of the belt til, and the washers as 66 are simply slipped over the opposite projecting ends of the rod 44 so as to overlappingly engage the outer sides of the particular side link 28H and the side link 20F immediately infront thereof. Under such conditions, the ends of the projections 58 are contiguous the ends of those trunnions it that are located within the corresponding bearing open" ings in the side links 2211 at the opposite sides of the belt.

In a similar manner, the washers .5 are adapted to be used with the end of a connecting rod Mi that corresponds to the trunnion lugs at the trailing ends on another set of opposite side links Elli-I. Thus, it will be seen that the washers 25 are formed with projections ll of a reduced diameter, also corresponding to that of the trunnions 25, but are somewhat larger than the projections 133 so as to fit into the openings 29, Fig. 12, that represent enlargements of the passages 2i in the trunnion lugs TL of the links 29H. In this connection, it will be recognized that the length of the enlarged passage 29 interiorly of the trunnion lug of a small link ZilH will be just about half that of the links 200 and 28F.

In Fig. 13 there is illustrated one form in which the belt so constructed along the lines of the present invention may be used. The belt is arranged to afford an endless work supporting surface, and a pair of sprockets 42 are afforded to drive the belt to in continuous runs as for instance from left to right and then back as viewed in Fig. 13. In this connection, it is of importance to note that there will be a space [5, Fig. 2, between the adjacent body portions 2d of adjacent links, this space being open at the bottom but bounded at the sides by the body portions 23 of such adjacent links, at the top by the abutting work supporting surfaces MW of these adjacent links, and at the ends by the lugs BL and TL of respective other links. Such spaces as it will occur in regular pitches along a transverse row of links so that there will be a plurality of spaced apart openings id in each row of links. At the same time, the arrangement of the links is such that the openings l5 will alternate in adjacent transverse rows so that only the openings H5 in every other row will be registered one with another in a longitudinal column, that is, along the path of travel of the belt it. Consequently, as shown in Fig. 13, the teeth 43 of the sprockets 62 may be of a configuration to fit up into the spaces 25 to engage the rearward-most extensions of the transversely aligned trunnion lugs TL in driving relation thereto, and to this end each tooth lt is formed with a cradle or pocket Q30 which is shaped to conform to the curvature of trunnions TL. The supporting cradles 436 are raised above the periphery MP of the sprockets 42, and it follows that no part of the conveyor belt do will directly engage the solid surface 52]? of the sprockets. In this mannor, the belt all, while driven by the sprockets, is suspended so-to-speak by the teeth 43, this feature assuring that the conveyor belt is evenly pulled across its width and that no crushing action takes place at the sprockets.

Since the openings i 5 in adjacent transverse rows of links are staggered, the rows of teeth 43 will be staggered in a similar manner in a regular series about the periphery of the sprockets 62. In use, idler rollers 4| may be afforded intermediate the sprockets 42 along the path of travel of the belt 48.

It is of importance to point out that once the belt 40 is mounted for use as on the sprockets t2, the connecting rods 4.4, being connecting means only, do no work, are subjected to no stress, and simply float or rest in the rod receiving passages 21.

It will be seen from the foregoing that the present invention is characterized by a worksupporting conveyor belt constructed from articulated metallic links in which the links provide their own pivots as manifested by the absence of any separately formed pivot bar or pin used to interconnect the links in a pivotal manner. The belt is stronger than any such belt heretofore used in the art, will not bind or look in use, and is capable of an increased amount of flexibility to the extent that by casting the trunnions of a somewhat smaller diameter than the bearing openings, the links are each adapted to absorb and compensate shocks and diiferential loading to the exclusion of adjacent links. That is to say, the links in the belt as G0 may be looked upon as individually being in a floating condition thereby resulting in a greater utility for the belt from the standpoint of its work-supporting abilities.

Insofar as construction and arrangement of the links are concerned, various equivalents and modifications may be resorted to. For instance, the shape may be altered, and the side flanges 22 arranged to be continuous or spaced apart further or omitted altogether.

I claim:

1. A conveyor belt of the type described comprising a plurality of articulated metallic links arranged in rows to be. connected in an endless series, the links each comprising a body portion having a work supporting surface and a pair of lugs formed integral therewith, one at either end thereof, so that said lugs project in opposite directions along the longitudinal axis of the link, each of said lugs being spaced inwardly of the sides of said supporting surface a distance to define horizontally projecting wings located at the respective sides of the work supporting surface of each of the links and extending beyond the sides of said body, one of said lugs being provided at each of its opposite sides with an integral trunnion projecting outwardly therefrom and below said wings in a horizontal direction normal to the path of travel of the belt a distance less than that of said wings, the other of said lugs being formed with a bearing opening extended horizontally.therethrough that is of a length not less than equal to the combined length of a pair of trunnions, said links being arranged in parallel rows with the wing at the one side of one link in registered relation with the wing at the other side of the next adjacent link and with the lugs that contain bearing openings at the respective ends of such adjacent links aligned. horizontally so that a space is afforded therebetween, and a third link in the row of links next adjacent the row corresponding to said adjacent links being located such that the lug thereof which is provided with trunnions is located in said space with the trunnions thereof extended in to the related bearing openings of the said adjacent links.

2. A link for a conveyor belt, adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links to afford a pivotally linked supporting surface, com prising a body portion affording a fiat and horizontal work supporting surface, said body portion having an integral lug projecting from either 1 1 end thereof respectively at the front and back of the work supporting surface, said lugs being equally spaced inwardly of the respective sides of said supporting surface to thereby define work supporting wings on the link that are flush with said work supporting surface, one of said lugs being formed with a relatively short trunnion V at either side thereof projecting outwardly therefrom the opposite ends thereof.

3. A link for a conveyor belt adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links to afford a pivotally linked supporting surface, comprising a body portion having a fiat and horizontal work supporting surface for supporting the work to be carried by the belt, a trunnion support formed integral with said body portion at one end thereof and having identical relatively short trunnions projecting outwardly from the opposite sides thereof, a bearing support at the other end of said body portion having a bearing opening extended therethrough, the diameter of said bearing opening being greater than equal to the diameter of said trunnions and of a length not less than equal to the combined length of two of said trunnions, and flat horizontal work supporting wings projecting laterally from opposite sides of said work supporting surface in a co-planar relation therewith, said wings projecting laterally beyond said trunnion and bearing supports so that the trunnion and bearing supports of adjacent ones of the links in a row are spaced from each other.

4. A link for a conveyor belt adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links to afford a pivotally linked supporting surface, comprising a body portion having a work supporting surface for supporting the work to be carried by the belt, a trunnion support formed integral with said body portion at one end thereof and having a relatively short trunnion projecting from a side'thereof, a bearing support formed integral with said body portion at the other end thereof and having a diameter and length at least greater than equal to the corresponding dimensions of said trunnion whereby the trunnion of one such link may be journaled in the bearing opening of another such link to afford a pivoted connection between the links, and work supporting wings projecting laterally from one side of said work supporting surface in a coplanar relation therewith so as to project laterally beyond the trunnion support and the bearing support.

5. A conveyor belt comprising a plurality of articulated metallic links arranged and connected in a general side-by-side and end-to-end relationship, the construction and arrangement of the links being such that each of said links has a body portion provided with a flat and horizontal work supporting surface, a trunnion formed integral with said body portion at one end thereof so as to project from said work supporting surface in a direction normal to the path of travel of the link, and a bearing opening at the other end of the link in which the trunnion of another such link is mounted whereby such two links are pivotally interconnected with the trunnion of one link pivotally mounted in the bearing opening of the other link, and the work supporting surfaces of the two links being disposed in the same horizontal plane.

6. A link for a conveyor belt adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links to afford a pivotally linked supporting surface, comprising a body portion having a fiat and horizontal work supporting surface at the top thereof, a trunnion projecting from a point at one end of said body portion below said work supporting surface in a generally horizontal direction that is normal to the longitudinal axis of the link, a bearing opening formed in said body portion at the other end thereof, said bearing opening having a diameter corresponding to that of said trunnion whereby the trunnion of any such link may be pivotally mounted in the bearing opening of any other such link, a work supporting wing projecting laterally from said work supporting surface in a co-planar relation therewith so as to project laterally beyond the parts of said body portion having the trunnion and bearing opening respectively, and a horizontal rod-receiving opening formed in said trunnion to permit a plurality of such links to be assembled in side-by-side relation on said rod with the side edges of opposite work supporting wings engaging one another.

'7. A link for a conveyor belt comprising a body portion having a rectangular shaped work supporting surface with a pair of laterally extended and rectangular shaped work supporting wings formed integral therewith intermediate the ends of said body portion so that the leading and trailing ends of said wings are spaced from the corresponding ends of said body portion, a pair of identical trunnions formed integral with said body portion at one end thereof to the rear of and below said wings so as to project horizontally from the sides of the link in a direction that is normal to the longitudinal axis of the link, and a bearing opening extended through the other end of the link in parallel relation to said trunnions and located forwardly of and below said wings, said bearing opening having a diameter at least greater than equal to the diameter of the trunnions and a length not less than equal to the combined length of the trunnions whereby the trunnions of two such links which project toward one another when such two links are arranged in side-by-side relation may be located in the bearing opening of a third link, the combined width of said wings being about equal to the width of said body portion whereby when two such links are arranged in side-by-side relation the opposite ends of the body portions thereof will be spaced apart a distance corresponding substantially to the width of the body portion of any one such link.

8. A link for a conveyor belt comprising a body portion having a work supporting surface, a trunnion formed integral with said body portion so as to project normal to and below said work supporting surface at one end of said body portion, a bearing opening formed in the other end of said body portion to extend therethrough in parallel relation to said trunnion, and a rodreceiving passage formed to extend through said trunnion, the size relation between the trunnion and bearing openings being such that the respective trunnions of a series of such links can be interchangeably journaled in the respective bearing openings to pivotally interconnect the links in selective groups with a rod inserted through the rod-receiving passages in the trunnions to hold such links in a group.

9. Links for a conveyor belt of the type described, each of said links comprising a body portion having a work supporting surface, a trunnion formed integral with said body portion so as to project normal to and below said work supporting surface at one end of said body portion, a bearing opening formed in the other end of said body portion to extend therethrough in parallel relation to said trunnion, and a rod receiving passage formed to extend through said trunnion, the size relation between the trunnion and bearing opening being such that the respective trunnions of a series of such links can be interchangeably journaled in the respective bearing openings to pivotally interconnect the links in selective groups with a rod inserted. through the rod-receiving passages in the trunnions to hold such links in a group.

10. A conveyor belt comprising a plurality of pivotally interconnected and articulated metallic links, each of said links comprising a body por tion having a work supporting surface, a trunnion formed integral with said body portion so as to project normal to and below said work sup porting surface at one end of said body portion,

a bearing opening formed in the other end of i said body portion to extend therethrough in parallel relation to said trunnion, and a rod-receiving passage formed to extend through said trunnion, the size relation between the trunnion and hearing opening being such that the respective trunnions of a series of such links can be interchangeably journaled in the respective bearing openings to pivotally interconnect the links in selective groups with a rod inserted through the rod-receiving passages in the trunnions to hold such links in a group.

11. A link for a conveyor belt adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links to afford a pivotally linked supporting surface, comprising an elongated body portion having a flat and horizontal work-supporting surface, a trunnion formed integral with said body portion so as to project normal to the longitudinal axis of said work-supporting surface in a horizontal direction from one end of said body portion, a bearing opening formed in the other end of said body portion in parallel relation to said trunnion, the size relation between the trunnion and bearing opening being such that the respective trunnions of a series of such links can be interchangeably journaled in the respective bearing openings to pivotally interconnect the links in selective groups, and work-supporting wings formed as lateral extensions of said work supporting surface so as to be co-planar therewith, said wings each being of such width that when the trunnion of one link is mounted in the bearing opening of another such link the wing of the said one link overlaps that portion of the said other link in which the bearing opening thereof is formed.

12. A conveyor belt comprising a plurality of pivotally interconnected and articulated metallic links, each of said links comprising an elongated body portion having a work-supporting surface, a trunnion formed integral with said body portion so as to project normal to said work-supporting surface from one end of said body portion, bearing openings formed in the other end of said body portion in parallel relation to said trunnion, the size relation between the trunnion and bearing opening being such that the respecive trunnions of a series of such links can be interchangeably journaled in the respective bearing openings to pivotally interconnect the links in selective groups, and integral work-supporting wings projecting laterally from the work-supporting surfaces of the links beyond the lateral edges of those portions of the links in which the respective bearing openings are formed so that the wings of one such link in the conveyor belt overlie and lap that portion of another such link in which the bearing opening thereof is located.

13. A link adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links to afford the work supporting means of a conveyor belt, said links having a work supporting surface with a trunnion at one end and a bearing opening at the other end of a s ze to receive said trunnion whereb: the trunnion of any one such link may be pivotally mounted in the bearing opening of another such link, and an integral work supporting wing projecting laterally from said work supporting surface beyond the lateral edge of that portion of the link in which the bearing opening is formed to permit the wing of said one such link to overlie and lap that portion of the said other such link in which the bearing opening thereof is formed.

14. A link adapted to be used in conjunction with other similar links in a conveyor belt, comprising a body having a fiat work supporting surface for carrying the work to be transported by the belt, a trunnion formed integral with the body at one end thereof, a bearing opening at the other end of the body arranged in parallel relation to said trunnion whereby the trunnion of one such link may be journaled in the bearing opening of another such link, an integral work supporting wing projecting laterally from said work supporting surface beyond the lateral edge of the portion of the link in which the bearing opening is formed to permit the work supporting wing of said one such link to overlie and lap that portion of the said other such link having the bearing opening, and a rod-receiving passage formed to extend through said trunnion to permit a series of such links to be arranged in a row on the rod in said side-by-side relation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,282,063 Froelich Oct. 22, 1918 1,831,639 Reece Nov. 10, 1931 2,252,460 Sinden Aug. 12, 1941

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Classifications
U.S. Classification198/851, 198/822
International ClassificationB65G17/10, B65G17/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65G17/10, B65G17/06, B65G2812/02514
European ClassificationB65G17/06, B65G17/10