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Publication numberUS2682273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 29, 1954
Filing dateSep 1, 1950
Priority dateSep 1, 1950
Publication numberUS 2682273 A, US 2682273A, US-A-2682273, US2682273 A, US2682273A
InventorsRoach James E
Original AssigneeEvron L Kline
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like
US 2682273 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 29, 1954 J. E. ROACH 2,682,273

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING PAINT SPRAY GUNS AND THE LIKE Filed Sept. 1, 1950 Q Q m FTC ll INVENTOR James E. R

BY ozil Patented June 29, 1954 APPARATUS FOR CLEANING PAINT SPRAY GUNS AND THE LIKE James E. Roach, Battle Creek, Mich., assignor to Evron L. Kline, Battle Creek, Mich.

Application September 1, 1950, Serial No. 182,729

8 Claims.

The present invention relates broadly to cleaning equipment, and in its specific phases to an apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns.

Spray painting has become a big industry and is used for the painting of items varying in size from small articles to buildings. Each time that a job is finished, a days work is over, or the color or kind of paint being sprayed is to be changed, the paint spray gun must be thoroughly cleaned both inside and out or else it will not be in proper condition for reuse. The standard procedure for doing this cleaning ofpaint spray guns has been to immerse same in a suitable solvent such as thinner, turpentine, gasoline, naptha, benzol, or the like. After the paint or the like on or in the gun has been soaked loose, it is common practice to rinse it oil with a solvent and then throw the solvent away. The solvent thus discarded makes this procedure costly and moreover the cleaning of the spray gun in this manner is not as good as is normally desirable. It was a recognition of these shortcomings in the spray painting art and the complete lack of a thoroughly satisfactory apparatus for economically and thoroughly cleaning paint spray guns, which led to the conception and development of the present invention.

Accordingly among the objects of the present invention is the provision of a new type of apparatus suitable for the eflicient and economical cleaning of paint spray guns.

Another object is to provide an apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns wherein the same sol vent may be used several times before it is necessary to discard same.

Another object is to provide a paint spray gun cleaning apparatus which not only holds the gun in position for cleaning but permits simultaneously cleaning both the inside and outside of the gun.

Another object is to provide an apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns, and the like, wherein a suitable solvent is sprayed under pressure onto the gun being cleaned so as to not only dissolve the accumulated material thereon, but forcibly flush it away.

Still further objects and advantages of the present invention will appear as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the annexed drawing, and the following description setting forth in detail certain means of carrying out the invention, such disclosed means illustrating, however, but one of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be use-d.

In the annexed drawingz Figure 1 shows a partially sectioned front elevational view of a preferred form of the present cleaning apparatus with the front removed.

Figure 2 shows a top 718W of the apparatus of Figure 1 with the top panel removed.

Figure 3 shows a partially sectioned side elevational view as taken from the right side of Figure 1 with the side and can cleaner removed.

Figure 4 shows an enlarged center sectional View through a preferred form of one of the nozzles used in the present cleaning apparatus.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, it will be noted that the present cleaning apparatus I has a housing 2 with a liquid tight bottom panel 3, and a fluid tight top panel 4. Vent connection 5 may extend upward from top panel 4, or any other convenient location in the upper portion of housing 2, and the showing is intended to be considered as diagrammatic of the various positions it may take within the scope of this invention. The front of the housing is provided with a door 8 which is mounted on hinges 1 and provided with a latch 8. In preferred construction this door would be provided with a conventional gasket (not shown) of synthetic rubber to prevent leakage during operation of the apparatus. Bottom panel 3 of the housing will also be provided with a petcock 9 for use in withdrawing solvent from the apparatus whenever desired. The back panel of the housing 2 is preferably provided with upturned vapor vents ill for a purpose to be hereinafter explained. The whole assembly, when not used as a bench model, is provided with suitable length supporting legs I I.

Pipe 12, connected to a suitable source of air under pressure (not shown), has connect-ed to it valves I3, Hi, and I5 by means of fittings l6, I1, and I8. Valve 13 is connected to a pipe I 9 which extends through the front of housing 2 and thence substantially to the top of same where it forms a return bend member 20 which. is provided with a multiplicity of perforations 2| in its under face for use in blowing solvent ofi of the paint spray gun 22, shown by dotted lines in Figure 3, after same has been cleaned and is ready to be removed from the housing.

Valve I 4 is connected to pipe 23, Figure 8, to which is connected a T-member M on which is mounted an air chuck 25 adapted to receive and hold paint spray gun 22. Nipple 26 connects T-member 24 to a second T-member 2'! which is conventionally joined to both ends of a return bend tube 28 on which are mounted several spray nozzle assemblies 29 by means of tubes 3%.

The spray nozzle assemblies 29, Figure 4, utilize a tubular body member 3! open at its lower end for a purpose to be hereinafter set forth and provided with a nozzle 32 at its upper end. Tube 30, which is of smaller size than tubular body member 3|, preferably extends through the side of same and has its open end directed toward nozzle 32. These nozzle assemblies can be directed at the outer surface of the spray gun from various angles and one of the nozzles is preferably aimed at a splash plate member 33 mounted on the back wall of housing 2, which will direct sprayed cleaning iluid over the nozzle end of the spray gun and paint can cover member 42 of same. A ring member :32, Figure 3, may be used to hold the trigger 40 of the paint spray gun 22 in spraying position, as shown, for a purpose to be hereinafter described.

Mounted on the bottom of a spray gun, when in use, is a can 35, shown by dotted lines in Figures 1 and 2, and in which is placed the paint or other liquid to be sprayed. This can 35 also needs cleaning along with the spray gun andaccordingly a clamp 36 is mounted, as by means of screw 3'1, inside of housing 2 so as to hold the paint can 35 with its open end down. In this position the spraying of cleaning liquid, by means of spray nozzle assemblies 29, willclean and flush the outer face of can 35. The inside of the can is cleaned by means of a spray nozzle 2 9 connected by means of a pipe 38 to valve IS. The upper end of spray nozzle 29 is preferably provided with a spreader member 39 which causes the spray to be fiared outward and to whirl in order to give more rapid cleaning action.

In use, the cleaning apparatus I has its vent connection '5 connected for exhaust through a suitable pipe to the outdoor atmosphere, while pipe 12 is connected to a suitable source of air pressure which, for instance, may be at a gage pressure oi 35 pounds per square inch, although this pressure can vary over .a wide range .and

still be completely satisfactory. The bottom of housing 2 being liquid tight can be filled with a suitable cleaning liquid to a level below the .tops of spray nozzle assemblies 29 and .2 9a. For most purposes, about an inch or two of cleaning .liquid in the bottom of housing 2 will meet ordinary requirements and same will reach approximate- -ly half way to the top .of spray nozzle assemblies 29 and 29*. At the same time, this level should not be higher than the bottom of vapor vents Ill which relieve the section pressure created within housing 2 under operation .of the spray nozzles.

The open lower end oi tubular body member .3! of the spray nozzles .29 and 29 is closely .adjacent but spaced from .bottom panel 3 of housing 2 so that when the air valves [,4 and t5 are opened the air flowing through tubes .30 will-cause a suction effect which will draw the solvent .liq-

uid up through tubular body member 3.! and cause it to be sprayed with the air out of nozzle .32.

To use .the present spray gun cleaning apparatus, the paint spray gun can is first mounted in the position shown in dotted lines in Figures 1 and .2. Removable clz p 34 is then mounted on the paint spray gun 22 to hold the trigger 40 in retracted or spraying position. The gun 22 is then mounted on the air chuck 25 in the position shown in dotted lines in Figure 3 with the paint flow tube 4! extending substantially to the bottom of housing 2. The opening of valve 14 will then force air through paint spray gun 22 and in doing so will draw cleaning fluid up through paint flow tube 4! of the gun and flush out the inside of same. At the same time, air will flow through the spray nozzle assemblies 29 and spray cleaning liquid over the outside of the spray gun to dissolve and flush away the paint which has accumulated thereon. This spraying of course will also clean and fiush paint from the outer surface of can 35.

The opening of valve IS in turn will cause spray nozzle 29 to spray cleaning fluid into the inside of the can to clean and. flush same. Both valves I 4 and I5 can be operated simultaneously if desired, and under actual practice the cleaning of a spray gun and can, in most cases, can be accomplished very thoroughly in less than a minute. Valves l4 and I5 will then be closed and valve l3 opened to blow air through return bend pipe 20 and perforations 2|, onto the paint spray gun 2-2 to quickly dry same ready for removal through door 6. After the cleaning fluid has become sufiiciently contaminated with paint and the like, it can be withdrawn through petcock 9 and discarded, following which a fresh supply of cleaning fluid can be placed in housing .2 so as to be ready for use once more.

A divisional application covering the method involved herein has been filed under date of February 18, 1954, Serial Number 411,087.

Other modes of applying the principle of my invention may be employed instead of the one explained, change being made as regards the means herein disclosed, provided those stated .by any of the following claims or their equivalent be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinct- 1y claim as my invention:

1. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like, which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an air chuck withinsaid chamber and on which a paint spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube within said chamber, spray nozzles mounted .on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, an air supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to said air chuck and to said spray nozzles through said tube on which they are mounted.

2. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like, which comprises a closed chamber having a liquid tight bottom .for holding .a suitable solvent liquid, a vent connection to said chamber, door means in the upper portion of said chamber for egress and ingress thereinto, an air chuck within said chamber and on which .a paint spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube within the lower portion of said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, an air supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to said air chuck and to said spray nozzles through said tube on which they are mounted.

3. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like, which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an outlet vent connected to the upper portion of said chamber, an inlet vent connected to the lower portion of said chamber, said inlet vent being spaced a short distance above the bottom of said chamber and being in the form of an outside upturned passageway having the inlet thereto substantially above the connection of the inlet vent into said chamber, an air chuck within said chamber and on which a paint spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube within said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, a supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure above atmospheric, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to said air chuck and said spray nozzles through said tube on which they are mounted.

4. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like, which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an air chuck within said chamber and on which a paint spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube in the lowerportion of said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, a tube in the upper portion of said chamber, said second tube being provided with openings in its lower face, an air supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to said perforated tube in the upper portion of said chamber, and to said air chuck and said spray nozzles through said tube on which they are mounted.

5. An appaartus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an air chuck within said chamber and on which a paint spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube in the lower portion of said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, a clamp member within said chamber for holding the paint spray gun can in inverted position for cleaning, a second tube in the bottom portion of said chamber, a spray nozzle mounted on said second tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber into said can, an air supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source oi air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to the pipe leading to the can cleaning nozzle, and to said air chuck and said spray nozzles through said first named tube on which they are mounted.

6. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like, which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an air chuck within said chamber and on which a spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube in the lower portion of said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, a tube in the upper portion of said chamber, said tube being provided with openings in its lower face for blowing air onto said gun after same has been sprayed, a vent pipe connected to the upper portion of said chamber, door means in the upper portion of said chamber for egress and ingress thereinto, an air supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to said perforated tube in the upper portion of said cha1nber,'and to said air chuck and said spray nozzles through said tube on which they are mounted.

'7. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an air chuck within said chamber and on which a paint spray gun can be mounted, with the paint fiow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube in the lower portion of said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, a tube in the upper portion of said chamber, said second tube being provided with opemngs in its IOWer face for blow ing air onto said gun after same has been sprayed, a clamp member within said chamber for holding a paint spray gun can in inverted position for cleaning, a third tube in the bottom portion of said chamber, a spray nozzle mounted on said third tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber into said can, an air supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air suppl pipe to the tube in the upper portion of said chamber as well as to the tube leading to the can cleaning nozzle, and to said air chuck and said spray nozzles through the first named tube in the bottom portion of said chamber and on which they are mounted.

8. An apparatus for cleaning paint spray guns and the like which comprises a chamber having a liquid tight bottom for holding a suitable solvent liquid, an air chuck within said chamber and on which a spray gun can be mounted with the paint flow tube of the gun extending substantially to the bottom of said chamber, a tube in the lower portion of said chamber, spray nozzles mounted on said tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber onto said gun, a tube in the upper portion of said chamber, said second tube being provided with openings in its lower face for blowing air onto said gun after same has been sprayed, a clamp member within said chamber for holding a Paint spray gun can in inverted position for cleaning, a third tube in the bottom portion of said chamber, a spray nozzle mounted on said third tube and connected to spray solvent liquid from the bottom of said chamber into said can, a vent pipe connected to the upper portion of said chamber, a tightly closeable door means in the upper portion of said chamber for egress and ingress thereinto, a supply pipe adapted to be connected to a suitable source of air under pressure, and valve means for connecting said air supply pipe to said perforated tube in the upper portion of said chamber, as well as to the tube leading to the can cleaning nozzle, and to said airchuck and said spray nozzles through said first named tube in the bottom portion of said chamber and on which they are mounted.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 843,555 Weymar Feb. 5, 1907 1,438,834 Keil Dec. 12, 1922 1,765,557 Wright June 24, 1930 2,023,496 Rodd Dec. 10, 1935 2,241,144 Lattin May 6, 1941 2,245,892 Anschicks et a1. June 17, 1941 2,309,251 Little ,l Jan. 26, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US843555 *Nov 3, 1904Feb 5, 1907Emil WeymarProcess for cleaning bottles and the like.
US1438834 *Apr 19, 1921Dec 12, 1922Ernst KeilSpark-plug cleaner
US1765557 *May 5, 1928Jun 24, 1930Wright Kirk KApparatus for cleaning bottles
US2023496 *Mar 12, 1928Dec 10, 1935Todd Verne JMethod for cleaning oil-covered surfaces
US2241144 *Jan 26, 1939May 6, 1941Lattin George EWasher for milk test bottles
US2245892 *Jan 3, 1939Jun 17, 1941Protectoseal CoSpray gun container
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3771539 *May 19, 1972Nov 13, 1973De Santis BPaint gun cleaner
US4785836 *Jul 17, 1987Nov 22, 1988Soichiro YamamotoSpray washer
US4827955 *Jan 14, 1987May 9, 1989Stern Leif EDevice for cleaning paint distributing channels in spray guns
US4899769 *Oct 13, 1988Feb 13, 1990Tsai Mu Yuan TPaint spray-gun cleaner
US5174317 *Jun 7, 1989Dec 29, 1992Herkules Equipment CorporationSpray gun and associate parts washer and recycler
US5201331 *Mar 8, 1991Apr 13, 1993R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co.Vapor containment apparatus and method
US5388601 *Mar 15, 1994Feb 14, 1995Mansur; Pierre G.Spray gun washing apparatus
US5549128 *Feb 24, 1995Aug 27, 1996Mansur Industries Inc.General parts washer
US5669401 *Sep 22, 1995Sep 23, 1997Mansur Industries Inc.General washer apparatus
US5704381 *Jan 25, 1996Jan 6, 1998Northrop Grumman CorporationEnclosed spray gun and accessories cleaning apparatus
US5937875 *Sep 30, 1996Aug 17, 1999Nygren; RichardApparatus and method for cleaning sprayers
US6732751 *Dec 21, 2001May 11, 2004Chia Chung Enterprise Co., Ltd.Automatic cleaning apparatus for paint sprayer gun
US6860278 *Mar 18, 2002Mar 1, 2005Chia Chung Enterprise Co., Ltd.Clean-up equipment of the spraying paint gun
US7128539 *May 31, 2002Oct 31, 2006Titan Tool, IncMethod for improved cleaning of a pumping system
WO1995024978A1 *Mar 6, 1995Sep 21, 1995Mansur Ind IncSpray gun washing apparatus
WO2008022764A1 *Aug 21, 2007Feb 28, 2008Volkswagen AgCleaning apparatus for sprayers, in particular spray guns, and method for cleaning a sprayer
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/102.1, 134/170, 134/171, 134/103.2, 134/200
International ClassificationB44D3/00, B05B15/02
Cooperative ClassificationB44D3/006, B05B15/0258
European ClassificationB44D3/00D, B05B15/02B3