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Publication numberUS2682682 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1954
Filing dateFeb 16, 1953
Priority dateFeb 16, 1953
Publication numberUS 2682682 A, US 2682682A, US-A-2682682, US2682682 A, US2682682A
InventorsAlex M Lewyt, Carl E Meyerhoefer
Original AssigneeLewyt Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction nozzle with brush
US 2682682 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. M. LEWYT ETAL 2,682,682

SUCTION NOZZLE WITH BRUSH Original Filed Feb. 1, 1947 July 6, 1954 -2 Sheets-Sheet'l PEN'HHHI HUI HI) I" f om s M m awwo W w x5 A him fir m B y 1954 A. M. LEWYT ETAL SUCTION NOZZLE WITH BRUSH 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed Feb. 1. 1947 INVENTORS yarae/kr ATTORNEYS Patented July 6, 1954 SUCTION NOZZLE WITH BRUSH Alex M. Lewyt, New York, and Carl E. Meyerhoefer, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignors to Lewyt Corporation, Brooklyn, N. Y., a corporation of New York Continuation of abandoned application Serial No. 725,890, February 1, 1947. This application February 16, 1953, Serial No. 337,036

4 Claims. (01. -339) This invention relates to a structurally and functionally improved nozzle and brush assembly and especially a nozzle which will be advantageous for use with a suction or vacuum cleaning apparatus.

It is an object of the invention to provide an assembly of this character which will be especially useful when employed on rugs and other floor coverings; the assembly being capable of having its parts adjusted so that they will cooperate to best advantage with the particular type of floor covering which is being cleaned.

A further object is that of furnishing a unit of this type which may readily be manipulated or adjusted by an inexperienced operator. This adjustment may be accomplished without a detailed visual inspection'of the parts and with a minimum of effort.

A still further object is that of providing a nozzle and brush structure and in which the brush is floatingly mounted. In accordance with the present teachings, such mounting will nevertheless serve to maintain the brush in a position substantially parallel to the intake axis of the nozzle. However, as a consequence of the mounting, the brush may assume a position tilted with respect to a transverse axis. This will permit it to conform to any inequalities of the surface which is being traversed and assure a proper and thorough cooperation of the brush with that surface.

An additional object is that of providing an assembly of this nature and in which the brush will be substantially self-cleaning when the assembly is in use. In other words, the brush may pick up thread and lint in the usual manner. However, due to the teachings of the present invention, these foreign materials will be automatically transferred to the suction apparatus. Therefore, the brush will at all times remain usable.

Another object is that of designing a unit which 7 will include relatively few parts, each individually simple and rugged in construction; such parts being capable of ready manufacture by quantity production methods and being moreover capable of being assembled by relatively unskilled labor. When so assembled a unit is furnished which will operate over long periods of time with freedom from all difficulties.

With these and other objects in mind, reference is had to the attached sheets of drawings illustrating practical embodiments of the invention .and in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of an assembly;

Fig. 2 is a partly sectional rear View thereof, taken along the lines 22 and in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 4;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 and in the direction of the arrows as also indicated in Fig. 4;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged transverse sectional view of the assembly;

Fig. 5 is a sectional plan view taken along the lines 55 and in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but showing an alternate form of construction;

Fig. '7 is a transverse sectional view taken along the lines 1-! and in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 6; and

Fig. 8 is a transverse sectional View taken along the lines 88 and in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 1 and illustrating particularly the positions which the brush is capable of assuming.

7 Referring primarily to Figs. 1 to 5, it will be seen that the reference numeral [0 indicates a hollow body to which a guard strip of rubber H or similar material may be secured. As shown the body In includes spaced main, front and rear walls through which air may flow. The underface of this body is hollow and is preferably defined by a sole plate IV which may have a chrome finish or be formed of highly polished metal such as stainless steel body.

As is shown, especially in Figs. 3 and 4, the' plate l2 may be extended in the form of contact portions [2' for engagement with the surface being traversed. These contact portions are disposed adjacent the opposite ends of the body It! and extend from the underface thereof. Substantially in line with the apex portion 13 of the body I0, this plate maybe disposed in the form of a. tubular part ll. Ridges [8 may define the zone between the contact portions l2 and the tubular part H. The rear wall of body It prevents rearward movement of this tubular part.

The body It! has an apex portion I3 terminating in a hub l5. Extending within the latter, as shown in Fig. 4, is a tube I4 which may be rotatable with respect to the hub. Inward movement of the tube I4 beyond the point illustrated is prevented by a flange l6. Outward movement thereof is prevented in a manner hereinafter brought out.

This tube l4 may have an angularly offset rear portion and is provided with a groove. Within the latter, a gasket [6' may be disposed. This gasket will serve to seal the parts against air aesacs leakage. Also it will provide a friction element which will restrain undesired swiveling of the parts.

Rearwardly of the tube H the plate l2 may be interrupted by a slot. Extending through the latter is a brush comprising tufts of hair it and a backing strip 26. Bearing against this backing strip are coil springs 21, whichtend to project the brush. Preferably the tufts of the latter normally extend in directions substantially parallel to the axis of tubular portion ii. The movement of the brush, as it is projected or retracted, is also preferably in such direction. A plate 22 is disposed to the rear of the brush and springs; this plate in sheet furnishing the rear wall for the body I!) and providing in conjunction with the adjacent surfaces a brush well.

A collar 23 encircles the hub l and is rotatable with respect thereto. This collar has an inwardly extending flange 24 which bears against a rib 25, forming a part of tube i4. Collar 23 is restrained against rearward movement with respect to the parts in that plate 22 bears against the same; this plate being secured as a part of the nozzle assembly. The tube It being maintained by the collar 23, it follows that the rearward movement of the tube 14 is prevented althrough the latter will be free to swivel. A further extension as forms a part of flange 24. This extension, as shown especially in Fig. 2, presents a series of notches 2i in its inner face. ihese notches are connected by inclined surfaces which in aggregate define a cam portion.

As shown in Fig. 1 the ring 23 is also provided with a forward extension 28 brought into alignment with indicating marks 29. The latter are associated with the body N3; the extension 28 transversing this indica as the ring 23 is rotated.

A plate 38 is mounted for sliding movement,

preferably in the same space which receives the brush. Such mounting may be achieved, as shown in Fig. 5, by providing guiding portions 3! in the form of strips secured to the rear face of body iii. These guiding portions in eifect furnish tracks to confine movements of the plate 35 to directions substantially parallel to the axis of tube 5?. As will also be seen in this view, the body it may be extended rearwardly as 32, to in effect furnish well portions to receive the upper ends of the springs 2 i.

The plate 3% has its center portion notched or recessed as shown in Fig. 2. Extending rearwardly from this edge portion is a preferably integral part 33. The latter rides in contact with the notches 2'5 and surfaces extending between the same. The lower edge of plate 38 may be bent outwardly at a pair of spaced points. This has been indicated at 33. These outward extensions conveniently project into the tufts i9 and underlie the backing strip 263.

As will be apparent the tube is may be connected to the wand or hose of a vacuum cleaning apparatus and the contact portions 12' of the plate 12 may ride in engagement with the surface to be cleaned. Under such circumstances the dust carrying air will be drawn past the ridges of lip portions l8, through the tube ll, towards the apex I3 of the body it. This air will then flow rearwardly through the tube It. As afore brought out, the latter is swiveled so that freedom of movement of the several parts will be permitted. Under such circumstances it will be assumed that the brush is retracted within the which may be space between the rear wall of the body and plate 22.

Should the surface to be cleaned be of such nature that a brush should cooperate therewith, then the operator may simply rotate ring 23. With such rotation the extension 33, which has heretofore been resting within the extreme right end notch 21, as viewed in Fig. 2, will ride over the inclined surface to the next adjacent notch. Under the influence of springs 21 the brush will be projected as the extensions 33 lower to permit of this projection. As is apparent, the thrust of the springs 2| will be transmitted through these extensions 33' to the plate 38 and thus to the extension 33. The latter will, therefore, remain in firm contact with the face of the cam portion. Accordingly the brush will be protected beyond the plane of the contact portions l2. This will assure a cooperation of the brush with the surface being cleaned. If a more vigorous engagement of the part is desired then continued rotation of the part of the ring 23 will allow that notched portion 2'! which appears in the extreme left end of Fig. 2 to receive the extension 33. This distance between this notched portion and the center of the tube 14 being greatest, it follows that a corresponding projection of the brush will result. W'hile only three notched portions 21 have been illustrated, it is apparent that a greater or lesser number of the same might be provided.

The same result is achieved by the form of construction shown in Figs. 6 and 7. In these views the numeral 3 indicates the body of the nozzle, which is formed with the usual opening defining its under-face and this passages communicating with an apex portion in line with which a tubular part 38 is disposed. This tube may bear against an inner retaining ring 31 to limit its inward movement. An outer retaining ring 38 may encircle the tube 36 and be secured to the rear face of body 34 in a manner such as is indicated at 39. A plate ii] is secured to the rear edges of the body 34 at a point spaced from the nozzle portion 35 to provide a brush well.

Disposed within this space is a brush including a row of tufts or fibers 4! and a backing strip s2. A support 43 in the form of a plate, is slidably mounted between guides or rails 44. Leaf springs 45, conveniently in the form of inverted Vs bear adjacent their ends against the upper edge of the backing strip 42. The apices of these springs may have bearing in abutments it, formed in the body 34. Extensions 4! may form parts of the plate or shifting member 63 and extend in supporting relationship with respect to the backing strip.

It will be understood that the springs 45 will normally urge the brush to a projected position. The brush will be restrained from such movementby the extensions 41. A ring 48 may encircle the over-lapping portions of body 34 and the tube 36 and be rotatable with respect to the same. This ring may support a housing portion 69, the inner surface of which is cam-shaped and tangentially disposed. This permits operations similar to those heretofore described under the reference numeral 27, in Fig. 2. An extension 50 forms a part of the actuator or plate i3 and rides within the surface of the housing 49. Therefore, the projecting tendency of the spring 45 is restrained. However, by rotating the ring 48 agreater or less projection of the brush may be assured.

It will be understood that in'both of the illustra'ted embodiments the spring or springs are normally tending to project the brush. The cam structure serves to retract the same. Obviously, the parts can be arranged so that the reverse would be true. However, it is preferred that the functioning of the parts be as illustrated. Aside from other advantages, by having the springs normally tending to project the brush, any blow or strain on the latter will be cushioned. In other words, a force suflicient to cause the brush to retract will effect a withdrawal of the same into thenozzle bodyto a greater or lesser extent. Accordingly the probability of damage occurring willibe reduced to a minimum.

As will also be apparent with respect to the brush, it may tilt around an axis transverse with respect to its body. In other words, in view of the manner in which it is supported, it will normally have .its lower edge substantially parallel to the lower edge portions of the nozzle. However, if due to inequalities of the surface or otherwise more pressure is exerted against one end of the brush than against the other, the former end will be tilted upwardly. As soon as'the pressure is relieved the parts will re-assume their normal positions.

Finally, with respect to this particular portion of the assembly, it will be observed as in both Figs. 4 and 7, that the brush is supported in a manner such that it may-within limitsmove in any desired direction. I In addition to the action brought out in the preceding paragraphs which results follow from this construction, it is apparent that the brush may incline or rock around its longitudinal-axis. This has been gen- 'erally indicated in Fig. 8. In that view there has been indicated the two different positions which the brush may assume incident to such pivoting. Position A is the one which the brush will normally assume when the nozzle is being moved in a forward direction, or in other words to the left as in this figure. When a rear stroke is undertaken then the brush will assume position B. As will be appreciated in connection with position A, the brush may readily pick up materials from the surface being cleaned. These may include dust particles, thread, lint, etc. When, however, the brush is traversing a surface and assumes position B, the tufts assume an inclined or tipped position. Under these circumstances and in cooperation with the surface being cleaned, lint, thread and other materials will be stripped from the tufts. These materials as freed will be drawn into the nozzle and so into the suction apparatus,

connected therewith.

Thus, among others, the several objects of the invention as specifically afore stated are achieved. Obviously numerous changes in construction and rearrangement of the parts might be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims.

This application is a continuation of our prior application for United States Letters Patent Serial No. 725,890 filed February 1, 1947 and now abandoned.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination spaced front and rear walls connected to each other adjacent their upper and side edges to provide a hollow nozzle body the lower edges of which define an intake mouth. an outlet hub extending rearwardly from said body and communicating with the hollow interior thereof, a collar rotatably encircling said hub, an extension forming a part of said collar and providing an upwardly facing cam surface, a

brush and a plate mounted for sliding movement adjacent the outer face of said rear wall, an upper extension projecting laterally from said plate, a lower extension also projecting laterally from said plate, the lower of said extensions supporting said brush to restrain the same from downward movement, the upper of said exten sions engaging said cam surface to have sliding movement with respect thereto, a spring bearing against said nozzle body and brush to urge the latter downwardly in the direction of the nozzle mouth and into firm contact with the lower plate extension supporting it, the plate being thereby urged in a corresponding direction and. the upper extension of said plate accordingly bearing in sliding and firm contact with the cam surface.

2. In combination spaced front and rear walls connected to each other adjacent their upper and side edges to provide a hollow nozzle body the lower edges of which define an intake month, an outlet hub extending rearwardly from said body and communicating with the hollow interior thereof, a collar rotatably encircling said hub, an extension forming a part of said collar and pro-- viding an upwardly facing cam surface, a brush and a plate mounted for sliding movement adjacent the outer face of said rear wall, an upper extension projecting laterally from said plate, a lower extension also projecting laterally from said plate, the lower of said extensions supporting said brush to restrain the same from downward movement, the upper of said extensions engaging said cam surface to have sliding movement with respect thereto, a spring bearing against said nozzle body and brush to urge the latter downwardly in the direction of the nozzle mouth and into firm contact with the lower plate extension supporting it, the plate being thereby urged in a corresponding direction, the upper extension of said plate accordingly bearing in sliding and firm contact with the cam surface and a closure plate secured to said nozzle body to the rear of said slidable plate and brush, said closure plate bearing against a collar surface to retain the same position upon said hub.

3. In combination spaced front and rear walls I connected to each other adjacent their upper and side edges to provide a hollow nozzle body the lower edges of which define an intake mouth, an outlet hub extending rearwardly from said body and communicating with the hollow interior thereof, a collar rotatably encircling said hub, an extension forming a part of said collar and providing an upwardly facing cam surface, a brush and a plate mounted for sliding movement adjacent the outer face of said rear wall, an upper extension projecting laterally from said plate, a lower extension also projecting laterally from said plate, the lower of said extensions supportin said brush to restrain the same from downward movement, the upper of said extensions engaging said cam surface to have sliding movement with respect thereto, a spring bearing against said nozzle body and brush to urge the latter downwardly in the direction of the nozzle mouth and into firm contact with th lower plate extension supporting it, the plate being thereby urged in a corresponding direction, the upper extension of said plate accordingly bearing in sliding and. firm contact with the cam surface and an extension forming a part of said collar adjacent the upper portion thereof and projecting in the direction of said front wall to traverse the surface of said nozzle body and indicate the position in which said brush is retained by said spring and cam surface.

4. In combination spaced front and rear walls connected to each other adjacent theinupper and side edges to provide a hollow nozzle body the lower edges of which defin an intake mouth, an outlet hub extending rearwardly from said body and communicating with the hollow interior thereof, a collar rotatably encircling said hub, an extension forming a part of said collar and providing an upwardly facing cam surface, a brush and a plate mounted for sliding movement adjacent the outer face or said rear wall, an upper extension projecting laterally from said plate, a lower extension also projecting laterally from said plate, the lower of said extensions supporting said brush to restrain the same from downward movement, the upper of said extensions engaging said cam surface to have sliding movement with respect thereto, spring strips disposed in the .form of inverted Vs, the arms of said springs bearing against said brush and the crotch portions thereof being supported by said body to urge said brush downwardly in the direction 8v of the nozzle mouth and into firm contact with the lower plate extension supporting it, the plate being thereby urged in a corresponding direction and the upper extension of said plate accordingly bearing in sliding and firm contact with the cam surface.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,413,545 Throop l Apr. 1-8, 1922 1,462,971 Rieman July 17, 1923 1,483,972 Hoover ..'a Feb. 19, 1924 1,884,044 Martirlet Oct. 25', 1932 2,153,457 Fechtenburg Apr, 4, 1939 2,205,82 Dunbar June 25, 1940 2,310,554 Seyfried Feb. 9, 1943 2,314,081 Dow et al Mar. 16,1943 2,520,506 Weiland Dec, 9, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 213,420 Switzerland May 1, 1941 217,208 Switzerland r Jan. 16, 1942

Patent Citations
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US1462071 *Jul 18, 1921Jul 17, 1923Rieman PaulVacuum cleaner
US1483972 *Jun 10, 1918Feb 19, 1924Hoover CoSuction cleaner
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2706826 *Oct 4, 1949Apr 26, 1955Martin Parry CorpSuction cleaner floor tool
US2734215 *Mar 21, 1950Feb 14, 1956 wilson
US2841812 *Mar 23, 1956Jul 8, 1958Landers Frary & ClarkTank type vacuum cleaner nozzle
US2893048 *Apr 21, 1955Jul 7, 1959Health Mor IncSuction cleaner nozzle construction for cleaning cotton rugs
US2946079 *Sep 16, 1957Jul 26, 1960Kingston Products CorpSuction tool for vacuum cleaners
US2961689 *Oct 25, 1957Nov 29, 1960Lewyt CorpVacuum cleaner nozzle
US2974347 *Sep 8, 1959Mar 14, 1961Scovill Manufacturing CoSuction cleaner nozzle
US3040364 *Nov 26, 1957Jun 26, 1962Electrolux AbMulti-purpose suction cleaner nozzle
US3040367 *Sep 24, 1958Jun 26, 1962Electrolux AbMulti-purpose suction nozzle
US3137884 *Mar 12, 1963Jun 23, 1964Regina CorpVacuum cleaner nozzle
US3203023 *Nov 6, 1964Aug 31, 1965Sunbeam CorpCleaning attachment for vacuum cleaner
US3204282 *Feb 7, 1963Sep 7, 1965Pul Vac IncSuction actuated head
US5383252 *Jan 18, 1994Jan 24, 1995White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Vacuum cleaner with improved assembly
DE1151099B *Mar 10, 1961Jul 4, 1963Siemens Elektrogeraete GmbhStaubsaugerduese mit verstellbarem Buersteneinsatz
DE1183646B *Apr 30, 1959Dec 17, 1964Licentia GmbhSchwenkduese fuer Staubsauger
DE1259032B *Feb 17, 1965Jan 18, 1968Siemens Elektrogeraete GmbhDuese fuer Staubsauger
DE4112394C2 *Apr 16, 1991Nov 21, 2002Heinz FritzeAufsteckvorrichtung für einen Staubsauger
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/339, 15/325, 15/373, 15/371
International ClassificationA47L9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/0653, A47L9/0613
European ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/06C2C, A47L9/06B2