Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2682913 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1954
Filing dateSep 2, 1952
Priority dateSep 2, 1952
Publication numberUS 2682913 A, US 2682913A, US-A-2682913, US2682913 A, US2682913A
InventorsBruce W Manternach
Original AssigneeElizabeth J Scheide
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible hospital chair
US 2682913 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 6, 1954 Filed Sept. 2, 1952 B. SCHEIDE CONVERTIBLE HOSPITAL CHAIR 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR LESTER 55w SCHE/DE BY /4,% M/

ATTORNEY y 1954 L. B. SCHEIDE CQNVERTIBLE HOSPITAL CHAIR 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 2, 1952 IN l/EN 70/? A 7' TORNE Y LESTER BEACH SCHE/DE llll| l l l l L ll July 6, 1954 B. SCHEIDE CONVERTIBLE HOSPITAL CHAIR 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Sept.' 2, 1952 INVENTOR LESTER BEACH SCHE/DE ATTORNEY Patented July 6, 1954 ATENT OFFICE CONVERTIBLE HOSPITAL CHAIR Lester Beach Scheide, Hartford, Conn. Bruce W. Manternach; executor of said Lester Beach Scheide, deceased, assignor to Elizabeth J.

Scheide, Lyme, Conn.

Application September 2, 1952, Serial No. 307,449

17 Claims.

The invention relates to a convertible stretcher and chair for use in hospitals, this for convenience and brevity being sometimes referred to as a convertible hospitalchair. A convertible stretcher and chair embodying the invention has its parts relatively movable so that in one position they constitute a stretcher at a level approximating that of a hospital bed and so that in another position they constitute a chair for the convenient and comfortable use of a patient.

With the parts in the stretcher position a paraplegic or other patient can be readily transferred from the bed to the stretcher without any carrying or lifting of the patient. Then the parts are moved to'the chair position, the patient being thus moved to a sitting position without any effort by the patient and with only a small effort by the attendant. When the patient is to be returned to bed the described procedure is reversed.

The general object of the invention is to provide a convertible stretcher and chair of the type described having various advantageous features of construction and arrangement. These features facilitate conversion from the stretcher position to the chair position and vice versa, they serve to firmly support the parts in each of the said positions, and they provide simplicity. and economy of manufacture. Various other advantages will be apparent from the following more specific description.

In the drawings I have shown in detail a pre- -ferred embodiment of the invention, but it will be understood that'various changes may be made from the construction shown, and that the drawings are not to be construed-as defining or limiting the scope of the invention, the claims forming a part of this specification being relied upon for that purpose.

Of the drawings:

Figll is an isometric view of a convertible chair embodying the invention, the parts being in the position to constitute a chair.

Fig. 2 is an isometric view similar to Fig. l but with the parts in the position to constitute a stretcher.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken along the line 3--3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view through the center, this view showing the parts in the same position as in Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5 but showing the parts in the same position as in Fig, 1.

Fig. '7 is a fragmentary view similar to the left portion of Fig. 6 but showing one of leg supports in an elevated position.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary plan view of some of the parts shown in Fig. 3, certain cover parts being omitted for clarity of illustration.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view similar to a portion of Fig. 8 and with certain parts in horizontal section.

Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary View partly in section along the line lfllt of Fig. 8.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary elevational view taken in the direction of the arrows H, I I in Fig. 10.

F g. 12 is a fragmentary left side view showing one of the foot rests and the supporting means therefor.

Fig. 13 is a view similar to Fig. 12 but showing some of the parts in different positions.

Referring to the drawings and more particularly Figs. 1 and 2, the main supporting frame of the convertible chair is indicated generally by IE3. This frame preferably comprises suitably connected pipes or tubes and may be varied widel as to details. The several tubes may be connected with each other in any suitable manner, but for convenience of illustration and dehorizontal structure at its bottom, this horizontal structure comprising longitudinal lower side members l2, l2 and a transverse lower front member 14 between the two side members. The members l2, l2 and It may be formed from a single tube properly bent. A transverse memher it is secured to the members [2, l2 and is spaced rearwardly from the frontmember l4. A second transverse member I8 is secured to the side members 12, I2 and is spaced rearwardly from the transverse member l6. Connected with the side members [2, l2 adjacent the transverse member I6 are stub axles for two main supporting wheels 22, 22. The rear portions of the longitudinal members l2, [2 are curved downwardly,

Connected with the longitudinal members I2, l2 are oppositely disposed upright members 26, preferably directly above the transverse member I6. Also connected with the longitudinal members l2, l2 are oppositely disposed upright members 28, 28 spaced rearwardly from the members 2'6, 26 and preferably directly above the transverse member [8. Generally horizontal upper side members 3D, are provided, these being connected with the upper ends of the upright members 26, 26 and 28, 28 and extending said vertical guide rods 68, 98.

rearwardly from the said members 28, 28. The said longitudinal side members 39, 30 preferably have upwardly ofiset portions 32, 32 which are connected at the rear by a transverse member 34. Another transverse member 36 is preferably also provided, this being spaced forwardly from the member 34. The members 26, 26, the members 30, 30 and the member 34 may be formed from a single tube properly bent.

The rear portions of the lower and upper members i2 and til at each side are connected with each other by a curved member 38 having a reinforcing connection 40 with the corresponding upright member 28. The curved members 38 at the two sides are connected with each other by a transverse member 42. Connected with the rear portions of the members I2, I 2 and the lower portions of the members 30, 30 are caster wheels 44, 44 swiveled for movement about vertical axis. These caster wheels cooperate with the main wheels 22, 22 for supporting the entire convertible chair.

Extending between the two upright members 26 is a transverse member 45. Extending between the two upright members 23 is a transverse member 46 at the same level as the member 45. Extending between the upright members 26 and 28 at each side are horizontal longitudinal members 48 and 56, the lower member 48 at each side being at the same level as the transverse members 45 and 46. The members 48 and 50 are connected with each other and with the upper side member at by upright members 52 and 54.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 5, 6 and 8, a vertically movable seat unit 55 is provided, this includin a rectangular frame which oomprises side members 55, 56 and rear and front transverse members 53 and The side members 5B, 55 are so spaced that they are movable vertically between the upright members 26, 26 and it, 28 and the side members 30, 39. The transverse member 58 is preferably spaced slightly forwardly from the upright members 28, 26, and the transverse member Gil is preferably spaced slightly rearwardly from the upright members 28, 228. The said members 56, 58, 5t and (it! may be formed from a single tube properly bent. Connected with the rectangular seat frame is a metal plate 62 which is the frame members at the bottoms thereof.

The seat unit 55 is guided for movement with respect to the frame along substantially vertical lines either to a lower position as shown in Figs. 1 and 6 or to an upper position as shown in Figs. 2 and 5. The means for guiding the seat unit may be varied, but the said means as shown includes vertical guide rods 58, 68 and vertical guides ill, ID for the said rods. A rectangular casting 64 is connected with the main frame members 45, 46 and 48, 48 and a horizontal plate 66 is connected with the main frame members I6, I8 and I2, i2. Connected with the seat plate 62 and extending downwardly therefrom are the The casting 64 and the plate 68 have holes through which the rods can extend. There are preferably four guide rods respectively adjacent the corners of the plate 62. Extending between the casting 64 and the plate 66 and secured to at least one of them are the said vertical guides ID, If! which are preferably tubes into or through which the guide rods 68, 68 extend. The tubes closely fit the rods so that the seat unit is guided for straight-line vertical movement.

referably tangent to Means is provided for moving the seat unit downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, this means acting directly on the seat unit independently of any other parts.

The said means for moving the seat unit 55 preferably includes a substantially vertical screw I2 below the seat unit and connected therewith and also includes a nut I4 having threaded engagement with the screw and held against vertical movement'with respect to the supporting frame. The screw I2 is preferably non-rotatable and is rigidly connected at its upper end with the plate 82, the said screw bein adapted to extend through an opening in the casting 64 and through a hole in the plate 66. Surrounding and having threaded engagement with the screw 72 is a sleeve which constitutes the said nut I l. The sleeve 74 is rotatable in a downwardly extendingbearing portion of the casting 64, and it is supported by an anti-friction bearing '56 interposed between the bottom of the sleeve and the plate 66. Secured to the sleeve 74 and located within a gear chamber in the casting 64 is a bevel gear 18 which meshes with a bevel gear til also lo cated within the said gear chamber. The gear 83 is secured to a horizontal rearwardly extending shaft 82 rotatable in bearing apertures in the casting 54. The gear chamber in the casting 85 may be closed at the top by a cover plate 84. Preferably a depending cup 86 is connected to the plate 66, the cup being of such depth as to provide room for the screw I2 to move to its lowermost position. The cup 86 serves to protect the screw and to prevent the dropping of oil.

Connected with the shaft 82 and longitudinally adjustable thereon is a sleeve 88 havin a crank 90 at its rear end. The sleeve 88 and the crank 90 can be in their forward positions when not in use and can be moved rearwardly for use, the crank then being more conveniently accessible. Rotation of the crank serves to rotate the bevel gears 80 and I8 and the sleeve or nut I i. By reason of the rotation of the nut, the screw 12 is raised or lowered to raise or lower the seat unit 55. Fig. 5 shows the seat unit in its upper position and Fig. 6 shows the said unit in its lower position.

A unit indicated generally at 92 is provided for supporting the back of the patient, this unit being pivotally connected with the seat unit 55 near the rear thereof for relative movement about a transverse horizontal axis. The back unit com prises two side members 9 94 and a rear member 96, all of which may be formed from a single tube properly bent. The details of the pivotal connection between the seat unit and the back unit may be widely varied, but as shown in Fig. 8 a tube 93 is welded to the rear member ti] of the seat unit. Connected respectively with the side members 94, 94 of the back unit are two tubes I03, Hill which align with the tube 538. A pin or rod I02 extends through the three tubes 98, the, I00 and serves as a pivotal support for the back unit. It will be observed that the main portions of the members 94, 94 of the back unit are substantially in longitudinal register with the side members 56, 56 of the seat unit.

A stationary support for the back unit is carried by the'supporting frame, this support being in engagement with the back unit at the bottom thereof and at the rear of its pivotal connection with the seat unit. This stationary support is positioned to cause the back unit to relatively move pivotally in the upward direction when the seat unit is moved downwardly to its lower position,

the said support permitting the back unit to move pivotally in the downward direction back to its horizontal position when the seat unit is moved upwardly back to its upper position.

Preferably the said stationary support comprises at least one generally horizontal and longitudinally extending track or track member. As shown, there are two transversely spaced track members I04 secured respectively to the side members 39, 3% of the main frame and at the inner sides thereof. Each track member I04 may be channel shaped in cross section as shown in Fig. 4, and it may be closed at the rear by a member I06 asshown in Fig. 1. The back unit includes at least one roller I08 engageable with the upper face of a corresponding track member, and preferably there are two rollers I08 spaced for engagement with the two track members IE4. The rollers 28 are secured to the side members 94, 9:; of the back unit as shown in Fig. 4, and they enable the track members to support the said back. unit. When the seat unit 55 is in its uppermost position, as shown by full lines in Figs. 2 and 5, the track members I04 support the back unit in a horizontal position as shown. In this position the back unit may be additionally supported by the rear member 34 of the main frame, the side members 94, 94 of the back unit being in direct engagement with the said rear frame member. The member or support 34 is spaced rearwardly from the track members I04 and it constitutes a second support for the back unit.

When the crank 90 is turned to rotate the nut hi, the seat unit 55 is lowered from the position shown in Fig. 5 to the position shown in Fig. 6. As the seat unit is moved downwardly the rollers we travel forwardly along the track members Iii i and the back unit 92 is forced to move pivotally in the upward direction to an inclined positionas shown in Figs; 1 and 6, the angle of inclination preferably being about 60 from the horizontal. Preferably the track members I94 have downward offsets or depressions near their forward ends at IIIl into which the rollers its move when the seat unit reaches itslowermost 7 position and when the back unit has been moved pivotally to the maximum extent. These depressions assist in holding the back unit in its inclined position. When the seat unit 55 is moved upwardly from. its lower position to its upper position, the described movements arereversed and the back unit 92 is restored to its horizontal position.

A structure indicated generally at H2, H4 is provided for supporting the legs of the patient,

this structure being pivotally connected with the seat unit 55 near the front thereof for relative movement about a transverse horizontal axis. Preferably the leg structure comprises two separate units H2 and II4 adapted respectively for supporting the right and left legs of the patient. when there are two units, they are pivotally movable about the same axis.

The right leg unit comprises spaced longitudinal members IIE and II8 and a front transverse member, not shown. Similarly, the left leg unit comprises spaced longitudinal members I and I22 and a transverse member I24, shown in Figs. 12 and 13. It will be observed that the main portions of the outer longitudinal members H8 and I28 of the leg units are respectively in longitudinal register with the side members 56, 55 of the seat unit.

The details of the pivotal connections between 6 the seat unit and the leg units may be widely varied, but as shown in Fig. 8 two tubes I23 and I28 are welded to the front member 58 of the seat unit. Connected respectively with the members H6 and IIS of the right leg unit are two tubes I30 and I32 which are at opposite ends of the tube I26 and in alignment therewith. Connected respectively with the members I20 and I22 of the left leg unit are two tubes I34 and I36 which are at opposite ends of the tube I28 and in alignment therewith. A pivot rod I38 extends through all of the tubes I26, I30, I32, I28, I34

and H6 and serves as a pivotal support for both leg units.

Also pivotally connected'with the front of the seat unit 55 is a supporting lever for the leg structure or units, this lever preferably being movable about the same axis about which the leg structure or units move. The said supporting lever has at least one longitudinal member I49 which extends forwardly and rearwardly from the pivotal axis to provide a forwardly extending arm and a rearwardly extending arm. Preferably there are two similar members I48 at opposite sides of the seat unit and of the leg structure. Portions of the forwardly extending arms extend under the leg structure to support it, and preferably the last said portions are in the form of a downwardly offset transverse member I42 which may be integral with the said arms as shown.

The pivot rod I38 is extended at its ends to pivotally support the lever members I50, I45. The rod I38 thus serves as a common pivot rod for the leg units and for the lever members. As shown in Fig. 9, a ball bearing I44 may be interposed between the rod I38 and each lever member I43. Nuts I46, I45 on the pivot rod hold the lever members I43, I49 in place. As shown, a washer I48 is provided for each nut, the washer engaging a shoulder on the rod. The washers and shoulders serve to maintain proper spacing so that the several parts may freely move on the rod I38.

A means is provided on the supporting frame l for engaging the rearwardly extending arm of eachmember I 40 to cause the forward arm there of to swing downwardly about its pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved downwardly and to swine upwardly about its said pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved upwardly. Preferably each rearwardly extending arm. is provided with a longitudinal slot I58 and the engaging means on the frame is a fixed pin I52 which extends through the slot. Each pin I52 is carried by a block IE at the juncture of the main frame members 52 and 54. As shown in Fig. 10, spacing washers Hit and 58 are provided at the side of the member I52), being held in place by a nut I655. The rear slotted portion of each member I46 may be covered by a guard I62, the guard having a slot i5 3 therein similar to the slot I58.

When the seat unit 55 is in its uppermost position as shown in Figs. 2 and 5, the pivoted supporting levers with their transverse member I42 in Figs. 2 and 5 to its lower position as shown in Figs. 1 and 6, the lever or levers for supporting the leg units are swung in the counterclockwise direction under the control of the pins I38 and I52, I52. The slots I50 in the rearwardly extending arms M!) are of sufficient length to permit the required movement of the lever members MEI with respect to the pins I52. As the supporting lever or levers are moved, the forward transverse member I42 moves downwardly and the leg units are permitted to correspondingly move downwardly by gravity. The relationship of the parts is such that the leg units move downwardly to the extent ordinarily required the leg units in accordance with the leg length of the patient.

Referring particularly to Figs. 12 and 13, each foot unit includes a frame casting I having a bar I72 which extends along the bottom of the outermost side member such as I of the corresponding leg unit. Two yokes I14 and I16 surround the member I20 and serve as guides for the bar I12 which is movable longitudinally therein. The front or lower yoke.l I6 has a screw H8 which is engageable with the serrated lower face of the bar H2 to hold it in adjusted position.

A foot rest I80 is transversely pivoted to the frame H0 at I 82. Pivoted to the foot rest at I84 is a sector I85 having teeth which are engage able with a pin I88 on the frame Il'll. handle I98 is provided on the. sector I86 for moving it to disengage it from the pin I88. Preferably a guide strip I92 is provided to limit pivotal movement of the sector. Each foot rest may be moved manually from the position shown in Fig. 13 to the position shown in Fig. 12 or to an intermediate position, the teeth of the sector moving by gravity into engagement with the pin I88. When the foot rest is to be reversely moved, the sector is relatively moved by the handle I90 to disengage the teeth from the pin.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that each foot unit may be adjusted longitudinally in accordance with the leg length of the patient, arid may also be moved pivotally to the straight position shown in Fig. 13, or to the perpendicular position shown in Fig. 12 or to an intermediate position.

It is sometimes necessary or desirable to move one or the other or even both of the leg units H2 and H4 to a horizontal position or to an intermediate position after the parts have been moved to the chair position as shown in Figs. 1 and 5. For this purpose each leg unit has secured to it a toothed sector I94 which is pivoted at I96 to the outermost side member, such as H6, of the corresponding leg unit. The sector has teeth which are engageable with the transverse member I52 of the leg unit supporting frame. A pin or handle I98 is provided on the sector to disengage it from the member I42. Preferably a guard strip 200 is provided to limit pivotal movement of the sector. Each leg rest may be moved manually from the position shown in Fig. 6 to the position shown in Fig. 7 or to an interme- A pin or diate position, the teeth of the sector moving by gravity into engagement with the member I 42. When the leg rest is to be reversely moved, the sector is relatively moved by the handle I98 to disengage the teeth from the member I42.

The seat unit also includes a cushion 2G2 formed of a suitable material such as foam rubber, this being supported on the plate 62 and located between the side, rear and front mem bers of the unit frame. A fabric cover may be provided for the cushion as shown. The back unit also comprises a fabric cover secured to the side and rear members of the said unit, The leg units and foot units also comprise suitable fabric covers.

When the seat is lowered, the frame members 30, 30 constitute arm rests. Preferably, as shown in Fig. 3, sheet metal guard plates 204 are secured to the inner sides of the members 36, 30 to close the spaces at the sides of the seat unit when the latter is in its lower position. As shown, each plate 204 has a flange 206 at the top of the corresponding member 30. Holes 208, 208 may be provided in each flange 296 and in the corresponding member 39 for receiving supporting lugs on a removable tray (not shown) The wheels 22, 22 may be provided with conventional rims 2H], 2H3 for manual engagement by the patient when the parts are in the chair relationship. By means of these rims the patient can move the chair in the usual manner. Preferably a hand operable brake 2I2 is also provided. This does not constitute a part of the present invention and it may be of any usual or preferred type.

The invention claimed is:

1. In a convertible hospital chair, the combination of a supporting frame, a seat un t mounted on the frame and guided for movement along substantially vertical lines to a lower position or to an upper position, a back unit horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the rear thereof, a leg structure horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the front thereof, the said back unit and leg structure'being located in horizontal positions when the seat is in its said upper position, means connected with the supporting frame and directly engaging the seat unit independently of the back unit and of the leg structure for relatively moving the seat unit downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for pivotally moving the back unit to an upwardly inclined position, which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper position also serves to cause the back unit to pivotally move back to its said horizontal position, and means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for causing the leg structure to pivotally move to a downwardly inclined position which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper position also serves to pivotally move the leg structure back to its said horizontal position.

2. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 1, wherein vertical rods are rigidly connected at their upper ends to the seat unit, and wherein vertical guides are provided on the supporting frame which respectively fit the said rods to guide the seat unit for vertical downward movement or vertical upward movement.

3. In a convertible hospital chair, the combination of a supporting frame, a seat unit mounted on the frame and guided for movement along substantially vertical lines to a lower position or to an upper position, a back unit. horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the rear thereof, a leg structure horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the front thereof, the said back unit and leg structure being located in horizontal positions when the seat unit is in its said upper position, means for moving the seat unit downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, which means includes a substantially vertical screw below the seat unit and connected therewith and also includes a nut having threaded engagement with the screw and held against vertical movement on the supporting frame, means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for pivotally moving the back unit to an upwardly inclined position which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper position also serves to cause the back unit to pivotally move back to its said horizontal position, and means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for causing the leg structure to pivotally move to a downwardly inclined position, which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper position also serves to pivotally move the leg structure back to its said horizontal position.

4. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 3, wherein the screw is nonrotatable and is rigidly connected at its upper end to the seat unit, wherein the nut is rotatable, and wherein means is provided for rotating the nut to move the screw and the seat unit downwardly or upwardly.

5. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 4, wherein a bevel gear is connected with the nut, wherein a bevel pinion on the frame meshes with the bevel gear, and wherein a manually operable crank is connected to the bevel pinion for rotating it.

6. In a convertible hospital chair, the combination of a supporting frame, a seat unit mounted on the frame and guided for movement to a lower position or to an upper position, a back unit horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the rear thereof, a leg structure horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the front thereof, the said back unit and leg structure being located in horizontal positions when the seat unit is in its said upper position, means connected with the supporting frame and directly engaging the seat unit for relatively moving the seat un t downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for causing the leg structure to pivotally move to a downwardly inclined position, which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper posi tion also serves to pivotally move the leg structure back to its said horizontal position, and a stationary support for the back unit in engagement therewith at the bottom thereof and at the rear of its pivotal connection with the seat unit, the said support being mounted on the frame and positioned to cause the said back unit to relatively move pivotally in the upward direction when the seat unit is moved downwardly to its lower position and the said support permitting the said back unit to relatively move pivotally in the downward direction back to its horizontal position when the seat unit is moved upwardly back to its upper position.

-7. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 6, wherein the stationary support is a generally horizontal longitudinal track, and wherein the back unit includes at least one roller engageable with and movable along the track.

8. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 7, wherein the track has a depression therein near the front thereof for receiving the roller when the seat unit is in its lower position and when the back unit has been moved pivotally to the maximum extent.

9. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 6, wherein there is a second stationary support on the frame at the rear of the first said support and positioned to engage the back unit when it is in its horizontal position.

10. In a convertible hospital chair, the combination of a supporting frame, a seat unit mounted on the frame and guided for movement to a lower position or to an upper position, a

back unit horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the rear thereof, a leg structure horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the front thereof, the said 'back unit and leg structure being located in horizontal positions when the seat unit is in its said upper position, means connected with the supporting frame and directly engaging the seat unit for relatively moving the seat unit downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for pivotally moving the back unit to an upwardly inclined position, which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper position also serves to cause the back unit to pivotally move back to its said horizontal position, .a lever pivoted to the seat unit for movement about a transverse axis near the front thereof, which lever has a rearwardly extending arm and also has a forwardly extending arm with a portion thereof extending under the leg structure to support it, and means on the supporting frame for engaging the rearwardly extending arm of the lever to cause the forwardly extending arm thereof to swing downwardly about its pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved downwardly and to swing upwardly about its said pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved upwardly, the said forwardly extending arm of the lever causing the leg structure to move pivotally downwardly from its horizontal position as the seat unit is moved downwardly to its lower position and to move pivotally upwardly back to its horizontal position as the seat unit is moved up similar rearwardly extending arms at opposite sides of the seat unit and of the leg structure, wherein a transverse member is provided which is connected with the two forwardly extending arms and which is positioned under the leg structure to support it, and wherein there are two similar means on the supporting frame for respectively engaging the two rearwardly extending arms.

12. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 10, wherein the rearwardly extending arm of the lever has a longitudinal slot therein, and wherein the means on the supporting frame for engaging the rearwardly extending arm is a pin which enters the said slot.

13. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 10, wherein a common pivot rod is provided for the leg structure and for the lever which supports the leg structure.

14. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 13, wherein a transverse tubular member is provided on the seat unit at the front thereof, wherein the leg structure comprises at least two transverse tubular members in alignment with the first said tubular member, and wherein the common pivot rod extends through the said tubular members and through an aperture in the lever.

15. A convertible hospital chair as set forth in claim 14, wherein there are two transversely spaced aligned tubular members on the seat unit, and wherein the leg structure comprises two similar transversely spaced leg units, each having two transversely spaced tubular members which align with each other and with the tubular members on the seat unit, the two tubular members of each leg unit being at opposite ends of the corresponding tubular members on the seat unit.

16. In a convertible hospital chair, the com bination of a supporting frame, a seat unit mounted on the frame and guided for movement to a lower position or to an upper position, a back unit horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the rear thereof, a leg structure horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the front thereof, the said back unit and leg structure being located in horizontal positions when the seat unit is in its said upper position, means connected with the supporting frame and directly engaging the seat unit for relatively moving the seat unit downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, a stationary support for the back unit in engagement therewith at the bottom thereof and at the rear of its pivotal connection with the seat unit, the said support being mounted on the frame and positioned to cause the said back unit to relatively move pivotally in the upward direction when the seat unit is moved. downwardly to its lower position and the said support permitting the said back unit to rela tively move pivotally in the downward direction back to its horizontal position when the seat unit is moved upwardly back to its upper position, a lever pivoted to the seat unit for movement about a transverse axis near the front thereof, which lever has a rearwardly extending arm and also has a forwardly extending arm with a portion thereof extending under the leg structure to support it, and means on the supporting frame for engaging the rearwardly extending arm of the lever to cause the forwardly extending arm thereof to swing downwardly about its pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved downwardly and to swing upwardly about its said pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved upwardly, the said forwardly extending arm of the lever causing the leg structure to move pivotally downwardly from its horizontal position as the seat unit is moved downwardly to its lower position and to move pivotally upwardly back to its horizontal position as the seat unit is moved upwardly back to its upper position.

17. In a convertible hospital chair, the combination of a supporting frame, a seat unit mounted on the frame and guided for movement to a lower position or to an upper position, a back unit horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the rear thereof, two similar transversely spaced leg units horizontally and transversely pivoted to the seat unit near the front thereof for movement about a common axis, the said back and leg units being located in horizontal positions when the seat unit is in its said upper position, means connected with the supporting frame and directly engaging the 7 seat unit for relatively moving the seat unit downwardly to its lower position or upwardly to its upper position, means dependent upon downward movement of the seat unit to its said lower position for pivotally moving the back structure to an upwardly inclined position, which means upon upward movement of the seat unit back to its said upper position also serves to cause the back structure to pivotally move back to its said horizontal position, transversely spaced levers pivoted to the seat unit for movement about a horizontal transverse axis near the front thereof, which levers have rearwardly extending arms and also have forwardly extending arms, a transverse member carried by the forwardly extending arms extending under the two leg units to support them, means on the supporting frame for engaging the rearwardly extending arms of the levers to cause the forwardly extending arms and the transverse member to swing downwardly about their pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved downwardly and to swing upwardly about their said pivotal axis as the seat unit is moved upwardly, the said transverse member permitting the two leg units to move pivotally downwardly from their horizontal positions as the seat unit is moved downwardly to its lower'position and the said transverse member moving the two leg units pivotally upwardly back to their horizontal positions as the seat unit is moved upwardly back to its upper position, and two means connected respectively with the two leg units and engageable with the transverse member, each of which means serves to releasably hold the corresponding unit in a relatively elevated position to which it may be moved manually.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,375,151 Troxell May 1, 1945 2,609,862 Pratt Sept. 9, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 3,249 Great Britain Mar. 8, 1886

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2375151 *Sep 28, 1943May 1, 1945Troxell Edward LConvertible chair
US2609862 *Aug 21, 1946Sep 9, 1952Marion Chair Company IncHospital chair
GB188603249A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2847058 *Sep 10, 1953Aug 12, 1958Anthony G AllisonFolding wheel chair
US2849051 *Dec 5, 1956Aug 26, 1958Ill George W StreeterConvertible wheeled chair
US2935123 *Oct 13, 1958May 3, 1960Lloyd-Young Carysfort FLeg rests
US3038174 *Jun 23, 1960Jun 12, 1962Brown DonovanParaplegic hospital chair
US3050741 *Apr 11, 1960Aug 28, 1962Charles S ColemanBed table and commode
US5050899 *Jul 6, 1990Sep 24, 1991Stensby Harold FMedical crash-chair and treatment table
US5179745 *Apr 8, 1991Jan 19, 1993Hebert Neil HElevating convertible wheelchair
US5333887 *Nov 16, 1993Aug 2, 1994Joe SharpWheelchair/gurney
US5402544 *Sep 17, 1993Apr 4, 1995Easy Lift Care Products, Inc.Mobile transport device
US5584082 *May 12, 1994Dec 17, 1996Easy Lift Care Products, Inc.Convertible gurney
US6428103 *Aug 31, 2000Aug 6, 2002Chin-Lien HongWheelchair with a pivoting back, seat and leg supports
US6742206 *Apr 3, 2003Jun 1, 2004Tai-Kang HanNurse robot
US7124456Aug 11, 2004Oct 24, 2006Stryker CorporationArticulated support surface for a stretcher or gurney
US7131154Feb 23, 2006Nov 7, 2006Wood Lark Circle, Inc.Mobile transport device
US7306251 *Feb 18, 2005Dec 11, 2007Jlg, LlcReclining wheelchair
US7325265 *Jul 29, 2005Feb 5, 2008Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Advanced articulation system and mattress support for a bed
US7395564Mar 24, 2006Jul 8, 2008Stryker CorporationArticulated support surface for a stretcher or gurney
US7412735Aug 24, 2005Aug 19, 2008Stryker CorporationPatient support apparatus
US7600817Aug 16, 2005Oct 13, 2009Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Chair
US8328283Oct 7, 2009Dec 11, 2012Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Chair
US8414074Nov 1, 2011Apr 9, 2013Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Chair
US8419124Mar 14, 2011Apr 16, 2013Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Chair with movable arms and tables sections
US8495774 *Sep 11, 2009Jul 30, 2013Piedmont 361, LlcHospital chair beds with articulating foot sections
US8662595Dec 7, 2012Mar 4, 2014Hill-Rom Services, IncChair having powered leg extension
US20100064439 *Sep 11, 2009Mar 18, 2010Sohrab SoltaniHospital chair beds with articulating foot sections
US20130291305 *Jul 2, 2013Nov 7, 2013Piedmont 361, LlcMethods of translating hospital chair beds with articulating foot sections
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/87, 5/619, 5/81.10R, 5/86.1, 297/340
International ClassificationA61G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G5/1059, A61G5/006
European ClassificationA61G5/00C, A61G5/10S2