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Publication numberUS2684418 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1954
Filing dateJan 5, 1951
Priority dateJan 5, 1951
Publication numberUS 2684418 A, US 2684418A, US-A-2684418, US2684418 A, US2684418A
InventorsRichard Koch Alfred
Original AssigneeHoneywell Regulator Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Actuating mechanism
US 2684418 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 20, 1954 KOCH 2,684,418

ACTUATING MECHANISM Filed Jan. 5, 1951 IN V EN TOR.

Patented July 20, 1954 ACTUATING MECHANISM' Alfred Richard Koch, Freeport, Ill., assignor to Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company, Minneapolis, Minn, a corporation of Delaware Application J anuary 5, 1951, Serial No. 204,610

9 Claims. (01. 200153) This invention relates to an actuating mechanism for controlling a movable member.

An object of thisinvention is to provide a novel combination of an actuator and a movable member actuated by it.

Another object of this invention is to provide a reciprocable actuator in combination with a pivoted member positioned to be engaged by the actuator, wherein the actuator is positively aligned in a novel manner with the pivotal axis of the pivoted member.

A further object of this invention is to resiliently support the actuator in a novel manner for insuring its coaction with the actuated mechanism.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from a consideration of the following description, in which the invention is first described in connection with its use in a snap acting electrical switch.

In the drawing Figure 1 is a perspective view of a switch embodying the present invention;

Fig, 2' is a longitudinal elevational view of a partially cut away switch as shown in Figure 1 and showing one form of the switch actuating mechanism according to the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of the switch taken along the line 3-3 in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line L in Fig. 2

Fig. 5 is a partially exploded perspective View of a portion of the switch;

Fig. 6 is a top plan view of a modified actuating mechanism according to the present invent-ion;

Fig. '7 is a partial cut-away longitudinal section of the modification of Fig. 6, and

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the actuator shown in Figs. 6 and 7. a

The switch which incorporates the present invention is enclosed in a housing comprising a channel-like base I, as best seen from Fig. 5, and a rectangular shell 2 through which protrudes the operating button 3. Ears 4 extending outwardly from the shell 2 provide means for mounting the switch.

The snap spring employed in the switch, and generally indicated at 5, comprises elongated tension members 6 and a compression member 1 integral at an end 8 free to move, and a mounted end S joining the other ends of the tension member 6. The spring 5 is cantilevered at end 9 on an anchor iii in such a manner that a straight edge H of the end 9 overhangs the anchor to act as a pivot. The anchor It is slidably assembled in grooves l2 in base i and held therein by an end wall of shell 2. A terminal I3 integral with anchor iii passes through the base I at one of the grooves I2 to provide a connec tion for the switch into a circuit. A toggle, generally indicated at M, is pivoted on the straight edge H and supports the compression member 1 in bowed compression to form with tension members 6 a snap spring mechanism. The top of the toggle i l has a ridge 15 parallel to the pivot ii separating two valleys l6 and I1. Projections i8 and i9 on the alternator I i engageable with opposite sides of the anchor Iii act as stops on the rotation of the alternator. A lower stop as, retained in a groove M in base I by the shell 2, limits the downward motion of free end 3 of the snap spring 5. The upper stop is provided by stationary contact 22 mounted on a bracket 23 integral with terminal 24. The combination bracket and terminal 23 and 24 is retained in a slot 25 in base i by the shell :2 in such a manner that the bracket 23 is inside the housing while the terminal 24 is outside the housing. A movable contact 26 is mounted on the free end 3 in a position to be engageable with stationary contact 22.

The actuating mechanism according to this embodiment of the invention includes a leafspring construction, generally indicated at 21 and having transverse cross pieces 21a, 27b interconnecting the ends of the longitudinal leaf spring members, and formed with transverse ears 2&- at each corner to support the spring on shoulders 29 near the upper edges Bil of base I, while permitting the spring to bow longitudinally. An aperture 3| is formed between transverse bridging m mbers 3 la, 3th interconnecting the longitudinal, spaced leaf spring members intermediate the ends thereof to permit the passage of end portion of actuator 33. Other aper tures 34 permit nexure of the spring 2'! to be spread over a greater portion of the spring. A pair of J-shaped arms 35 connected at their short ends to actuator 33' are bent perpendicular to the plane of actuator 33 to form protrusions 36 and 31 to support the actuator on spring 27. The end portion 32 may be tapered or rounded at edge tit-to reduce friction as it slides on toggle It, as described later. The stem 39, connected to end portion 32 intermediate arms 35 is surmounted by a cross piece til. This cross piece 4c pivots in a groove ii in the operator button 3. The arms 35 cause the actuator to be supported perpendicularly on spring 3?, while groove 4! in the operator button locates the actuator longitudinally on the spring in a position aligned with the pivot of toggle ii. A flange 42, formed on the operator 3, engages shell 2 to limit upward movement or" the operator. Downward movement of operator 3 is limited by abutments l3 engageable with upper edge 39. of base i. These abutments t3. are tapered to limit move-- ment of the groove ii to the same distance regardless of which portion of the button 3 may be pushed by an operator.

It will be seen that leaf spring Z'l resiliently supports actuator 33 by its engagement with protrusions 38, 3'1 and urges one end thereof into engagement with groove 45 in operator 3, and thereby biases the operator 3 and actuator 33 towards a limiting position away from toggle M. The groove ti not only is the pivot for the actuator 33, but positions it such that the actuator edge 38 remote from the operator is normally held substantially on a line between groove 3! and pivot ll of the toggle. The projections i8 and I9 on the toggle are so spaced that with projection l3 engaging the anchor it, the ridge i5 is to one side of the line of action of actuator 33, while with projection i9 engaging the anchor Iii, the ridge i5 is to the opposite side of the line of action of actuator 33. Thus, the toggle alternately presents one or the other of the inclined surfaces adjacent ridge iii to be interposed in the path of actuator 33 upon successive reciprocations of the actuator. Although the ridge l5 moves from one side to the other of the actuator 33, the valleys i6 and ii are so positioned as to never cross or approach closely the line of action of the actuator 33, so that in either position of the actuator it will present a surface which extends in a direction inclined to, or offset from, the direction of reciprocation of the actuator. The compression member l is so supported on the toggle i i that, as the toggle rotates on pivot H from one limiting position to another as defined by projections 58 and [9, the compression member 'l is moved through a line of maximum stress, causing the free end 8 to snap between stops 2% and 22.

When the user presses button 3 at any point on its surface, the groove ii moves downward, pressing actuator 33 against the bias of return spring 2? into engagement with toggle i i. Assuming toggle M to be in the position shown in Fig. 2, the tapered edge 36 of actuator 33 will engage the inclined face between ridge i5 and valley H and will be deflected, sliding into the valley ii to apply a torque rotating toggle i l from the limiting position defined by projection 59 to that defined by projection it. By so rotating the toggle, the compression member I is moved through a position of unstable equilibrium to snap the movable contact 26 out of engagement with stationary contact 22. When the button 3 is released, the return spring 2? moves the actuator 33 and button 3 back to their normal positions while the toggle M and snap spring 5 remain in their new positions.

The next time the button 3 is pressed to operate the switch, the rounded edge 38 on the actuator will engage the inclined face of the toggle between ridge i5 and valley it and will be defiected into the valley it to apply a torque rotating toggle Hi back to the limiting position defined by projection 59. This rotation of the toggle moves the compression member 1 through a posi tion of unstable equilibrium to snap the movable contact 28 into engagement with stationary contact 22. When the button 3 is released, the return spring again moves the actuator 33 and button 3 back to their normal positions while the toggle i i and snap spring 5 remain in the positions to which they have just been moved, so that the parts are all once again in the position shown in Fig. 2.

In the modification shown in Figs. 6, '7 and 8, the toggle is shown as the ultimate load on the actuator, such as would be the case if an indicating pointer or the like were moved in response to movement of the toggle. The return spring for the actuator takes the form of a leaf spring 44 loosely supported at each end on recesses 45 in base 48. The toggle 47 is pivoted at 48 about a fixed point aligned with the path of reciprocation of the actuator. The top surface of toggle 47 is provided with a ridge 49 between valleys 5i] and 5|. The actuator 52 comprises a main portion 53 having an aperture 54 for reception of leaf spring 34, and transverse arms 55 and 55 extending on opposite sides thereof, the latter being formed by bending a T-shaped portion perpendicular to the main portion 53. These transverse arms bear against leaf spring M to support the actuator 52 between spring 44 and the operator. The upper edge 5'! of actuator 52 pivots in groove 58 in operator 59. The lower edge 66 is engageable with toggle 41. The cooperation in this embodiment among the operator, actuator, toggle and return spring is the same as that previously described in connection with the first embodiment.

While there have been described herein two preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that numerous modifications and changes could be resorted to without departing from the spirit of my invention. For example, the return spring may take the form of a cantilevered leaf spring, or elastic bands extending transversely of the actuator. Likewise, as indicated above, the mechanism operated by the actuator need not be a snap acting switch, but rather the toggle may be the ultimate load or merely an operator for another mechanism.

I claim:

1. In combination, a reciprocable operator formed with a groove at its inner side, a pivoted toggle positioned at the inner side of the operator in spaced relation therefrom, the pivotal axis of said toggle being aligned with the path of reciprocation of the operator groove, and an actuator positioned at the inner side of the operator, said actuator being resiliently supported intermediate its extent and being formed with an outer edge portion pivotally seated in the operator groove to position the actuator to be moved by the operator toward the pivotal axis of the toggle.

2. In a switch mechanism, a movable operator, a resilient, flexible mounting member 1 iounted on the switch body to extend transversely of the direction of movement of the operator, an actuator extending in alignment with the direction of movement of the operator and pivotally engaging said operator, said actuator being formed intermediate its extent with a transverse protrusion for engagement with the resilient, flexible mounting member to be resiliently supported between said mounting member and the operator for movement in the direction of movement of the operator, said actuator terminating at its other end in spaced relation from the operator and from the resilient mounting member.

3. In combination, a reciprocable operator formed with a groove at its inner side, resilient mounting means at the inner side of the operator in spaced relation therefrom extending transversely of the direction of reciprocation thereof, a pivoted toggle positioned in spaced relation from the resilient mounting means at the side thereof remote from the operator, the pivotal axis of said toggle being aligned with the path of reciprocation of the operator groove, and an actuator extending on both sides of the resilient mounting means and having one end. for engaging the toggle, said actuator being formed intermediate its ends with transverse protrusions engaging the resilient mounting means to support the actuator perpendicularly with respect to the resilient mounting means, said actuator being formed at its other end with an edge pivoted in the operator groove for positioning said actuator to move in alignment with the pivotal axis of the toggle.

i. In combination, a reciproeable operator formed with a groove at its inner side, an elongated flat leaf spring structure at the inner side of the operator supported at opposite ends to extend transversely of the direction of reciprocation thereof, and a reciprocable actuator extending on both sides of the leaf spring structure, said actuator being formed intermediate its ends with transverse protrusions engaging the leaf spring structure at the side thereof adjacent the operator, said actuator also being formed at one end with an edge pivoted in the operator groove, whereby said actuator is resiliently supported between the operator and the leaf spring structure to extend perpendicularly of the leaf spring structure.

5. In a switch mechanism, a movable plunger, a mounting member in spaced relation from the plunger and extending transversely of the direction of movement thereof, said mounting member being formed with a pair of spaced, flexible, resilient leaf springs, transverse portions formed on said leaf springs adjacent the ends thereof for mounting the same on the switch body, a pair of spaced bridging portions interconnecting said leaf springs adjacent the middle thereof to define a generally rectangular central aperture extending through the mounting member, an actuator extending in alignment with the direction of movement of the plunger and being formed at one extremity with an edge for pivotally engaging the plunger, said actuator being formed intermediate its extent with a pair of spaced transverse protrusions, each said protrusion engaging a respective leaf spring at the middle thereof, whereby said actuator is resiliently supported to extend perpendicularly of the mounting member between the mounting member and the plunger, said actuator extending through said central aperture in the mounting member and formed at its extremity remote from the plunger with an edge for actuating a switch operator.

6. In a switch mechanism, a movable operator, a mounting member disposed in spaced relation from the operator, said mounting member being formed with flexible, resilient leaf spring portions extending transversely of the direction of movement of said operator, said mounting member also being formed with spaced bridging portions interconnecting the leaf spring portions intermediate the lengths thereof to form an aperture therebetween extending through the mounting member, and an actuator extending in align ment with the direction of movement of the operator and at one end pivotally engaging the operator, said actuator being formed intermediate its extent with a pair of spaced transverse protrusions, each said protrusion engaging a respective leaf spring at the middle thereof, whereby said actuator is resiliently supported to extend perpendicularly of the mounting member between the mounting member and the operator.

7. In combination, a switch housing having spaced walls, an operator reciprocable on said switch housing and formed with a groove at its inner side, an elongated fiat leaf spring structure at the inner side of the operator in spaced relation therefrom, said leaf spring structure being supported at its opposite ends on said spaced walls of the switch housing and extending transversely of the direction of reciprocation of said operator, a pivoted toggle positioned in spaced relation from the leaf spring structure at the side thereof remote from the operator, the pivotal axis of said toggle being aligned with the path of reciprocation of the operator groove, and an actuator extending on both sides of the leaf spring structure and formed with an edge for engaging the toggle, said actuator being formed intermediate its ends with transverse protrusions bearing against the leaf spring structure at the side thereof adjacent the operator and being formed at one end with an edge pivoted in the operator groove, for resiliently supporting the actuator between the leaf spring structure and the operator to extend perpendicularly of the leaf spring structure and for positioning said actuator to be moved by the operator toward the pivotal axis of the toggle.

8. In combination, a reciproeable operator formed with a groove at its inner side, an elongated resilient fiat leaf spring at the inner side of the operator in spaced relation therefrom supported at opposite ends and extending transverse- 13 of the direction of reciprocation thereof, and an actuator extending on both sides of the leaf spring, said actuator being formed intermediate its ends with an aperture through which the leaf spring passes, said actuator being formed adjacent said aperture with transverse protrusions bearing against the leaf spring at the side thereof adjacent the operator, said actuator also being formed at one end with an edge pivotally seated in the groove at the inner side of the operator, whereby said actuator is resiliently supported between the operator and the leaf spring to extend perpendicularly of the leaf spring.

9. In a switch mechanism, a switch housing having spaced end walls, an operator reciprocable on said switch housing, a flexible, resilient elongated leaf spring supported at its opposite ends on said end walls of the switch housing and extending transversely of the direction of movement of said operator in spaced relation therefrom, an actuator extending in the direction of movement of the operator and at one of its extremities pivotally engaging the operator, said actuator also being formed intermediate its extent with an aperture through which the leaf spring passes, said actuator being formed adjacent said aperture with protruding portions extending transversely thereof and bearing against the leaf spring for supporting the actuator to extend perpendicularly of the leaf spring between the operator and the leaf spring.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,051,219 Grabau Jan. 21, 1913 2,080,586 Varley May 18, 1937 2,499,958 Knowlton Mar. 7, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1051219 *Feb 23, 1911Jan 21, 1913Hans E GrabauPush-button electric switch.
US2080586 *Sep 26, 1935May 18, 1937Inter Outer Telephone CorpInter-outer telephone system and equipment
US2499958 *Dec 18, 1947Mar 7, 1950Sylvania Electric ProdInterlock switch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2785255 *Jun 25, 1954Mar 12, 1957Gen Motors CorpElectric switches
US2890387 *Jan 18, 1955Jun 9, 1959Sylvania Electric ProdAutomobile headlight control system
US2933578 *Jan 3, 1957Apr 19, 1960Hubbell Inc HarveySingle push button switch
US2965737 *Jul 22, 1957Dec 20, 1960Rodale Mfg Co IncElectrical switching device
US2991344 *Oct 31, 1958Jul 4, 1961Gen ElectricPush button a. c. switch
US3213229 *Jun 17, 1963Oct 19, 1965Hubbell Inc HarveyPlunger operated alternate action electrical snap switch
US3321983 *Jan 4, 1965May 30, 1967Master Specialties CompanyTilting bar alternate action switch mechanism
US5032698 *Nov 7, 1990Jul 16, 1991Alps Electric Co., Ltd.Switch device with transversely flexible means for coupling driving bar and handling knob
USRE32419 *Jan 27, 1986May 12, 1987Engineering Research Applications, Inc.Molded keyboard and method of fabricating same
DE1085217B *Mar 31, 1958Jul 14, 1960Licentia GmbhSchalter mit Kontaktdruckerhoehung durch Ausnutzung der Kontaktfederreaktionskraft
DE1098073B *Nov 29, 1958Jan 26, 1961Vedder Gmbh GebElektrischer Tastschalter mit zwei stabilen Schaltstellungen
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/525, 200/454, 200/345, 74/100.2
International ClassificationH01H13/60, H01H13/50, H01H13/26, H01H13/42
Cooperative ClassificationH01H13/60, H01H13/42
European ClassificationH01H13/60, H01H13/42