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Publication numberUS2684487 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 27, 1954
Filing dateAug 20, 1951
Priority dateAug 20, 1951
Publication numberUS 2684487 A, US 2684487A, US-A-2684487, US2684487 A, US2684487A
InventorsSteven L Hansen, Orlan K Hedrick
Original AssigneeSteven L Hansen, Orlan K Hedrick
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protectively covered artificial leg and skin-like covering therefor
US 2684487 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

: Y 1954 s. L. HANSEN ET AL 7 i PRQTECTIVELY COVERED ARTIFICIAL LEG AND SKIN-LIKE COVERING THEREFOR Filed Aug. 20, 1951 lhwentor:

STEVEN L. HANSEN,

' RLAN K. HEDRICK,

%4 attorneys,

Patented July 27, l954 UNITED STATS ATENT fiFFlCE PROTECTIVELY COVERED ARTIFICIAL LEG AND SKIN-LIKE COVERING THEREFOR Steven L. Hansen and Orlan K. Hedrick, Salt Lake City, Utah 6 Claims.

This invention relates to the art of prosthesis, particularly in connection with artificial legs.

Artificial legs as ordinarily constructed are devoid of superficial covering. The ankle joint and the knee joint, if the latter be present, are customarily left open and unprotected, except for the usual hosiery worn with the leg. As a re-- suit, the hosiery is subjected to seriously destructive chafing at the joint or joints, and dust and dirt tend to filter into the latter. has been heretofore proposed to take care of these difiiculties is an elastic band broad enough to comprehend a joint, and anchored. to the leg above and below the joint. This has never proven satisfactory in practice.

In accordance with the present invention, we provide an elastic, skin-like covering over substantially the entire artificial leg, such covering being in the form of a snugly fitting stocking otherwise unattached to the leg. This gives sufficient freedom of action at the joints to largely overcome any tendency toward constantly repeatedly localized stretch and return of the covering material during use of the leg.

A feature of preferred embodiments of our invention resides in making portions of the skin covering at the joints thicker and therefore less resilient than other portions, to still further overcome the tendency toward concentration or localization of the effect of activity of the joint by directing the Stretching action into the body of the covering in general.

In the most preferred form of the invention, the thickened and less resilient portion of the ankle joint is a broad band provided with a depending appendage in the nature of a saddle covering the sole of the foot for anchoring the ankle hand against response to joint movement.

We have found that this unattached skin-like covering tones up the action of the limb, because of its extensive and comprehensive elasticity.

Important subsidiary features of our invention reside in the tapering of the upper margin of the covering inwardly to lesser diameter than called for by the particular leg concerned, for effecting resilient anchorage to the leg, and in the provision of a rough exterior surface for the covering, serving to frictionally anchor the customary dress hosiery in place when applied over the protectively covered leg. In this connection, we prefer to make the interior surface of the covering smooth and substantiallynon-adherent, to facilitate initial positioning upon the leg and to enhance the aforementioned dissipation of essen- The most that l faction than has been possible heretofore.

2 tially local activity into the body of the covering generally.

We have found that users of our improved artificial legs experience considerably greater satis- Notonly are previous difficulties overcome, as mentioned above, and the wearing of usual types of hosiery facilitated, along with improved limb action, but the entire leg is given a more natural appearance when the covering is made in skin colors.

Since the skin covering may be fabricated and sold independently of an artificial leg, for subse quent application to the leg by a user, our invention is directed to the artificial skin covering per se, as an article of manufacture, as well as to the combination.

Additional objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the particular preferred embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 represents a side elevation of an artificial leg equipped with an artificial skin covering in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2, a similar View showing the skin covering in vertical section.

Fig. 3, a perspective view of the skin-like covering per se prior to the application of the artificial leg; and

Fig. 4, a View corresponding to that of Fig. 2,

but showing the skin-like covering comprehending the knee joint.

Referring to the drawing: the artificial leg proper of Figs. 1 and 2, is indicated l8, and may be of any usual construction. It possesses an ankle joint H, which articulates during use of the limb, and ordinarily is the cause of rapid wear and deterioration of dress hosiery customarily worn over the leg. Furthermore, articulation of the joint ordinarily facilitates entry of dust and dirt to the working parts, resulting in rapid wear thereof.

In accordance with our invention, the artificial leg I0 is completely encased by a protective, artificial skin-like covering l2, having the general formation of a stocking, and being applied without actual fastening to the limb.

The artificial skin-like covering !2 is usually formed independently of the artificial leg, from rubber latex or similar material, and is applied to the leg thereafter in the manner of a stocking. As applied, it hugs the leg, but permits freedom of action of the joint, substantially Without localized stretch at and surrounding the joint.

The most practical way of making the covering i2 is by repeatedly brushing or sprayi rubber latex solution on a suitable form having the shape of the particular artificial leg concerned, or by repeatedly dipping the form into a body of rubber latex solution.

Prior to the application of the rubber latex solution, a band it of rubber or similar substance having a thickness greater than the thickness of the latex skin, is applied to the form at and around the location of the ankle joint. the embodiment illustrated, such band 53 advantageously has a dependent appendage iSa de signed as a saddle to cover the sole of the foot portion of the particular leg concerned, thereby anchoring the ankle band 53 against activity of the ankle joint i i. It should be noted that both the band [3 and saddle appendage l la serve, additionally, as cushions for ankle and foot activity.

AS so applied to the form prior to the application of the rubber latex solution, such ankle band l3 and anchoring appendage lSa are covered and thoroughly tied into the resulting article by the coagulated latex, which tends to fill out and round the surface irregularities. A smooth interior surface is thereby provided for the resulting article, and at least an approximation to an even contour for the outside surface. Where considered necessary or advisable, additional latex solution may be applied by brushing or spraying particular localized areas, even though a clipping procedure has been followed in general.

For the purpose of providing the desired rough exterior surface, indicated at is in Figs. 1 and it is preferred that the final coat of latex solution be roughened by brushing those instances where the previous coats were applied by spraying or dipping, though, of course, other roughening procedures may be employed, as, for example, the roughness may be actually molded in, regularly or irregularly by the application of suitable mold forms to the surface while yet plastic.

The form to which the latex solution is applied advantageously has its upper end tapered inwardly, so as to produce in the article as such, an inwardly tapered upper margin, as at 55, Fig. 3, having a diameter eifectively less than the diameter, in that vicinity, of the particular artificial leg concerned. This constricted upper margin, then, serves to positively anchor the covering in position on the artificial leg.

Instead of utilizing a preformed band i3 and appendage 155a, the same may be provided by first brushing or otherwise applying rubber latex solution to only those particular localized areas of the form concerned, the application being repeated until a proper thickness for the parts is built up directly on the form.

Regardless of how provided, however, the wall thickness for these critical parts of the skin coveling is sufficiently greater than the wall thickness of the remainder of the covering to effect the primary purpose thereof, as set forth herebefore, as well as to withstand any chafing action of the joint. Normally, the thickness of these parts will be more than twice the thickness of the remainder of the covering. Generally speaking, it is advantageous, both from the standing of function and appearance, to keep the wall thickness of major areas of the covering substantially uniform.

In those instances where the artificial leg comprehends both ankle and knee joints, as in Fig. 4:, where the knee joint is indicated is, an additional band ll is provided at and around such knee joint, such band being incorporated in the skin covering as a whole in the same manner as the ankle band l3.

Whereas this invention is here illustrated and described with respect to certain preferred specific forms thereof, it should be understood that various changes may be made without departing from the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. An artificial leg, comprising a leg proper having at least one articulative joint, and an elastic, skin-like covering in the form of a stocking molded to shape from a rubber material, said covering closely hugging the leg proper without attachment thereto, and portions of said rubber material at and in the vicinity of said joint being effectively thicker than the remainder to direct localized activity of the joint into the body of the covering.

2. An artificial leg, comprising a leg proper having an articulative ankle joint; and an elastic skin-like covering in the form of a stocking molded to to shape from a rubber material, said covering closely hugging the leg proper without attachment thereto, and including a broad band portion of rubber material at and surrounding said ankle joint as well as a saddle appendage depending from said band and passing through the sole of t e covering, said band and its saddle appendage having a thickness greater than the remainder of the covering to direct localized activity of said ankle joint into the body of the covering.

3. The combination recited in claim 2, wherein the skin-like covering has its top margin stretched tightly about the leg proper, as an elastic anchor.

4. The combination recited in claim 2, wherein the exterior surface of the skin-like covering is rough textured.

5. A skin-like covering for artificial legs, comprising an elastic stocking molded to shape from a rubber material and having a configuration substantially matching that of the artificial leg to which it is to be applied, said covering having portions at and in the vicinity of a joint effectively thicker than the remainder.

6. A skin-like covering for artificial legs, comprising an elastic stocking molded to shape from a rubber material and having a configuration substantially matching that of the artificial leg to which it is to be applied, the sole of said stocking having a thickness exceeding the general Wall thickness of said stocking, to provide for cushioning action.

References Cited in the file of this patent

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1859915 *Mar 14, 1929May 24, 1932William R DowmanStocking protector and method of making the same
US2578854 *Oct 8, 1948Dec 18, 1951Stewart John H FArtificial limb construction
GB240585A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5032135 *Jul 25, 1990Jul 16, 1991Jacobson Arthur CBoot for peg leg
US5133777 *Apr 20, 1990Jul 28, 1992Ohio Willow Wood CompanyAdjustable lower limb prosthesis and apparatus and method for the adjustment thereof
US5201775 *Feb 3, 1992Apr 13, 1993Ohio Willow Wood CompanyAdjustable lower limb prosthesis
US6083265 *Mar 11, 1998Jul 4, 2000Chas. A. Blatchford & Sons LimitedFoot and shin component for a lower limb prosthesis
US6153139 *Sep 14, 1998Nov 28, 2000Marquette; StuartProsthesis covering apparatus
US7799366Apr 12, 2006Sep 21, 2010Rehabilitation Institute Of ChicagoMethod for creating covers for prosthetic devices and other dynamic supporting members
US9351853Dec 1, 2014May 31, 2016The Ohio Willow Wood CompanyProsthetic foot
US20060229755 *Apr 12, 2006Oct 12, 2006Rehabilitation Institute Of ChicagoMethod for creating covers for prosthetic devices and other dynamic supporting members
US20110162477 *Jan 6, 2011Jul 7, 2011Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Robot
US20150081038 *Sep 18, 2013Mar 19, 2015Aqualeg SASFemoral prosthesis usable in water environment and method for manufacturing such prosthesis
DE29706610U1 *Apr 12, 1997Jun 5, 1997Hartmann AndreasNaturgetreu aussehendes, künstliches Körperteil
WO1999026563A1 *Nov 18, 1998Jun 3, 1999Chas A. Blatchford & Sons LimitedA foot and shin component for a lower limb prosthesis
WO2013115830A1 *Feb 4, 2012Aug 8, 2013Nordman Elwin Isaac JrProsthetic foot covering enabling rapid conversion between shoe and barefoot walking
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/27
International ClassificationA61F2/00, A61F2/60, A61F2/66, A61F2/50
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/60, A61F2002/5053, A61F2002/607, A61F2002/6614, A61F2002/5001
European ClassificationA61F2/60