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Publication numberUS2685363 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1954
Filing dateJul 24, 1950
Priority dateJul 24, 1950
Publication numberUS 2685363 A, US 2685363A, US-A-2685363, US2685363 A, US2685363A
InventorsFalk Joseph, John F Horahan
Original AssigneeFalk Joseph, John F Horahan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container having article retaining means
US 2685363 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3, 1954 J. FALK ET AL 2,685,363

CONTAINER HAVING ARTICLE RETAINING MEANS Filed July 24, 1950 ZSnventorg Patented Aug. 3, 1954 N E STATES CONTAINER HAVING ARTICLE RETAINING MEANS Joseph Falk and John II orahan,

, Glastonb ry. onn-r r;.

Application July 24, 1950, Serial No. 175,572

2 Claims. 1

The present invention relates to new and useful improvements for-receptacles or cases which serve to contain or hold tools or articles, and more particularly to receptacles with holding or securing means to prevent undesirable moving about or shifting-0f the tools or articles within the receptacle.

In many receptaclesheretofore used to hold or contain articles, insuflicient fastening means were present and the articles frequently moved or shifted about in the closed case and where thrown against each other to cause damage and breakage. This situation was undesirable not only in the case of frangible articles but also in the case of sharp edged or pointed instruments which would become dull or blunted as a result of such rough treatment. In many-receptacles, sufficient fastening means were employed but these were of such a nature that some time and effort would have to be expended to secure the articles against movement, or to release them for use, with the result that frequently the user would either utilize the fastening means to only a limited degree or ignore them completely to create a situation as undesirable as that existing with insufiicient fastening means. As a compromise, efforts have been directed to fastening means which would securely hold the articles in the closed receptacle but which could readily or automatically release the articles when the receptacle was opened. Such efiorts proved somewhat successful when the receptacle was kept closed and if the receptacle was carefully opened when it was positioned with its top side up.

However, should a receptacle of this type be opened when the wrong side was up, or if it was opened carelessly, then the articles would tumble out in disorder and be damaged. Anyone who has opened a receptacle of this nature is fully aware of the shortcomings and disadvantages involved. I

An object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle having fastening means to secure the articles therein when the receptacle is closed.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle having fastening means to secure the articles therein when the receptacle is closed but which is readily or automatically released to permit simple removal of the articles when the receptacle is fully open.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle wherein the articles contained therein remain fastened or secured during the opening of the receptacle but are released and readily available for use when the receptacle reaches'thefully opened position.

- An advantage ofthe present invention is the provision of an easily operable and simple fastening means to hold small articles of various shapes and sizes within a closed receptacle.

Another advantage -of-the present invention lies in the fact tha-tthe articles,-although secure- 1y fastened in the closed receptacle, are readily and easily available once the receptacle is fully open Still another advantage of the present invention lies in the fact that the articles within the receptacle are securely fastenedduring the opening of the receptacle and are not released until the receptacle is fully open.

A further advantage of the present invention is in the provision of shaped article or tool holders within the receptacle to receive special articles or tools which are securely held in position until needed, and inthe positioning of such article or tool holders in such a way as to brace or support one another.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description of the invention taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein an embodiment of the preferred form of the invention is shown. However, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the details disclosed, or to the tools or articles utilized but includes such variations and modifications as fallwithin the spirit of the invention.-

Referring to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is an isometric view of the improved receptacle in partially open position.

. Fig.2 is a side'view of the improved receptacle, also in partially open position.

Fig. 3 is an isometric view of the improved receptacle in fully open position.

Fig. 4 is across-sectional view of the improved receptacle in closed position.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken on the line 5-5 in Fig. 3, showing the main hinge construction.

Fig. Bis-a fragmentary sectional view, takenon the line 66 of Fig. 3, showing the tool holder in elevated position.

Fig 7 is a detail'view showing the corrugated sheet construction of the tool and drill holders.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings, the receptacle it comprises a base compartment. l2 and a cover compartment 14 which are pivoted together by hinges 16 so as to be capable of movement from a closed position (Fig. 4) to an open position (Fig. 3), and vice versa.

As shown in Fig. 1, a closure member or plate 18 is pivoted on hinges 20 on the lower edge of the front wall of the cover compartment is and is of such width as to extend from the hinges 29 to overlie the opposite edge of the cover compartment wall adjacent the main receptacle hinge l6. Portions of the closure plate 18 are suitably removed at 22 so that the remaining free edge portion 23 thereof may enter and fit between the receptacle hinges I6 and thus also overlie the rear wall of the base compartment. When the closure plate I8 is in such a position as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, it is held in positive fashion and provides an effective closure for the cover compartment Hi.

The base compartment and the cover compartment are substantially of the same size, as seen in Fig. 4, but, due to the lowered position of the hinge it on the rear wall of the base compartment, an onset relationship is created when the compartments are swung to the fully open position as shown in Fig. 3. The cover compartment will be lower and will maintain the base compartment in a very slightly inclined position, resting on its front edge.

The pivotal center of the receptacle hinges i6 is thus located behind the rear wall of the base compartment and below the top edge thereof. Such a location provides in addition to creating the offset relationship of the opened compartments, that when the receptacle is opened from the position shown in Fig. 4 to that shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the free edge 23 of the closure member is has just enough initial upward movement to clear the top edge of the rear wall of the base compartment and then move around in a downward and rearward arcuate movement to slip behind the top edge of the rear wall of the base compartment.

The mid-open position of the receptacle is shown in Fig. 2 and it is to be noted that the closure plate 18 may tend to spring forward slightly in this position but, due to the fact that its lower free edge 23 is to the rear of and lower than the top edge of the rear wall of the base compartment, it cannot spring open to any degree and is held in position by the rear wall.

Continued movement of the cover compartment M from the position shown in Figs. 1 and 2 to the fully open position shown in Fig. 3 similarly moves the free edge 23 of the closure plate 13 downwardly and pivotally around until it arrives at a position whereat its tendency to spring open is not opposed by the rear wall of the base compartment and it is then in position to be opened.

Thus, the closure plate I8 is maintained secureiy in position to close off the interior of the cover compartment when the receptacle is closed and during the time it is being opened. It is only at the moment when the receptacle reaches its fully open position that the closure plate i 8 is not held back but is permitted to open to permit access to the contents of the cover compartment. The rear wall of the base compartment thus, in effect, acts as a keeper for the closure member which closes off the cover compartment and the height of said rear wall and the locating of the hinges thus becomes a matter of importance.

The cover compartment 14 comprises a storage place for instruments or articles and one use of such space is for small tools as shown in Fig. 3. A tool holder 25 is formed of a U-shaped plate 26 whose legs are separated by an interposed corrugated sheet 28 and the spaces formed therein may be utilized for the insertion of tools, as shown. The tool holder 25 is secured to one arm 32 of the hinge 30; the other arm of which is secured, as by welding, to the base of the cover compartment.

As shown, the tool holder 25 is normally in a lowered horizontal position and the tools or instruments extend outwardly from their tool spaces approximately parallel to the base of the cover compartment and in a position to permit closing of the closure plate i8 and of the receptacle [9.

The hinge arm 32 extends at right angles to the plate 26 and serves as a thumb grip to facilitate the raising of the tool holder 25 to the vertical position shown in Fig. 6, in which position the hinge arm 32 will contact the cover compart ment to act as a stop abutment and supporting brace for the tool holder 25. In this position, the tools are readily available for removal and use.

The corrugations in the sheet 23 have been shown as regularly spaced but need not be regular and may be varied to form openings of different sizes for differently shaped tools. For tools such as reamers, drills, files, etc., which come in sets of progressively increasing sizes, the corrugations may increase at a regular rate and the separation of the spaced sides of the U-shaped plate 26 may be regularly increased to provide conveniently shaped housings of increasing size.

Sponge rubber pads 35, 35 may be placed on the opposed surfaces of the cover compartment base and the closure plate adjacent the lowered position of the tool holder 25 in order to pack the tools in resiliently and prevent any possible relative movement or shifting about of the tools. In the normal operation of the receptacle, the sponge rubber pads are made of a sufiicient thickness that is, approximately half the thickness of the compartment so as to be compressed slightly around the tools. The resistance of the pads to this compression in addition to forming a packing for the tools also normally urges the locking cover plate to spring open to a small degree. Thus, when the receptacle reaches its fully open position, and the closure plate is no longer restrained the pads will cause the closure plate to spring open slightly.

A thumb grip hole 36 may be formed in the locking plate cover to facilitate the lifting thereof when the receptacle is fully opened. Any particular size or shape or position thereof may be selected.

The base compartment 12 may comprise various partitions or brackets to support additional tools or articles. A drill rack 40 may be positioned in one corner of the base compartment and is of a similar construction to the tool holder 25 of the cover compartment M. A U-shaped plate 25' and a corrugated sheet 23' are used of a similar nature as described heretofore. Regularly varying spaces are preferred in the corrugated sheet 28, if a drill set is to be inserted therein.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the drill rack is so positioned at an angle to the wall of the base compartment l2 that, when the drills are inserted therein in the proper order, the points thereof will fit snugly in aligned fashion parallel to and immediately adjacent the wall to prevent excessive movement of the drills when the drill rack is horizontal. Should the drills b inserted in improper order, or reversed, the drill rack 40 will be unable to be seated and an automatic check is therefore provided for proper positioning of the drills.

The hinge arm 32' of the drill rack performs a similar function to the hinge arm 32 of the tool holder but, in addition, is made of such a height as to contact the closure plate I 8 when the receptacle is closed. Such an abutting contact provides several advantages. Added support is given to the closure plate 18 to prevent flexing or bowing thereof and to maintain it in proper position. Additionally, it has been found that the hinge 30 is given reciprocal support from the closure plate when the receptacle is closed and curbs any tendency of said hinge 30' to rotate and thus prevents any undesirable movement of the drills or of the drill rack.

Inasmuch as the drill rack 40 is carefully positioned in the base compartment at an angle to the edge wall so that the drills may fit snugly therein, movement of the drills is especially objectionable. Therefore, the pivot of the hinge 30 is so arranged with respect to the hinge arm 32' and the height of the hinge arm 32' is so devised that the top of the hinge arm presses against the locking plate cover and mutually keep each other from moving while the receptacle is closed. Consideration of Figs. 1 and 4 will disclose the locating of the supporting hinge arm 32' between the pivot and the drill rack whereby movement or shifting of the drill rack is prevented.

Additionally, of course, the hinge arm 32' serves as a thumb grip to facilitate the elevating of the drill rack to the vertical position, and also as a stop abutment and supporting brace when the drill rack 40 is so elevated.

A catch 42 may be provided to secure the cover compartment and base compartment in position when the receptacle is closed.

Although the invention has been illustrated and described with reference to tools of a nature as are generally employed in tool-kits for gas meters or similar equipment, the invention is not to be considered limited thereto but is of application to any receptacle which holds or contains tools, instruments or articles of a similar nature of varying shapes and sizes.

Similarly, the closure plate need not be limited to use with the cover compartment but could be hinged to the base compartment as well, in a mere reversal of parts. Additionally, the closure plate need not extend for the full length of the compartment but may be subdivided, as desired, to form several compartments.

Additionally, the application of the invention is not limited merely to two compartments but could be used with more compartments. For example, there could be other compartments under the base compartment, or a similar receptacle could be connected to one of the compartments. One specific variation would be to pivot a second receptacle to the lower right-hand edge of the receptacle I 0, as shown in Fig. 4, so that it could be swung under the receptacle ID to form a four layer receptacle, or a four side-by-side compartmented receptacle when opened. The pivot could be arranged to prevent interference with the catch 42, or the catch could be placed on the side of the receptacle.

Variations and modifications may be made within the scope of the claims and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

We claim:

1. In a receptacle of the character described, a first compartment having flat front, rear and end walls and a closed side; a second compartment having flat front, rear and end walls and a closed side; hinges on the rear walls of said compartments at their open sides extending along a part only of said wall and connecting said compartments to form a closed receptacle with the edges of the walls in aligned relation and adapted to be converted into a fully opened receptacle having compartments, the pivot axis of the hinges being disposed below the plane of the upper edge of the first compartment; and a transverse member hingedly connected to the front wall of and extending across said second compartment, said member having a portion extending between the aligned rear walls when said second compartment is in closed relation with said first compartment, said portion lying only between said part of the rear walls unconnected by the hinges and said hinges causing said portion of the member to move behind and below the top edge of the rear wall of said first compartment to be locked thereby during opening of the receptacle to prevent the opening of the second compartment until said first and second compartments are substantially fully opened.

2. In a receptacle of the character described, a first compartment having flat front, rear and end walls and a closed side; a second compartment having flat front, rear and. end walls and a closed side; spaced hinges on the rear walls of said compartments at their open sides extending along a part only of said walls and connecting said compartments to form a closed receptacle adapted to be converted into a fully opened receptacle having compartments; and a closure plate hingedly connected to the front wall of and closing off said second compartment, said closure plate having a portion extending between the hinged edges and overlying the top edge of the rear wall of said first compartment when in closed position, said portion lying only between said part of the rear walls unconnected by said hinges and said hinges having a pivotal axis behind the rear wall of said first compartment and below the plane of the top edge thereof whereby said portion of the closure plate extending between the unconnected parts of said rear walls will move behind and below the top edge of the rear wall of said first compartment to be locked thereby during opening of the receptacle to prevent the opening of the second compartment until said first and second compartments are substantially fully opened.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 275,882 Brownell Apr. 17, 1883 750,317 Crenshaw Feb. 2, 1904 979,981 Milke Dec. 27, 1910 1,460,499 Plumb July 3, 1923 1,495,443 Rosser May 27, 1924 1,708,006 Aske Apr. 9, 1929 1,744,388 Johnson Jan. 21, 1930 1,813,256 Radkus July 7, 1931 2,033,315 Woodberry Mar. 10, 1936 2,075,987 Houck Apr. 6, 1937 2,437,595 Douglass Mar. 9, 1948 2,439,004 Hurley Apr. 6, 1948 2,519,662 Kempken Aug. 22, 1950 2,527,161 Tyll Oct. 24, 1950 2,572,706 Eichholz Oct. 23, 1951

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2996172 *Dec 5, 1958Aug 15, 1961John MellemaTool box for containing tools of various sizes and utilities
US2999621 *Apr 7, 1959Sep 12, 1961Product Dev CorpFoldable tackle box
US3096877 *Oct 2, 1961Jul 9, 1963Thorsen Mfg CompanyPackages and methods of packaging
US3185853 *Sep 25, 1961May 25, 1965Control Data CorpAssembly of small photosensitive fragile elements
US3317076 *May 26, 1964May 2, 1967Black & Decker Mfg CoPlastic case
US3348329 *Mar 17, 1965Oct 24, 1967Medallion Ind IncFishing tackle box
US3380573 *Jul 18, 1966Apr 30, 1968Clay Adams IncCase for dissecting kit
US3936937 *Nov 19, 1973Feb 10, 1976Gordon Woodford WTransport case for gnathological apparatus and gnathostomatic appliances
US4470488 *Apr 6, 1983Sep 11, 1984Alphe BroussardCarrying case for health program
US6083579 *Dec 7, 1993Jul 4, 2000The Plastic Forming Company, Inc.Blow molded article
US6164442 *Aug 19, 1999Dec 26, 2000Stravitz; David M.Multi-part, multi-fold, multi-compartment portable carrying and storage case
US6321925 *Jan 23, 2001Nov 27, 2001Avaya Technology Corp.Multiple layer hinged enclosure
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/328, 220/522, 312/200, 312/902, 206/523
International ClassificationB25H3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB25H3/02, Y10S312/902
European ClassificationB25H3/02