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Publication numberUS2685962 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1954
Filing dateAug 4, 1952
Publication numberUS 2685962 A, US 2685962A, US-A-2685962, US2685962 A, US2685962A
InventorsJoseph S. Druth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wardrobe container
US 2685962 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 10, 1954 J. 5. DRUTH WARDROBE CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 4, 1952 I INVENTOR Josephs. P1 u, t h.

8Y2 ATTORNEY;

Aug. 10, 1954 J. s. DRUTH 2,685,962

WARDROBE CONTAINER Filed Aug. 4, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Josephs. Pr uth.

ATTORNEY5 Patented Aug. 10, 1954 WARDROBE CONTAINER Joseph S. Druth, Oak Park, 111., assignor to Chippewa Paper Products Company, Inc., Chicago, Ill.

Application August 4, 1952, Serial No. 302,534

This invention relates to a corrugated board wardrobe.

g for each group of clothing.

A further object of this invention is to provide a wardrobe which is formed out of corrugated board and includes an inner wooden frame which will support relatively heavy articles and will relieve the outer shell from any. strain.

A further object of this invention is to provide a wardrobe which includes a garment hanger bar and means for clamping garment hangers on said bar whereby the hangers will be held against shifting.

With the above and other objects in view, my invention consists in the arrangement, combination and details of construction disclosed in the drawings and specification, and then more particularly pointed out in the appended claim.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is an exploded perspective view of the inner elements of a wardrobe constructed according to an embodiment of this invention.

Figure 2 is a vertical section of the wardrobe with the outer casing mounted on the inner casmg.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 33 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 44 of Figure 2.

Referring to the drawings and first to Figure 1, the numeral I designates generally a lower inner housing which is formed of front and rear walls II and I2 and opposite side walls l3 and I4. The upper end of the lower housing [0 is open and a lower end is closed by means of inner bottom flaps l5 and I6 and outer bottom flaps H and I8. A skeleton inne frame structure generally indicated at I9 is adapted to be disposed within the inner housing member ID and is of a height to project a slight distance above the upper edge of the inner member ID.

The frame structure I 9 is formed of oppositely disposed frame members 20 which are formed of vertical outer bars 2| and 22, an inner vertical bar 23, and upper and lower connecting bars 24 and 25. A rectangular frame bracing and cover- 1 Claim. (Cl. 206-7) ing sheet 26, which is formed of corrugated material, is secured to the inner face of each frame member 20, being secured thereto as by staples or other suitable fastening means.

The upper bar 24 of each frame member is provided with an opening 21, and a round connecting bar 28 is adapted to be seated within the openings 21. A lower round connecting bar 29 is mounted in openings 30, which are formed in the lower bar 25. The upper bar 28 forms a hanger bar and is secured in the opening 21 by means of a nail or other securing means 3|. The lower bar 29 is secured in the lower bar 25 by means of nails or other fastening means 32.

The hanger bar 28 is adapted to have garment hangers 33 mounted thereon, and the hooks of the hangers 33 are adapted to be clamped to the bar 28 by means of a clamping bar 34. The clamping bar 34 extends between the upper frame members 24 and a pair of bolts 35 is extended through bar and through bar 28. A wing nut 36 is threaded on each bolt 35 on the lower side of bar 28 so that bar 34 will be tightl clamped relative to bar 28 and the hooks of the hangers 33. Clamping bar 34 holds the hangers 33 against sliding movement along the bar 28 and also holds the hangers from slipping off of the bar 23 in the event the wardrobe is turned sidewise or upended.

A cap member generally designated as 31 is adapted to telescope over the projecting portion of the frame structure [9 and is formed of front and rear corrugated walls 38 and 39, opposite side walls 48 and 4|, and a top wall structure which is formed of inwardly projecting side flaps 42 and front and rear upper flaps 43 and 44. The flaps I1 and 18, which form the outer bottom for the lower housing member I0, may be secured together by a tape or the like, and the upper flaps 43 and 44 may also be secured together along their inner meeting edges by means of an adhesive tape or other suitable fastening means.

The inner wardrobe structure hereinbefore described is adapted to be contained within an outer container embodying a lower housing 45 and a telescoping cap or upper housing member 46. The upper housing member or cap 46 is adapted to telescope over cap 31, and lower edges of the cap 46 are secured to the bottom member 45 by means of an adhesive tape 4'! or the like.

The wardrobe structure shown in Figure 1 may, when not in use, be collapsed to flat form and initially the connecting bars 28 and 29 will be free from the side frame members 20. When it is desired to set up the wardrobe structure, the

The outer container or enclosure for athe-ward robe may then be telescoped over the inner wardrobe structure by placing the lower m'ember l0 into the lower member?and-exteridingthe cap 46 over the cap 31 and partly over the lower enclosure or container 45. l'flihewwardrobeehereinbefore described is adapted to be formedout of corrugated board and will provide" a sealed housing or wardrobe for-"receiving clothing which may be ="shipped- -brclothing which is placed in a warehouse-=or-"other storage. Y

T-his wardrobe structure *Will provide a "very convenient means fodharigi-ng garments" without wrinkling the g'armerita'and it willlbe understood that by se'aling the-wardrobe A structure, a disinfectant maybe *placed within "the inner structuresothat' the garments withintheward- -'robe' will--not--=-be -"damaged-'=by moths orother insects.

I do not mean to--corifine myself to the exact details of constructiori' here'in disclosed; but claim all variations falling within' the purviewof the appended claim.

what is cla'imed'is:

' A container comprising "an elongated :outer lower housing havinga substantially rectangular '--transversecross sectional configurationand hav- '-=ing opposed' open and closed-endaan inner lower housing having=-asubstantially= rectangular configuration-and havinga pair of opposed open and --closed=-ends, said innerlower' housing being disof said inner lower housing, upper and lower "spacer bars connected to and supported between "iithe'mppei sand lower ends of said frame members, an uppertinner housing having. a substantially rectangular:"configuration in cross-section and having a pair'iofifiopposed open and closed ends,

said upper inner housing encompassing the exposed odter sielesfiof the projecting ends of said frame members with said closed end thereof jabu'tting against the ends of said frame members and .its open end telescopically engaging around a "the open'erid-"of said inner lower housing;-- '-and an,elo ngated outer. upper, housing having asub- "stantially rectangular transverse--cross=sectional configuratiorr'arrd opposed "open" and closed ends,

'sai'd 'outeriuppenhousing envelop upperhousing"Withthecl'osed ends"of-said; outer and inner upper housingsin 'juxtapo'sitionpsaid outerv upper housing being"elongated'andfprojecting beyond said iop'en "end or 'said inner-"upper housing for? telescopic "i'engag'ement about; said open end of said lower;outer""housing.

References 'flitd rr the "file "of this patent IINITEDQSTA'IIES, PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1939339 *Jul 17, 1931Dec 12, 1933Joseph M PriceContainer
US2215695 *Jul 9, 1938Sep 24, 1940Jack GinsbergMerchandise shipping container
US2357309 *Dec 13, 1939Sep 5, 1944Pak Rak IncContainer
US2455739 *Jun 2, 1945Dec 7, 1948Nivison Weiskopf CompanyCollapsible storage cabinet
US2575770 *Oct 18, 1950Nov 20, 1951Columbus Plastic Products IncNesting kitchen canister set
US2581105 *May 25, 1948Jan 1, 1952Container CorpTextile container with slotted corners
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2805767 *May 10, 1955Sep 10, 1957Phoenix Closet Accessories IncDevice for protecting and hanging trousers
US2822093 *Jun 1, 1956Feb 4, 1958Graci Louis WPacking and shipping container
US2889921 *Nov 23, 1956Jun 9, 1959American Pulley CoContainer for wire
US2974779 *Apr 29, 1957Mar 14, 1961Belsinger Samuel PWardrobe
US3096923 *Nov 23, 1960Jul 9, 1963Lawrence PillerMoving and storage container and strengthening frame therefor
US3112027 *May 2, 1962Nov 26, 1963Harry FieldHanger support bar for garment packing case
US3235069 *Sep 21, 1962Feb 15, 1966Eschmann Bros & Walsh LtdSterile container
US4079840 *Oct 6, 1976Mar 21, 1978Usner Daniel CClothes hanger bridle for a garment trolley bar
US4234088 *May 26, 1978Nov 18, 1980Berkowitz Irving MFabric hanger
US4402404 *Jun 1, 1982Sep 6, 1983Container Corporation Of AmericaInsert for garment box
US4576280 *Apr 5, 1984Mar 18, 1986Anna Lena DoveHanging garment container
US4753355 *May 2, 1986Jun 28, 1988Interstore Transfer Specialists, Inc.Hanger storage assembly
US6223915Feb 16, 1999May 1, 2001International Retail Services Group Inc.Apparatus for securely retaining a plurality of garment hangers
US8016138Oct 6, 2008Sep 13, 2011Wenger CorporationHanger retainer device, system, and methods for retaining hangers on a rod
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/279
International ClassificationA47B47/06, A47B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B47/06
European ClassificationA47B47/06