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Publication numberUS2686626 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 17, 1954
Filing dateOct 29, 1951
Priority dateOct 29, 1951
Publication numberUS 2686626 A, US 2686626A, US-A-2686626, US2686626 A, US2686626A
InventorsEdward J Slattery
Original AssigneeEdward J Slattery
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic filling nozzle
US 2686626 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 17, 1954 E. J. SLATTERY 2,686,626

AUTOMATIC FILLING NOZZLE Filed Oct. 29, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR [War/M1243? ATTORNEY 1954 E. J. SLATTERY AUTOMATIC FILLING NOZZLE Filed Opt. 29. 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 llllllllllllllllulmm INVENTOR ATTORNEY Aug. 17, 1954 E. J. SLA'ITERY 2,686,626

AUTOMATIC FILLING NOZZLE Filed Oct. 29, 1951 :s Sheets-Sheet 5 7 are 67 6 5a 79 r 6 4 66 7/ 8o INVENTOR A dn drd JZ die/ ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 17, 1954 UNITED STATES BEST AVAILABLE CQPY FATENT OFFICE (Granted under Title 35, U. S. Code (1952),

see. 266) The invention described herein, if patented,

may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to me of any royalty thereon.

This invention relates to automatic nozzles for dispe gasoline or other liquid, and has for M ary object to provide a filling nozzle which is i lly automatic, that is to say, one which is automatically opened when placed in the neck of a container or the like, automatically closed when removed from the container or the like, is automatically closed when the container is approximately full, and yet which may be also manually operated in the conventional manner or semiutomatically operated, as desired.

Another object of the invention consists in the construction of a nozzle having an automatic iut rfi valve provided with a hydrodynamic latch ich is hydraulically operated.

A further object of the invention resides in construction of an automatic nozzle of sim ple design and relatively few parts, and which is so constructed that failure of its functions is reduced to a minimum.

Another object of the invention consists in provr an automatic nozzle which is so dethat ianure or" the working parts will cause the valve to close so as to cut oil the flow or" liquid through the nozzle, thereby preventing liability of fires, explosions, etc; in other words, if the nozzle fails it will fail safe.

Another object of the invention consists in providing an automatic nozzle which is fully open at its discharge end so that it may be of sufiiciently small diameter to permit its insertion into containers having narrow necks.

A still further object of the invention resides in the provision of an automatic nozzle which is so constructed that it will not restrict the flow of fluid b low that of the input line and which will not allow air to enter the line or nozzle.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which,

Figure l is a side elevational view of the filling nozzle with parts broken away and showing the valve in open position;

Figure 1(a) is a side elevational view partly in section showing the free end of the discharge tube and a part of the slidable sleeve for automatically opening the valve;

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure l but showing the parts in closed or inoperative position;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of a portion of the nozzle as shown in Figures 1 and 2;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary view of a modified form of nozzle so constructed as to eliminate the need for a sensing tube;

Figures 5 and 6 are fragmentary sectional views through the closure valve and related parts of two different forms of automatic nozzles in which a sensing tube is employed.

Referring to the drawings in greater detail and particularly to Figures 1, 2 and 3 the numeral l indicates the automatic nozzle generally, and which is provided with a longitudinal passage 2 extending therethrough and provided with a valve seat 3. .The passage 2 through the body of the nozzle opens into a discharge tube 4 which is intended to be projected into a container or tank to be filled with liquid from a source with which the nozzle is connected.

The valve for cooperating with the valve seat 3 is a reciprocating valve preferably formed of plastic and indicated by the numeral 5. This valve 5 is reciprocably mounted in an inverted cup or cage 6 which is open at its upper and lower ends and is provided with a valve seat I for cooperation with a pilot valve to be later described. This cup 6 serves as a vacuum chamber in temporarily maintaining the valve in open position. The lower edge of the cup is spaced slightly above the plane of the valve seat 3 to provide a relatively narrow annular passageway 2' for a purpose to be later described. The inverted cup 6 may be integrally formed with and depends from a ring 8 which is disposed within an opening 9- formed in the top of the nozzle. The ring 8 and cup 6 may be connected by a plurality of more or less vertically disposed arms or by a continuous member such as the element H) provided with openings H for the passage of liquid to the upper surface of the pilot valve.

Extending across the top of the ring 8 is a flexible diaphragm 12 formed of any suitable material and secured to an outer inverted cup [3 by means of screws M. This diaphragm extends beyond the periphery of the ring 8 and may act as a seal between the inverted cup i3 and the body I of the nozzle when the cup I3 is secured in position to clamp the diaphragm in place as by means of screws [5.

The valve body 5 is threaded or otherwise connected to a valve stem 16 which depends from the valve 5 and is provided on its lower end with a head ll reciprocably mounted in a sleeve 48 slidably mounted in the lower portion of the body or" the nozzle. The sleeve I8 is provided on its exterior surface with a cutaway portion to provide an external shoulder 19 and on its interior surface with a cutaway portion to provide a BEST AVAILABLE COPY shoulder '25. The shoulder 19 cooperates with a coil spring 2! which at its upper end is seated against the body of the nozzle and serves to depress the sleeve l8- downwardly against an operating dog as hereinafter referred to in more detail. The lower end of the valve stem it passes through a constricted opening in the upper end of the sleeve is and the inner surface of the upper wall of the sleeve cooperates with the head El to normally draw the valve downwardly onto its seat 3. The valve 5 may be mechanically raised from its seat by means of a plunger 22 reciprocably mounted within the sleeve l8 and provided with a shoulder 23 against which is seated a coil spring 24 which abuts at its upper end against the internal shoulder 25 heretofore mentioned.

If it is desired to open the valve manually a handle 25 is provided and is pivoted to the body of the nozzle as indicated by the numeral 25. This handle is provided with a bearing portion 27 for cooperation with the lower end of the plunger 22 so as to raise it and thereby raise the valve stem l8 and valve 5 to open the passage through the nozzle. It should be noted also that the handle 25 also bears against the lower end of the sleeve l8, and when the sleeve is raised by the operation of the handle the pressure of spring 2! is removed from the valve stem 16 and of the valve 5. In this operation it should also be noted that there is a lost motion connection between the plunger 22 and the valve stem l5 so that when the handle 25 is released and returned to its normal position the valve may remain open while the plunger 22 descends with the handle due to the operation of the spring 24.

As heretofore mentioned the nozzle disclosed herein may be opened automatically as the discharge tube 4 is inserted in the neck of a container, tank or the like. To this end a sleeve 28 is slidably mounted on the exterior of the discharge tube 4 and at its lower end has secured an external ring 25 provided with radiating fins 30 adapted to engage the neck of the container and push the sleeve upwardly along the discharge tube 4 against pressure of a coil spring 3!. This spring 3! is seated at its lower end in an annular pocket provided in a ring 32 fixed to the upper end of the sleeve, and has its upper end in engagement with the threaded fixture 33 secured in the body of the nozzle.

The ring 32 fixed to the upper end of the slidable sleeve 28 serves as a cam to swing the operating dog 34 about its pivot which is the pin 26 on which the handle 25 is also pivoted. The dog 34 is provided with a sloped surface 35 against which the ring 32 en ages to swing the dog about its pivot 26, and the portion of the dog beyond the pivot 25 is bifurcated so as to permit it to rise upwardly without interfering with the handle 25 or the plunger 22 which latter serves to open the valve 5. In order that the valve may be opened when the discharge tube 4 is passed into the container to be filled, a pivoted latch 35 is connected to the handle 25 as indicated by the numeral 37. This latch is mounted in an elongated slot 38 formed in the body of the handle. The latch is provided with a shoulder 35 adjacent its lower end, and this shoulder normally extends beyond the body of the handle by reason of the pressure of a spring 40 which has one end operates with the handle 25 to limit the outward movement of the shoulder 39. The upper end of the latch is provided with a camming portion 4| extending beyond the pivot point 37 and adapted to contact the body portion 42 of the nozzle when the handle 25 is lifted by reason of a crossbar 43 on the free end of the dog engaging the shoulder 35 on the latch, as clearly indicated in Figure 1. When the cam surface 4| engages the part 42 of the nozzle the latch 38 is swung in a clockwise direction against the pressure of spring 40 and thereby disengages its shoulder 35 from the crossbar 43 thus allowing the handle 25 to return to its normal position as shown in full lines in Figure 1. This return of the operating handle 25 to its lowermost position permits the valve operating plunger 22 to return to its inoperative position by reason of the pressure of spring 24 thereby disengaging the head ll of the valve stem l6 so that the valve 5 would be free to return to its closed position except for the fact that the valve will be retained in its open position by reason of the hydrodynamic latch hereinafter referred to. It should be noted in this connection that while the handle 25 returns to its normal position the operating dog 34 is still retained in its uppermost position because its cam portion 35 is still engaged by the operating ring 32, and the sleeve i8 is still retained in its uppermost position due to the fact that it is supported on the arms of the dog 34 so that the valve stem is relieved of the closing pressure which would otherwise be exerted by the spring 2|.

In order to provide for the automatic closing of the valve 5 after the liquid in a container being filled has reached a pre-determined level a sensing tube 44 is positioned on the interior of the discharge tube 4 and is provided with an outlet 45 communicating with an outlet aperture 45 formed adjacent the lower end of the tube 4. This sensing tube 44 extends upwardly through the discharge tube 4 and its upper end is positioned in the body of the nozzle l and opens into a passage 41 formed in the body of the inverted cup 13 which is secured on the outer face of the nozzle body for clamping the diaphragm 12 in position and suspending the inverted cup 6 in the passageway of the nozzle. The passage 47 opens into the chamber 48 of cup [3 so as to apply the pressure passing up through the tube 44 onto the upper surface of the diaphragm l2.

The pilot valve heretofore referred to generally is indicated by the numeral 49 and is provided with a stem 50 which is secured to the center of the diaphragm 12 by the nut 51. A spring 52 has its lower end seated on the flanged nut 5| and its upper end in engagement with a threaded plug 53 so that the pressure on the spring 52 and diaphragm I2 may be suitably adjusted to normally equalize the pressures on both sides of the diaphragm. When the liquid in the container reaches the outlets 45, 45 of the sensing tube 44 and discharge tube 4 the liquid will pass into the tube 44 and create a pressure therein above atmospheric, and this pressure passes through the passage 41 into the chamber 43 and. onto the upper surface of the diaphragm $2. This abnormal pressure depresses the diaphragm and thereby opens the pilot valve 49 thus admitting liquid onto the upper surface of the valve 5. In this connection it should be noted that the liquid passing through the passageway 2 must pass through the narrow annular passage 2' BEST AVAILABLE COPY formed between the lower end of the inverted cup or cage 6 and the body of the nozzle thereby producing a Venturi effect and evacuating air from about the periphery of the valve 5 and the interior of the cup ii which is sealed at its upper end by the engagement of the pilot valve 49 with its seat I. It is the vacuum thus created by this Venturi effect which maintains the valve in open position after the valve-operating handle 25 has been released and moved to its lower position by its own weight and because of the pressure of the spring-pressed plunger 22 against the bearing portion 21 of the handle.

In the operation of the device as a fully automatic nozzle the discharge tube A is inserted into the neck of the container to be filled and this operation forces the sleeve 28 upwardly due to the engagement of the fins 3i) against the neck of the container. This movement of the sleeve 28 and its ring 32 causes the latter to engage the cam surface 35 of the operating dog 34 so as to swing the latter in a counterclockwise direction thereby causing the bar 43 to engage the projection 39 of latch 36 so as to raise the handle 25 together with the sleeve i8 and the plunger 22. The plunger 22 in turn travels through its lost motion connection with the valve stem !6 and eventually engages the head H and lifts the valve 5 to its open position as shown in Figure 1. In this movement of the handle 25 the cam surface 4l of the latch 36 engages part 12 of the body of the nozzle so as to disengage its shoulder 39 from the crossbar 53 on operating dog 3 and permits the handle to return to its normal position through the medium of gravity and the pressure of spring-pressed plunger 22. The sleeve i8, however, has its bearing on the arms of the operating dog 34 and consequently the sleeve remains in its elevated position, and there is no downward pressure on the head ll of the valve stem it during this phase of the operation. When the liquid reaches the lower end of the discharge tube 4 and passes into the sensing tube 44 the increased pressure created in this tube passes into the chamber 18 of the inverted cup I3 as heretofore described, and this pressure causes the diaphragm l2 to be biased downwardly to open the pilot valve til. Upon this movement of the valve 45 the liquid will pass onto the top of valve 5 thereby breaking the vacuum formed by the Venturi action of the liquid passing through the annular passage 2 and permit the valve 5 to descend upon its seat by the action of gravity and normal atmospheric pressure. When the nozzle is removed from the container being filled the pressure of spring 3! will cause the sleeve 28 to slide downwardly along the tube 4 and thereby remove cam ring 32 from engagement with the cam portion 35 or" the operating dog 3a which latter is returned to its normal position partly by gravity and partly by the pressure of spring-pressed plunger !8 on the upper surface of that portion of the operating dog to the right of its pivot point 26.

The foregoing operation and description of the nozzle relates to its use when being used as fully automatic. It is to be understood, however, that the nozzle may be operated as only semi-automatic in which instance there would be no need for the latch 38. In this semi-automatic operation the attendant will raise the handle 25 to open the valve 5, as he grasps the nozzle in the usual manner; he may thereafter, however, release the handle 25 so that it will return to normal position inasmuch as the vacuum created in the cup 8 by the Venturi action will hold the valve in open position and the dog 3 will maintain the sleeve I8 in its elevated position to eliminate the closing action of the spring 2! on the sleeve i8, head El and valve stem I6. Also, the nozzle may be operated as fully manual by inserting the discharge tube t only part way into the neck of the container being filled so as to avoid operation of the dog 34, and then lifting the handle 25.

The form of the invention shown in Figure 5 is quite similar to that shown in Figures 1 and 2 and will therefore be described only as to the structural difierences from that shown in the first form of the invention. In Figure 5 the nozzle is indicated generally by the numeral 50, the sensing tube by the numeral 6i, the passage through the nozzle by the numeral 62 and the Venturi passage by the numeral 63.

The valve which is substantially identical with that shown in the earlier form of the invention is indicated by the numeral 64 and cooperates with valve seat 65 which is located in the passageway E2. The inverted cup 56 forms a guideway for the reciprocating valve t4 and is secured in position in the opening 61 in the top of the nozzle by means of screws 68 threaded into the inverted cup 69 mounted exterior of the nozzle body and serving to clamp the diaphragm in in position.

In this form of the invention the upper portion of the inverted cup is of solid formation except for the radial passageways H which admit liquid into the cylinder 72 provided with the vertically reciprocable valve body or piston 13. This element 73 is provided with a tapered seat i l for cooperation with valve seat it formed in the body of the cup just below the passageways H. The valve '53 is attached to the diaphragm ill and a spring is has one end in contact with the diaphragm, while its opposite end engages an adjusting plug 'i'l whereby the diaphragm may be properly balanced.

The sensing tube 6! in the form of the invention now being described communicates with a passage 18 in the body of the cup 69, and this passageway communicates with an aperture 19 in the diaphragm it, which in turn communicates with the opening til provided in the upper end of the cup or spider 63. By this arrangement it will be noted that when liquid enters the lower end of the sensing tube 8! the pressure created thereby will be transmitted to the underside of the diaphragm lil. This increase in pressure on the underside of the diaphragm overcomes the pressure of the springs l6 and the diaphragm is flexed upwardly and draws with it the valve body or piston 73, thereby uncovering the inner ends of the passages H in the cup 66 and permitting liquid to pass from the passageway 62 in the nozzle and thence to the upper side of the valve 64 causing it to descend onto its seat 65. Here again the pressure in the sensing tube causes the opening of the pilot valve or piston 73 thereby breaking the vacuum formed in the inverted cup, and closing the valve 5 3 by hydraulic action.

The form of the invention shown in Figure 6 is substantially identical with that shown in Figure 5, except for the fact that the pilot valve or plunger 8%] is spring-pressed upwardly against the diaphragm 3! instead of being permanently connected thereto as in the form shown in Figure 5. The spring for biasing the pilot valve upwardly against the diaphragm is indicated by the numeral 82, and when the pressure is increased in BEST AVAILABLE COPY the sensing tube 83 the diaphragm is flexed upwardly against the pressure of spring 84, thus allowing spring 82 to raise the valve 80 to expose the apertures 85 in the sleeve 86, which serves to guide the pilot valve, and permit liquid to pass from the passageway 81 of the nozzle into the passage 88 formed in the body of the inverted cup 89 and pass downwardly onto the top of the reciprocating control valve 90 to bydraulically force the same onto its seat 9|. In order to prevent the escape of liquid from the upper end of the guide sleeve 86, a flexible diaphragm 92 is secured to the upper end of the sleeve and encompasses the upper end of the valve body 80. Also, in order to avoid the formation of an air lock or the like in the upper end of the guide sleeve 86, the valve body 80 is provided with one or more longitudinally extending passageways 93 to permit the escape of fluid from above the valve body into the interior of the nozzle. In other respects the operation of this form of the invention is substantially identical with that shown in Figure 5.

The form of the invention shown in Figure 4 while a fully automatic, semi-automatic or manually operated type, is nevertheless somewhat different from the several forms of the invention heretofore described, in that a sensing tube is unnecessary to its successful operation. In this form the nozzle is indicated generally by the numeral Hi and is provided with the passageway I0! communicating with the discharge nozzle I62. The inverted cup or cage which encloses and guides the shut off valve 103 is designated by the numeral I04 and is spaced slightly above the valve seat I05, so as to provide the heretofore mentioned Venturi effect as the liquid is discharged through the nozzle. This annular passageway is indicated by the numeral I06.

The cag HM, which includes the inverted cup for the valve I03, is secured in the opening I01 in the top of the nozzle by means of screw bolts I08 threaded into the inverted cup I09 on the exterior of the nozzle, and between the upper end of the cage HM and the lower edge of the cup I09 the flexible diaphragm I I0 is clamped in position. Secured to the underside of the diaphragm Ht as by means of screw bolt III is a pilot valve H2, the diaphragm is balanced by means of a spring H3 and the adjustable plug H4.

The cage [04 is provided adjacent its upper end with a plurality of openings or passageways H5 which permit the flow of liquid into the space between the pilot valve and th diaphragm H0. In this particular form of the invention the Venturi effect is present when the nozzle is in operation, and the valve 03 having been once raised off of its seat in any of the various manners heretofore described is held in open position by the vacuum created in the lower or cup portion of cage I94. When, however, the liquid in the container being filled rises above the lower end of the discharge tube I02, a back pressure is created in the passageway "ll of the nozzle and thereby increases the pressure on the lower side of the diaphragm H4, due to the fact that the pressure operates on a greater area on the underside of the diaphragm than it does on the pilot valve H2, thus causing the valve to open and permitting liquid to pass onto the top of the valve I63 and break the vacuum which was sustaining the valve in open position and allowing the same to close.

From the foregoing description taken in connection with the attached drawings, it will be noted that I have devised a filling nozzle of rather simple construction which may be operated as fully automatic, semi-automatic or manually, and in which the control valve is sustained in open position by a vacuum which is automatically broken when the liquid in the container being filled reaches a predetermined level.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described what I now consider to be the preferred forms of the filling nozzle, but since various changes may be made in structural details without departing from the essence of the invention, it is intended that all such changes be included within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of the passage, an inverted cup provided with a passage therethrough and spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect, a reciprocably-mounted valve positioned in the cup for cooperation with the valve seat, means for opening the valve and releasing the same, said valve being maintained in open position by a vacuum formed by the Venturi effect, and means for automatically breaking the vacuum when a container is filled to a predetermined level.

2. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of the passage, an inverted cup provided with a passage therethrough,, a reciprocably-mounted valve positioned in the cup for cooperation with the valve seat, said cup being spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the venturi once the valve is opened, and a pilot valve for breaking said vacuum under certain conditions.

3. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of said passage, an inverted cup provided with a passage therethrough, a reciprocably-mounted valve positioned in the cup for cooperation with the valve seat, said cup being spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a venturi effect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the venturi once the valve is opened, lost-motion means for opening the valve, and means for automatically breaking the vacuum when a container is filled to a predetermined level, said means including a pilot valve for controlling the iiow of liquid to the upper face of the first-mentioned valve.

4. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of said passage, an inverted cup provided with a passage therethrough, a reciprocably-mounted valve positioned in the cup for cooperation with the valve seat, said cup being spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect to maintain the valve Open by the vacuum produced by the venturi once the valve is opened, lost-motion means for opening the valve, and means including a diaphragm controlled pilot valve for controlling the flow of liquid to the upper face of the first-mentioned valve.

5, An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of said passage, an inverted cup provided with a passage therethrough, a reciprocably-mounted valve positioned in the cup for cooperation with the valve seat, said cup being spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the Venturi once the valve is opened, lost-motion means for opening the valve, means including a diaphragm controlled pilot valve for controlling the flow of liquid to the upper face of the first-mentioned valve, and a sensing tube having one end positioned adjacent the outer end of the discharge tube and the other end communicating with a side of the diaphragm.

6. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of said passage, an inverted cup provided with a passage therethrough, a reciprocably-mounted valve positioned in the cup for cooperation with the valve seat, said cup being spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the Venturi once the valve is opened, lost-motion means for opening the valve, means for automatically breaking the vacuum when a container is filled to a predetermined level, said means including a pilot valve for controlling the flow of liquid to the upper face of the first-mentioned valve, and means supplementing the pressure on one side of the diaphragm.

7. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a valve therefor, a discharge tube communicating with one end of the passage, an inverted open-ended cup spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the Venturi once the valve is opened, a valve seat surrounding the opening in the inverted cup and extending upwardly therefrom, a pilot valve normally pressed downwardly onto the seat with a portion of the valve extended outwardly beyond the valve seat, said nozzle provided with one or more passageways extending from the passage to the pilot valve.

8. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve seat, a valve therefor, a discharge tube communicating with one end of the passage, an inverted open-ended cup spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi eifect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the Venturi once the valve is opened, a valve seat surrounding the opening in the inverted cup and extending upwardly therefrom, a diaphragmsupported valve normally in engagement with said last-mentioned valve seat, said nozzle pro- BEST AVAILABLE COPY vided with one or more passageways extending from the passage to the pilot valve.

9. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a casing having a passage therethrough provided with a valve and valve seat, a discharge tube communicating with one end of the passage, an inverted open-ended cup spaced slightly above the valve seat to provide a Venturi effect to maintain the valve open by the vacuum produced by the Venturi once the valve is opened, a valve seat on the upper side of the inverted cup, a reciprocably mounted pilot valve above the cup, means for biasing the pilot valve onto its seat, said nozzle provided with passageways for conducting liquid around the pilot valve, whereby the pilot valve is opened by hydrodynamic pressure when the outer end of the discharge tube becomes submerged.

19. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a body portion, a discharge tube communicating with the interior thereof, a valve for controlling the flow of liquid through the nozzle, vacuum means for maintaining the valve in open position, a second valve for controlling said vacuum, and a sensing tube having one end positioned adjacent the outer end of the discharge tube and the other end operatively associated with the second valve.

11. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a body portion, a discharge tube communicating with the interior theroef, a valve for controlling the flow of liquid through the nozzle, vacuum means for maintaining the valve in open position, a diaphragm-operated valve for controlling said vacuum, and a sensing tube having one end positioned adjacent the outer end of the discharge tube and the other end operatively associated with the diaphragm.

12. An automatic filling nozzle comprising a body portion, a discharge tube communicating with the interior thereof, a valve for controlling the flow of liquid through the nozzle, vacuum means acting directly upon the valve for maintaining it in open position, a sensing tube having one end positioned adjacent the outer end of the discharge tube, and means operated by pressure created in the sensing tube for breaking the vacuum.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,725,826 Payne Aug. 27, 1929 2,111,851 Flinchbaugh Mar. 22, 1938 2,528,697 Logan Nov. 7, 1950 2,528,747 Gravelle Nov. 7, 1950 2,547,690 Chadil et al. Apr. 3, 1951 2,595,166 Rhodes Apr. 29, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1725826 *Jan 8, 1926Aug 27, 1929Amos O PayneFiller spout
US2111851 *Sep 16, 1936Mar 22, 1938Henry K FlinchbaughAutomatic filling nozzle
US2528697 *Apr 8, 1948Nov 7, 1950Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoHose nozzle of the automatic shutoff type
US2528747 *Jun 30, 1948Nov 7, 1950Gravelle Clarence PaulAutomatic filling nozzle
US2547690 *Jun 15, 1948Apr 3, 1951Donald E Waggoner JrSelf-closing filling nozzle
US2595166 *Jan 6, 1951Apr 29, 1952Oliver F RhodesLiquid level controlled filling spout
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2805690 *Jun 23, 1954Sep 10, 1957S A T A M Sa Appareillages MecFilling device with automatic flow arresting means
US2811180 *Jun 23, 1955Oct 29, 1957Stoppani A GAutomatic closure means for tank filling line
US2818889 *Jan 26, 1956Jan 7, 1958Phillips Petroleum CoSafety cutoff filler nozzle
US2821212 *Oct 3, 1955Jan 28, 1958Controls Co Of AmericaAutomatic shut-off fueling nozzle
US2869593 *Sep 19, 1955Jan 20, 1959Clifford V ZiegAutomatic shut-off valve
US2903025 *Apr 3, 1957Sep 8, 1959Liquid Controls CorpLiquid flow control apparatus
US3003526 *Mar 2, 1959Oct 10, 1961Jr Louie Austin BellAutomatic dispensing nozzle
US3033246 *Sep 1, 1959May 8, 1962Texaco IncSafety device for holding control valve in open position during filling operation
US3042083 *Oct 30, 1959Jul 3, 1962Tokheim CorpAutomatic nozzle
US3276486 *Mar 29, 1963Oct 4, 1966Edward J SlatteryStandard automatic shut-off fuel servicing nozzle
US3603359 *Oct 17, 1968Sep 7, 1971Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoAutomatic trip safety fill nozzle
US3653415 *Dec 4, 1969Apr 4, 1972Dover CorpAutomatic shut-off dispensing nozzle
US4286635 *Sep 20, 1979Sep 1, 1981Dover CorporationAutomatic shut-off nozzle having an arrangement for controlling when automatic shut off occurs in response to pressure in a sealed tank
US5067533 *Mar 18, 1991Nov 26, 1991Carder Sr Mervin LCast nozzle having improved latch and shut-off mechanism
US6851628Oct 10, 2003Feb 8, 2005Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Nozzle for dispensing liquid in a container
US6854491 *Oct 24, 2003Feb 15, 2005Knubox TechnologiesLow surface energy fuel nozzle
US6951229Oct 10, 2003Oct 4, 2005Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Nozzle including first and second lever portions
US7134580Oct 10, 2003Nov 14, 2006Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Spout assembly for dispensing liquid from a nozzle
US7234614Dec 11, 2003Jun 26, 2007Paul Allan KnightFuel dispensing spout with continuous endface
US8028727 *May 19, 2006Oct 4, 2011Erwin WehActuating device for a rapid coupling
US8033305 *Nov 19, 2004Oct 11, 2011Erwin WehActuating device for a rapid coupling
US8061394 *Jul 14, 2005Nov 22, 2011Erwin WehLocking device for a quick-action connection coupling
DE1197776B *Jan 8, 1959Jul 29, 1965Tokheim International A GZapfpistole
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/207, 91/52, 141/225
International ClassificationB67D7/42, B67D7/48
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/48
European ClassificationB67D7/48