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Publication numberUS2687226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1954
Filing dateApr 26, 1952
Priority dateApr 26, 1952
Publication numberUS 2687226 A, US 2687226A, US-A-2687226, US2687226 A, US2687226A
InventorsJack N Garrett
Original AssigneeJack N Garrett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lift truck attachment for handling hollow bodies
US 2687226 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. N. GARRETT Aug. 24, 1954 2,687,226

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT FOR HANDLING HOLLOW BODIES 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 26, 1952 J K IV. GARRETT INVENTOR.

A TTORNEY A 4, 1 54 J- N. GARRETT 2,687,226

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT FOR HANDLING HOLLOW BODIES Filed April 26, 1952 '3 Sheets-Sheet 2 JACK N GARRETT IN V EN TOR.

Aug. 24, 1954 J- N. GARRETT 2,687,226

LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT FOR HANDLING HOLLOW BODIES Filed April 26, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 SELECTOR INVEN TOR.

A T TORNE Y Patented Aug. 24. 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE LIFT TRUCK ATTACHMENT FOR HANDLING HOLLOW BODIES Jack N. Garrett, Waco, Tex.

Application April 26, 1952, Serial No. 284,596

13 Claims. 1

This invention relates to article handling apparatus and more particularly to an attachment for lift trucks by means of which a plurality of tires or similar article may be picked up and transported from one place to another.

Vehicle tires, coils of wire, or other articles of similar configurations are usually stacked vertically one upon another. The tires are heavy, especially those used on airplanes and trucks, and therefore the effort and time are expended in stacking and moving the tires. It is desirable therefore that a device be provided for lifting and transporting stacks of tires. The device must not employ hooks, spikes, blades or other pointed or sharp implements which may damage the tires. The device also must be of simple construction and be easily operable in order to be of utmost value.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a new and improved device for lifting and transporting tires or the like.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved attachment for lift trucks by means of which tires or the like may be lifted or transported.

It is still another object of the invention to provide anew and improved device for lifting and transporting tires or the like which employs no sharp or pointed implements which might damage the tires.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a new and improved attachment for lift trucks by means of which tires or the like may be lifted and transported and which employs no sharp or pointed implements which may damage the tires.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings and its scope will be pointed out in the appended claims.

- In the drawings,

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a lift truck provided with the attachment for lifting tires showing the telescoping legs in fully extended position;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary side view of the attachment showing the legs in fully telescoped position and with some parts removed;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the attachment, with some parts shown in section;

. Figure 4 is a sectional view taken on the line 44 of Figure 1;

Figure 5 isa sectional view taken on the line 6-5 of Figure 3; and,

Figure 6 is a schematic diagram of the hydraulic system of the attachment.

Referring now to the drawings, the numeral Ill designates a conventional industrial lift truck having a conventional lift rack H and an extension member I 2 slidably mounted thereon and actuated for raising and lowering by a hydraulic ram l3. Extension member 12 has slidably secured to it a vertically slidable bracket I l. The bracket I4 is connected to the lift rack by chains, not shown, which extend over sprockets (not shown) mounted on the extension member l2 so that the bracket I 4 rises on the extension member I 2 as the latter rises on the lift rack I I under the force exerted by the hydraulic ram which is powered from a pump driven by the motor of the lift truck. This construction of the lift truck is conventional and will not, therefore, be described further.

The attachment l5 for lifting tires or the like comprises a pair of vertical tubular supporting members l6 and I! which are welded at their lower ends to the bracket M of the lift truck and are connected together adjacent their upper ends by a cross-member [8 also welded to the vertical supporting member. The vertical supporting members l6 and 11 have horizontal extensions l9 and 20, respectively, which telescope in sleeves 2| and 22, respectively, welded to brackets 23 and 24, respectively. The sleeve 22 and bracket 24 are not shown in Figure 2. The brackets V233 and 24 are rigidly secured to a circular suspension plate 25. Bearings 26 and 21 are rigidly secured to the sleeves 2i and 22, respectively, and the horizontal extensions slide therein. Bearings 28 and 29 are secured to the outer ends of the horizontal extensions l9 and 20, respectively, and slide in the sleeves 2| and 22. The bearings 26 to 29 assure easy sliding movement of the sleeves on the horizontal extensions.

The horizontal extension ram 30 has its cylinder 30b connected to the cross-member [8 by a bolt 3| while its piston rod 32 is secured by a nut 33 threaded on the end of the piston to a bracket 34 welded to the suspension plate. Hydraulic fluid may be admitted or expelled from either end of the cylinder 30b through the conduits 35 and 36. It will be apparent that if hydraulic fluid under pressure is delivered to the cylinder 30b on one side of piston 31 through the conduit 36 and fluid on the other side of the piston is allowed to escape through the conduit 35, the piston will move outwardly causing the circular suspension plate 25 to move outwardly on the horizontal extensions l9 and 2|]. If the flow of fluid in the conduits 36 and 35 is reversed, the suspension plate will be moved inwardly on the horizontal extensions. The horizontal extension ram may be employed, therefore, to control the position of the suspension plate relative to the vertical supporting members It and H.

The circular suspension plate is provided with a plurality of radial slots 38 through which depend the lugs 39 of the mounting blocks 40 slidably mounted on the suspension plate. A tubular leg M is pivotally suspended from each lug 39 by means of a pin 42 which extends through registering apertures in the lug 39 and the pair of ealrs 43 provided on the upper end of each leg 4 The mounting blocks 40 are provided with horizontal recesses 44 into which extend the outer ends of links 35. The links are pivotally connected to the mounting blocks by bolts #36 which extend through the recesses 44 and suitable apertures in the outer ends of the links 45 into threaded bores in the mounting blocks. The inner ends of the links 45 are pivotally connected to an oscillating plate 4'] by bolts 48 which extend through suitable apertures in the inner ends of the links into threaded aperturesin the oscillating plate.

The oscillating plate 41 is provided with a flange 48 which rests on an annular flange 49 welded to the circular suspension plate. A bushing 50 extends upwardly through the annular flange 48 of the oscillating plate so that the oscillating plate may rotate about the bushing.

The oscillating plate is rotated back and forth by ahorizontal expansion ram 5i whose cylinder 52 is pivotally connected to the circular suspension plate 25" by a bolt 53 and whose piston rod 54 ispivotally'connected to the oscillating plate 41 by means of a stud 55 upstanding from the oscillating plate about which is secured the conventional coupling 56 on the end of the piston rod. Conduits 5'! and 5B deliver and withdraw hydraulic fluid from opposite ends of the cylinder 52 on opposite sides of the piston 59 and thus reciprocate the piston and cause the plate H to oscillate.

Slidably extending into each leg 4| is a telescoping leg 69 which is operated by the piston rod 61 of a vertical expansion ram 62. The piston rod isprovided with four pairs of lugs 63-to and between each pair of which is. pivotally securedzby means of a pin 64 the inner end of a link 65.. The outer end of each link 65 is pivotally secured. to a pair of lugs 66, by means of a pin 61. It will be apparent that. asv the piston rod moves downwardly out of the cylinder 68, the telescoping legs are first moved downwardly and then outwardly, the legs 4t pivoting about the pins 42 as required.

Hydraulic fluid is admitted and expelled from the cylinder. 68 from opposite sides of the piston 1aby; means ofconduits and BI. The cylinder 58 is connected at its upper end to the underside of the suspension plate by bolts 82 which extend upwardly through suitable holes in a flange 83 of the cylinder 58 into threaded bores in the suspension plate. The suspension plate is provided with a central aperture 84 through which passes a section of the conduit 80 and an aperture 85 through which passes the conduit 81. It will be apparent that at least certain sections of the conduit are in the form of a flexible hose.

The conduits 58, 80 and 35 are connected to a conduit 86 while the conduits 51, 3B and 8t are connected to a conduit 81. The two main conduits 86 and 8-? are connected to a selector valve 88 which is: adjustable to connect either of the main conduits to the pressure tank 89 through the conduit 90 and at the same time connect the other of the main conduits to a reservoir tank 9| through a conduit 92. A pump 93 driven by the truck lift motor is employed to move hydraulic fluid from the reservoir tank into the pressure tank.

It will be apparent that hydraulic fluid under pressure is admitted simultaneously into all three cylinders 30!), 52 and 68 when the valve 88 is adiusted to permit hydraulic fluid to flow from the pressure tank 89 into either of the main conduits. The dimensions of the various cylinders and pistons and the loads imposed on the rams are such, however, that the vertical expansion ram 62 will first operate, then the horizontal expansion ram 52 and finally the horizontal extension ram 39.

The various elements of the attachment are in the positions shown in Figure 2 when. in. inoperate positions with the suspension plate 251 remote from the vertical supporting members 16: and N; If it is desired now to lift a stack of tires, the vertically slidable bracket 14. of the lift truck is raised until. the telescoping legs 60: clear thet'opmost tire and then the lift truck is maneuvered until the suspension plate 25 is directly over the stack of tires. The bracket i4 is then lowered so the legs 4! enter into the central opening of the stack of tires. withlthe suspension plate abutiting the uppermost tire unless the stackis not very high. The selector valve is then adjusted to connect the main conduit 86 to the. pressure tank 59 and the main conduit 81 to the reservoir tank 9 I. The hydraulic fluid will first cause the piston 68 of the vertical expansion ram 62' to move downwardly since due to its dimensions and the size of the load impressed upon it, the piston 68 is movable by a smaller hydraulic pressure than either of the other pistons.

The piston rod SI of thepiston 68 slides downwardly until the telescoping legs 60 are fully extended from the legs 41. Further downward movement of the piston rod then expands the legs 4! and 60, the links 65 pivoting, at either end. The legs 60 expand until they contact the inner surfaces or central walls of the tires. When these legsv 60 bear with proper force against the central walls of the tires, the pressure in the conduit 86 reaches a value great enoughto. causethe piston rod 53 to slide into its cylinder 52. This causes the oscillating plate 4''! to rotate clockwise, Figure 3, and thus causes the mounting blocks 4!! to slide outwardly on the suspension plate. The upper ends of the legs 40" are" thus moved outwardly or expanded until they toocontact the central walls of the tires and bear against them with proper force.

The pressure in the main conduit 85 will now. increase, if the selector valve is not readjusted, to a value which will cause the piston rod. 32'. to slide into the cylinder 3%. This will move; the suspension plate, and therefore. the stackoftires closer to the vertical supporting members t6.- and IT and to the lift truck. It. is desirable to, have. the tires close to the lift truck to prevent any tendency of the truck to tilt forward under heavy load and also to allow the truck to maneuver more easily in confined areas than would be pos-' sible if the stack of tires were held far away from the truck. It is not necessary, of course, to bring the stack of tires close to the truck. The selector valve may be adjusted to prevent fluid from entering or leaving either main conduit after the upper ends'of the legs M are expanded The bracket I4 may now be lifted to raise the" will thereafter rest.

:atta'chment and :the stack of tires held thereby.

The truck can then move from. one place to spikes or blades or other implements. having relatively sharp points or edges contactthe tires.

'When the tires are transported to :a desired location, thembracketil lz is lowereduntil the lowermost tire contacts the surface on which it The selector valve 88 is adjusted to connect main .conduit 81 to the pressure tank 89 and the main conduit'86 to'the reservoir tank 9|. The-three ramswill nowoperate in the reverse order.. The piston rod 6| .will move upwardly to contact the telescopedlegs and then to'telescope them fully into the .legs 4|. Then the piston rods53 will slide out to rotate the oscillating plate 41 ina counter-clockwise direction,

Figure 3, to contact the upper ends of the legs 4|. Finally, the piston rod 32 may be made to slide out, if desired to move'the suspension plate 25 away from the lift truck. This may be done either before or after the bracket 4| is raised to lift the legs 4| andfiil from within :the stack of tires. .7

It will be apparent now that an attachment for lift trucks has been provided which is controllable by a single valve 88 which may be located on the truck within easyreach of the operator thereof. It will also be apparent that the legs 4| and 60 hold and lift tires by frictionally engaging each tire of a stack of .tires and that no sharp points or edges ever bear against the tires or are. likely to do so. Moreover, it will be seen that the attachment is of. relatively simple structure and easily operable to lift, stack and transport tires or thelike.

Manifestly, theconstruction as shown and described is capable of some modification and such modification as may be construed to fall within the scope and meaning of the appended claims is also considered to. be within-the. spirit and intent of the invention. r,

What is claimed is: i

1. An automobile tire lifting and hauling attachment for a power lift truck having a vertically movable member, said attachment comprising a ,pair of vertical supporting members rigidly secured to said vertically movable member adjacent the lower ends thereof; a substantially horizontal suspension plate connected to the upper ends of said vertical supporting members and havingradial slots therein, a mounting block having a lugslidable in each of said slots, a depending leg pivotallysuspendcd from each of said lugs, each of said dependent legs having a telescopically related extensible section, means supported on saidsuspension plate for moving said blocks to radially actuate said legs and means mounted on said suspension plate and connected to said extensible sections for displacing said sections downwardly and then outwardly. 2. An automobile tire lifting and transporting attachment for a power lift truck having a vertically movable member, said attachment comprising a pair of vertical supporting membersrigidly secured to said vertically movable member adjacent thelower'ends thereof horizontal extensible members joined at thei r'inner ends to the upper ends of said vertical supporting members; a substantially horizontal and radially slotted susp n P at aine by. the. en r ends o sa horizontal extensible members, a mountingblock having a lug slidable in each of the slots :of'said suspension plate; a plurality of spaced legs pivotally suspended from said lugs, eachof said dependent legs having a downwardly extensible section; means mounted on said suspension plate and connected to said extensible sections for extending said sections downwardly and then outw'ardly; and means on said: suspension plate for actuating said blocks to move said legs out- 'wardly on-said suspension plate. I

3. The device of claim 1, said suspension plate being mounted on said supporting members for reciprocal horizontal movement toward and-away from said supporting members; .and' means mounted onsaid supporting members and connected tosaid suspension plate for moving said suspension plate toward and away from said supporting members. a 4. The device of'claim 2, said suspension plate being mounted on said horizontal extensible members for reciprocal horizontal movement toward and away from said supporting members; and means mounted on said supporting members and connected to said suspension plate for moving said suspension plate toward and away from said supporting members.

5. An automobile tire lifting and transporting attachment for a power lift truck having a vertically movable member, said attachment comprising vertical supporting members rigidly mounted on said vertically movable members, horizontally extendable members mounted on the upper ends of i said vertical supporting members a horizontal radially slotted suspension plate mounted on said horizontally extendable members; mounting blocks movable in the slots of said plate, a plurality of dependent legs having upper ends'pivotally connected to said blocks for inward and outward movement away from and toward the periphery of said suspension plate; means selectively moving said blocks, each of said legs having a downwardly extensible sectionj means mounted on said suspension plate and connected to said extensible leg sections for moving said sections downwardly and then outwardly whereby said legs and sections may contact inner surfaces of annular articles to ho-ldsaid annular articles by frictional engagement therewith.

6. An attachment for a power lift truck having a vertically movable member for usein'lifting stacks of annular articles, said attachment comprising a suspension member mounted on said vertically movable member; and having radial slots therein, a block having a lug depending through each of said slots, a plurality of dependent legs pivotally connected at their upper ends to said lugs, means supported on said suspension member for moving said blocks in said slots to actuate said legs inwardly and outwardly relative to the outer edges of said suspension member, a longitudinally movable extension telescopically arranged in each of said legs; means mounted on said suspension member and connected to said extensions for moving said extensions downwardly and then outwardly whereby said legs and sections may be disposed in a stack ofannular articles and then expanded in coordination with a vertically movable member for use in lifting stacks of annular articles comprising a horizontal suspension. member mmmted; om said. vertically movable member; a". plurality-of. mounting. membGIS-i arranged for radialmovcment toward: and away" from: the edges of said suspensiommember 'alleg'pivotally connected at. its upper endrto'each or. said mounting members, each of. said; legs having: a: longitudinally movable extension: a

hydraulic ram mounted om said; suspension members and having: avertically reciprooable member depending. downwardly and betweenasaiddegs; a plurality of radiallyaextendinglinkslhaving inner ends pivotally connected: to said reciprocable membenthe outerends of said linkssbeing pivotally: connectedtd saidextensionssaid extensions being moved downwardly and: their outwardly when. said. reciprocable member is moved: downwardly; said; extensions being moved inwardly and thenzupwardly when. said reciprocablemembet is moved upwardly.

8; The device of claim 6,.said1suspensiom member: being mounted for reciprocable: horizontal movement on: said vertically. movable member; and'hydrauli'c means for reciprocating. saidsuspension; member.

suspensionmember for-radial movementin relation. to the center: of said suspension member, means for actuating said blocks;v a: lurality of dependent spaced legs each being pivotally suspended at itsupper endiromrone of saidlblocks, eachof said legs having a longitudinally movable extension; a cylinder depending from: the: center of saidsuspension member having a plunger,.a series of radial links pivoted at their innerrends to said plungerandat their outer ends to said extensions: for moving said extensions downwardly and: then outwardly in coordinationwith said block. actuating, means, whereby said legs and sections may be disposed in a stack of annular articlesandthen expanded at theirupper and lower: ends to contact the: inner: surfaces: of: said automobile tires in: parallelism to hold: said tires by frictional engagementtherewith,

ll. A device. for liftingstacks of annular articles comprisinga supporting member; a plurality oirmounting, blocks carried by saidsuppor-ting member, arranged for radial displacement-1 thereon, means fortactuating said blocks; a leg; pivotally suspended from each'oisaid blocks, eachof saidzlegs having a longitudinally. movable extension; ahydraulic ram mounted on saidsupporting, member and. havinga vertically reciprocable member depending downwardly and between said legs; a plurality of radially extending links having inner ends pivotally connected to said reciprocablemember, theouterendsof. said links being. pivotally connected-to said extensions, said extensions being. moved downwardly and." then outwardly by said links when. said reciprocable member is moved downwardly, said. extensions being moved inwardly and. thenupwardly when said. reciprocable member is moved upwardly, saidlegs and extensions being insertable in: a stack of annular articles and moved inanloutwardly direction at; their upperand lower ends by saidblock actuating means and sa-id reciprocable member respectively tohold said articles by parallel frictional engagement witlrthe inner walls thereof.

12.. A dense; for' lifting stacks: of annular articles: comprising: a-suspension plate; a plurality of legs having' upper endsrpivotally and slidably connected to saidsuspension plate. for inward: and outward; movement 1 away from and: toward the periphery of said suspension. plate; a first hydraulic means for moving: said: upper ends toward: andsv away fromltheiperiphery of said: suspension plate,-.each of: saidlegs. having a downwardl'y extensible: section; a second. hydraulic means mounted on said. suspension plate. and having: a vertically reciprocable member connectedsto. said. extensions, said extensions being moved downwardly andv then outwardly when said reciprocable' member is: moved downwardly, said extensions being" moved inwardly and: then upwardly: when-said reciprocable member is moved upwardly,. said legsand extensions being insertable; inra stack of annular articles to'hold saidarticles-byxfrictionat engagement therewith, and means-for applying hydraulic fluid to said first and second hydraulic means," said second hydraulic means being'a'ctuated beforesaidfirst hydraulic means. is actuated.

13. A device for lifting stacks of annular articles comprising a suspension. plate; a plurality of legs having uppe ends pivotally. and slidably connected to said suspension plate for inward and. outwardmovement away from and toward the=periphery of said suspension plate; a firsthydraulic means for moving said upper. ends toward: and away from the periphery of said suspensionplate; each oixsaidlegs having a downwardly extensible section; a second hydraulic means mounted. on said suspension plate: and having: a vertically reciprocable member connected to said extensionssaid extensions being moved downwardly and then. outwardly when said reciprocable member. ismove'd' downwardly, said extensions: being" moved. inwardly and then upwardly when said reciprocable: member is moved upwardly,zsaid legs: and: extensions being insertable in a stack of amiular'articles tohold said articles by frictional engagementrtherewith, said suspension plate being movablyv mounted on a; support forhorizontal reciprocable movement; a' third hydraulic means'for. reciprocably moving saidsuspension. plate, andmeans for supplying hydraulic fluid. to said: first, second and third hydraulic means; said. second hydraulic means always being actuatedlbefore-said first hydraulic means is actuated, said first hydraulic means always being-actuatedbefore said third hydraulic means is actuated, said support being attachable to--:kvertically movable member of a power lift tru References Gited in the file of this patent UNITED' STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 306,263 lied-hay. Oct. '7, 1884 478,024 Rose June 28, 1892 513,658 Smith et a1. Jan. 30', 1894 2,050,821 Vercoe ..Aug. 11', 1936 2,122,992 Pride July 5,.19'38 2,206,121 Pierce July 2, 1940 2349,689- Aldiich May 23, 1944 2-,478' '094 Gelbm'an Aug. 2, 1949 2,583,498 Sorbel Jan. 22, 1952 2598, 730 Thompsonet a1. June's"; 1952 2,613,983 Knudsen Oct. 14, 1952 256145711 Houser Oct. 21, 1952 22655-278 Daniels- Oct; 1'3, 1953

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2841300 *Mar 5, 1956Jul 1, 1958Clark Equipment CoMethod of and means for handling coils of wire
US2841301 *Mar 6, 1956Jul 1, 1958Clark Equipment CoCoil handling device
US2893581 *Oct 31, 1957Jul 7, 1959Walton W CushmanSuction lift means for industrial lift trucks
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Classifications
U.S. Classification414/607, 414/908, 294/97
International ClassificationB66F9/18
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/185, Y10S414/121
European ClassificationB66F9/18G