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Publication numberUS2687578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1954
Filing dateNov 10, 1951
Priority dateNov 10, 1951
Publication numberUS 2687578 A, US 2687578A, US-A-2687578, US2687578 A, US2687578A
InventorsRichterkessing Frank H
Original AssigneeW M Cissell Mfg Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for drying fabrics
US 2687578 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 31, 1954' F. H. RICHTERKESSING APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRICS 1, Filed NOV. 10, 1951 Fly].

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Aug. 31, 1954 F. H. RICHTERKESSING APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRICS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 10, 1951 my a.

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ug- 31, 1954 F. H. RICHTERKESSING 2,687,578

APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRICS Filed Nov. 10, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Fly. 10.

' .5. F19 IN V EN T 0R.

Frank H R/c/z ferk essi/ y Patented Aug. 31, 1954 APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRICS Frank H. Richterkessing, Louisville, :Ky., assignor 'facturing Company, I

Ky a corporation of- Kc ApplicationNovember 10, 1951, Serial No. 255,790

11 Claims. 1

This invention relates to-drying apparatus employing aplurality of perforated drums into which damp articles, such as apparel are placed for dryingin response'to the forced circulation of 'hot and/'or'cold air through the drums while'the said drums are rotating.

One object of my invention is to provide a drying apparatus-having a plurality of rotating perforated drums,'a single heaterin'the air inlet,'a single'exhaust means, and suitable partitions for dividing and directing the air stream flowing'between the air inlet and the exhaust means, so that each-drum has an independent stream of air flowing therethrough.

Another object of myinvention isto providea single lint trap for removing the lint collected in the independent streams of air-circulatedby the single exhaust means.

Another object of my invention is to construct and arrange the partitions so as to provide a relatively free and uninterrupted flow of air, and to 'eliminate flat horizontal surfaces which may accumulate lint and-impair the performance of the apparatus.

Another object of my invention'isto construct and arrange the partitions so as to direct each independent air stream diagonally downwardly through its respective drum.

Another object of my invention is to construct and arrange the apparatus sothat the single-heating deviceisa separable-integral unit'so that it maybe lifted fromthe top of the machine to permit difierent types of heaters to be interchangeably substituted one for the other without requiring alterations in the basic unit including the casing, rotating drums, driving mechanisms, lint trap, exhaust means andelectrical controls.

Another object of my invention is to construct and arrange the casing so that complete access to the rotating drums, etc., may be easily -obtained by-removing individual panels-forming the front'of the casing.

Another object of my invention is to provide electric controls that assure safe performance under various conditions of operation.

The advantages of these and other objects will be made manifest as thefollowing description'is read in connection with the: accompanyingdrawings in which;

Figure 1 is a front elevational viewaofea drying apparatus embodying the invention;

.Figure .2 is a .side elevational view of Figure .1 with parts broken away and parts shown in section;

Figure 3 is a front elevational view of theap- J efi'erson County, near to W. M. Gissell Manuncorporated, Louisville, ntucky paratus 'illustrated'in Figures 1 and 2,with the front panels removed, andcertain partsbroken away with parts'shownin section; to show the construction and relation of theair dividing and ai'rdirecting partitions-Withrespect to-the single heater, rotating-drums, single lint'trap and single exhaust means;

Figure 4 is aschematic drawing illustrating-the manner in whichthe partitions divideanddirect the air to provide independent streams of air-for each rotating drum from a single heaterian'd a single exhaust means;

Figure 5 is a rear elevational view of Figure 1;

Figure 6-is *a'front elevational-viewof an integral s'team heatingun'it thatmay besubstituted for the integral gas heating unit illustrated in connection with'Figures l, 2, 3, 4 and 5. A-portion of the cabinet upon which the steam heating unit rests is indicated'in dot-dash lines.

Figure? is a sectional View taken along lines 7-1 of Figure 9;

Figure 8 is a side elevational view of Figure 6;

Figure'g is aplan view of Figure 6; and

Figure 10 is the electrical circuit diagramshowing-the electrical connections of thevarious motors and control switches.

:Before explaining in detail the present'invention, it is to be understood that'the'invention is not limited-in its application tothe specific details of construction and specific arrangement of parts illustratedin the accompanying drawings, other than by the scope of the appended claims, asthe inventionis capable of other embodiments 'andof'being practiced-or 'carried out-in various ways. L'ikewisa'it is'to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation, and not-intended tolimit the scope of the inventicn claimed herein beyond the requirements of theprior art.

Heretofore in the operation of multiple-drum drying tumblers having a single heating device and a single exhaust means,-the hot, dry-air from the heating-device Was-first moved through one drum, and then through another drum, and then tome-exhaust means. This operation produced manyundesirable' effects such as, unequal drying timesfor the twodrumsunder otherwise identical'conditions, heavy lint'depo'sition on the articles 'in the second drum carried 'theretobytheair flowing from the first drum, andthe unwanted introduction of cold air into the seconcLdrum when the door providing access .tothefirst drum was-opened.

'fIhe unequal drying times for the .two .drums was the result of passing hot, dry air into the first drum, which immediately collected moisture from the damp apparel therein, thereby causing a considerable drop in the temperature of the air. The passing of this damp and cooler air into the second drum, in effect, withheld appreciable drying of the apparel in the second drum until the articles in the first drum were substantially dry. Thus, instead of simultaneous drying in the two drums, a more or less sequential drying condition was encountered.

As to the undesirable lint condition in the second drum, this was the result of the air moving through the first drum gathering lint from the tumbled apparel therein, and carrying same into the second drum.

As to the undesirable introduction of cool air into the second drum, when the door affording access to the first drum was opened, this was the result of the relative series arrangement of the apparatuses in the following order, heater, first drum, second drum and exhaust fan. Obviously, opening the door affording access to the first drum provided a cold air inlet into the first drum, and thus by-passed the heater providing only cool air for the second drum, as long as the door was open. Opening the door affording access to the second drum did not introduce cool air into the first drum, as this operation effectively by-passed both the heater and the first drum.

Thus, as the operator opens the doors from time to time to inspect the loads, conditions were established which further aggravated the unequal drying times of the first and second drums.

The present invention provides apparatus for eliminating these undesirable conditions, and is so doing has provided a fabric drying tumbler of (1) increased efficiency; (2) greater ease and flexibility of operation with less operator skill; and (3) structural superiority over what has heretofore been practiced in the art.

To understand thoroughly the principles involved in the present invention reference is directed to Figure 4.

In Figure 4 the numeral l designates an upright casing. The numeral 2 designates a heater which is removably mounted on top of the casing I. In this embodiment a gas heater is illustrated, which is more specifically shown in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 5. However, it is to be understood that other forms of heaters, such as that illustrated in Figs. 6, 7, 8 and 9, may be substituted.

Numerals 5 and 6 indicate partitions partially surrounding drum 9, and numerals I and 8 indicate partitions partially surrounding drum The lower end of partition 5 has a cut-off extension 50. connecting the upright side-wall of casing l, while the partitions 6 and l are joined between the two drums to provide a continuous sweepsheet from the single heater to the single lint trap, thereby providing separate chambers for each drum, 9 and It.

The upper end of partition 8 also has a cutoff extension 8a connecting the upright side-wall of casing l, and the sloping extensions 3a and 8b, respectively connecting the upright side-wall of the casing l and the lower end of partition 8, have rails formed on their lower ends to slidably receive the lint trap or drawer 3, and thus provide a smooth entrance into the single lint trap for the independent air streams flowing individually through the rotating drums 9 and H) from the single heater 2.

In this respect it is to be understood that the partitions 5, 6, l and 8, together with extensions 5a, 8a, 8b and 3a, extend from the back wall of 4 th casing I to the plane of the front panels Id, lb forming the front wall of the casing.

It is to be noted that the upper ends of partitions 5 and 6 are positioned to divide and direct the air stream from the heater 2 into two paths, one through the upper drum compartment and the other to the lower drum compartment.

Also note that the lower ends of partitions I and 8 are positioned to direct the two separated air paths from the two drum compartments into the single lint trap, thus re-uniting th divided air-streams after they have passed through their respective drums.

It will be noted that partition sections 5 and 6 together with the front and back walls of housing I constitute a cylindrical casing surrounding drum 9, the parts 5 and 6 bein spaced from each other to provide an inlet opening in the top portion of the cylindrical casing and an outlet opening in the bottom portion thereof. In a like manner partition sections 1 and 8 together with the front and back walls of housing I constitute a cylindrical casing surrounding drum l0 and having an inlet opening in the top portion thereof and an outlet opening in the bottom portion.

The arrows, shown in light lines in Figure 4, indicate the two separate paths for the air flowing from the single heater 2, to the single lint trap 3 and then to the single exhauster 4.

It is to be particularly noted that the partitions 5, 6, 'I and 8 are symmetrically arranged about their respective drums so as to provide a fiow of air diagonally downwardly through each drum across the rotating axis thereof, and so that the air is equally distributed to the two drum 9 and In.

In this respect it is to be noted that the drums rotate counter-clockwise, as indicated by the bold arrows 9b and lilb in Figure 3, so that the longitudina1 ribs of each drum lift and roll the fabric articles substantially over the exhaust opening formed by the pairs of partitions at the lower right-hand side of each drum compartment. This arrangement forces the air to move through the tumbled garments in order to reach the exhaust opening, thus contributing materially to the drying efficiency of the apparatus.

Having thus described the basic arrangement of the elements of my invention, reference is now made to Figures 1, 2, 3 and 5 for a detailed description of one embodiment thereof. It is to be noted that the numerals of Figure 4 are employed in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 5 to indicate identical parts.

In Figures 1, 2, 3 and 5, the numeral 2 designates the gas-fired heating device, and 2a desi nates a perforated door or pane1 which is hinged at the top to provide access to the gas burner from the front of the machine.

Numeral l designates the upright casing having removable front panels la, lb and la.

A door ll, affording access to the upper rotating drum 9, is pivotally mounted upon the panel la by hinge M. A snap-latch l3 retains the door H in closed position, and a heat-resisting, glasspanel l2 permits visual inspection of the garments Within the upper drum 9.

A bracket 16 is conveniently mounted upon the panel la for receiving the open top-end of laundy nets or bags to facilitate transfer of garments to and from the drum 9.

A lever 15 is pivotally mounted upon the hinge l4, and is arranged to open a normally-closed, electrical door-switch 2|, when the door II is. open.

A'.door- II a, afiording; accessto the; lower; rotating: drum; III,iswpivotally mountedv upon the panel; Ibsby, hinge- Ma a; snap. latch I3a; retains; the-door. I I win closed position, and a heat-resisting; glass-panel, Hit-permits visual inspection ot-the garmentswithin;thelowerdrum III.

Albracket Iii-ails; conveniently. mounted upon the: panel- I b -.-for rec'eivingvtheopen top-end of laundry; nets or; bags, to. facilitate transfer of garments to and from thedrum I it Atlever; I512 ispivotally; mounted upon thehinge I w'andis arranged to opena normally-closed, electrical. door-switch 22, when: the door Ila is open.

The. lower removable panel I c encloses. the

chamber. containing the lint trap3 and suctionfand.

The-lint. trap 3-.is constructed of perforated metal; in theshapeof a.drawer, and it will be noted that; the-lint trap. or. drawer. 3 has a solid front panel-Sbcarrying a handle 30, and that the drawer. is-slidably mounted upon railsformed, on.

the lower ends of the cuteoif extensions 30. and 8b.

A bumper: Sd-is mounted upon the removable panel. Io, to guide. the laundry baskets as they are pushed to and from the machine.

In Figure; parts are cut-away and parts are shownin section, so asto show the. longitudinal ribs. Illa in the perforated, drum II], and the perforatedlint trap or drawer 3.

In Figure 3, the three longitudinal ribs 9a of the. upper drum 9,.and the three ribs Illa of the lowerdrum. II), are illustrated as being located.

symmetrically about the. rotating axis of the drum.

Referring now to Figures 2 and 5 the numeral I1 designates. the motor that rotates the upper drum 9 via V.-belt I'la, gear reducer Ill) and drum shaft. We.

The numeral I8 designates the motor that revolves the lower drum I Il'via V-belt IBa, gear reducer I 812 anddrum shaft I80.

Numeral I 9 designates the motor that operates the suction. fan 4, audit is to be noted that the suction fan 4 is provided with a discharge opening lb, which is connected by duct piping to the exterior. of the. building, so as. to discharge the,

humidiair into atmosphere.

Motors I! and I 8 are mounted upon the upright casing- I by suitable. motor plates, while motor I9 is. mounted upon the fan housing plate to, which is, in turn, mountedupon the casing I.

Referring now to Figure 2, it will be noted that the gas.- solenoid valve 23. has a safety, pilotvalve 2.311, which isactuated by a lever 26 pivotally mounted upon a stationary bearing-support 27. In lighting the gas pilot, the operator merely raises the door 2a, manually raises lever 26 and holds a match to the pilot. After a short interval of time, the pilot flame will affect a heat responsive; element associated with the safety, pilot-valve 23aand retain the same actuated. At this. time. the operator can release the lever 26 asathe heat from the pilot flame will hold the control. 23a actuated until the pilot light is extinguished.

The manual gas-valve 28 controls the amount of.g as flowing to the gas burner, and is used by the. operator toshut-ofl the gas, when it is desirable to. operate the apparatus asa .cold tumbler. The solenoid valve 23 automatically controls the gasflow iniresponse. to :the operation of the electricalfparts: shown in' Figure 10;

For convenience;- the door 2c: is. provided: with.

6: a; latch; to. retain: same in; raised. position: while: the operator is lighting the pilot.

In Figure; 10;, the numeral. ZIhdesIgnatesn a manually-operated,v toggleeswitch for; starting, and stopping motor I1. which; rotatesttheupper drum 9.

Numeral 25 designates. a. manuallyroperatedi, toggle-switch forstarting and. stopping;motor I8 which rotates. the. lower drum. I0;

Numeral 2 I designates. a normally-closedadoorswitch, which is, opened byalever; I5-,:. whenitheu upper: door- I I isopen- Numeral 22 designates.a:normally;-closed, ,door:- switch, whioh..is.-:.opened= by lever I-5a,. whenrxtherlower door Ila is open.

The numeral;20:2..designates: annormallyrclosed switch. associated with thethermostat. 20;;showna in Figures 3 and 4, and. these contactsiare-openedr in response to arise intemperature-actuating: the thermostat/2i! via heat responsiveselementifllh located in the air. inlet to. casing I l Thus, with the pilot flame burning and both; doors II-and Ila closed, contacts -2-0a..,.2IIand.-;22 are closed.

When the operator actuates switch 24; acircuitz is completed from BXv through-theupper: con-- tact 24a, wire 29, ,motor I7, wiretfl, door-switch: 2I, wire 3|, door switch 22, .wire 32:1to CX. This; completes the circuit for. motor l'l-causinggtheupper drum 9 to rotate.

A second circuit is completedfrom through. the lower contact 24b, wire. 33-, wire 3T4, motor::I.-- to OX; This completes the circuitforgmoton I9 causing the suction fan to operate.

A third circuit is completed from BX through the lower contact 241), wire 35, solenoid valve 23, wire 36, thermostat contacts 20a, wire 31, door switch 2I, wire 3|, door switch 22, wire 32 to CX.

This completes thecircuit for the solenoid valve 23, causing the main burner of the gasheater to operate. Should the gas heat become too high, the thermostat contacts 20a open and. de-energize the solenoid valve 23, thereby stopping the operation of the main burner of the gas heater until the temperature drops to a predetermined safe value.

When either door II or Ila isopened, the respective door switch 2I or 22 is opened, and the circuits to CX for the solenoid valve 23, andv the motors I1 and I8 are opened, thus stopping, the drums and cutting off the supply of gas to. the main burner until the door is again closed.

Operation of the switch 25 by the operator will start motor I8, energize valve 23, and start the motor I9.similarly to that described for switch 24. Inthis respect it is to be understood that switches 24 and 25 are illustrated in their normally-open or off positions.v

When gas heat is not employed, the thermoestat 2B and solenoid valve 23 are eliminated. Thus, wires 35, 3B and 37 are omitted, but the remaining parts of the circuit are employed when a steam coil heater, such as that illustrated in-Figures 6, 7, 8 and 9 is substituted. To effect the substitution the electric wires 35 and 31 are disconnected, the integral gas unit lifted from the top of the machine, and the integral steam heating unit placed upon the top of the machine and connected to a suitable source of steam via steam connections 4'! and 48.

In Figures 6, 7, 8 and 9, the numeral 52 designates a main housing having an open underside communicating with the open top-of the casing I, and. anopeningAZa communicatingwith a chamber formed between the two steam coils 39 and 40, and the cover 4|.

The main housing 42 has a second opening 42b communicating with atmosphere.

A lever 44 is pivotally mounted upon a stationary bearing 45 carried by the housing 42, and this lever is pivotally attached at 46 to a sliding damper 43, slidably carried by horizontal rails 42c mounted on the end plates of housing 42.

When the lever 44 is moved to the left, as illustrated in Figure 9, the sliding damper 43 is moved to the right, closing the opening 42b and opening the opening 42a. Thus, in this condition, air is drawn into the machine by the suction fan 4 over the steam coils 39 and 40.

When-the lever 44 is moved to the right, as indicated by the dot-dash lines in Figure 9, the sliding damper 43 is moved to the left, closing opening 42a and opening opening 421). Thus, in this condition, cool air is drawn into the machine by suction fan 4 through the opening 42b.

It will be obvious that any degree of heat, between that of atmosphere and the maximum provided by the steam coils, can be effected by moving the sliding damper 43 to any intermediate position, where cool air through the partial opening of opening 42b is mixed with hot air coming through the partially closed opening 42a.

In Figures 6, 8 and 9 the numeral 49 designates a perforated front panel enclosing the front portion of the steam coils.

Having thus described my invention, 1 claim:

1. In a drying apparatus, the combination of a casing having upper and lower perforated drying drums rotatably mounted therein; an air heater communicating with the casing above the top drying drum; an exhaust fan communicating with the casing below the lower drying drum; and a partition between the upper and lower drums having an upper portion extending upwardly at one side of the upper drum and a lower portion extending downwardly at the opposite side of the lower drum to divide the casing vertically into separate compartments for the upper and lower drums and to direct hot air from the heater to the exhaust fan independently for each drum.

2. In a drying apparatus, the combination of a vertically elongated casing having upper and lower perforated drying drums rotatably mounted in the upper and lower sections thereof; an air heater communicating with the casing above the top drying drum; an exhaust fan communicating with the casing below the lower drying drum; and a partition within the casing extending from the top to the bottom thereof and dividing the casing into separate ducts for each drum, and directing hot air from the heater to the exhaust fan independently for each drum.

3. In a drying apparatus, the combination of a casing having upper and lower perforated drying drums rotatably mounted therein; an air heater communicating with the casing above the top drying drum; an exhaust fan communicating with the casing below the lower drying drum; and a curvilinear partition within the casing dividing the casing into two independent ducts extending from the top section of the casing to the bottom section thereof, one duct including the upper drum and the other duct including the lower drum.

4. In a drying apparatus, the combination of a casing having upper and lower perforated drying drums rotatably mounted therein; an air heater communicating with the casing above the top drying drum; an exhaust fan communicating with the casing below the lower drying drum; and a partition within the casing extending from the top section of said casing downwardly along one side of the upper drum, then horizontally between the said drums, and then downwardly along the opposite side of the lower drum to the bottom section of the casing to provide independent air passageways between the heater and exhaust fan for each of the said drums.

5. In a drying apparatus, the combination of a casing; an air heater communicating with the casing at one end thereof; an exhaust fan communicating with the casing at the opposite end thereof; a curvilinear partition within the casing extending substantially between the aforesaid ends of the casing and dividing the casing into two independent compartments; and a perforated drying drum rotatably mounted in each compartment, said partition having a section curved concentrically about one side of one drum and another section curved concentrically about the opposite side of the other drum.

6. In a drying apparatus, the combination of a vertical casing; an air heater communicating with the top portion thereof; an exhaust fan communicating with the bottom portion thereof; a vertical partition extending from the top portion of the casing to the bottom portion thereof, dividing the casing into two independent air ducts; and a perforated drying drum rotatably mounted in each duct, said partition having a section curved concentrically about one side of one drum and another section curved concentrically about the opposite side of the other drum.

'7. In a laundry drying apparatus, a casing comprising back and side walls, a wall member within the casing which together with the casing side walls forms separated conduits, each having an air inlet opening at the top and an air outlet opening at the bottom, upper and lower perforated drums rotatably mounted in said conduits, said wall member passing partially around one side of the upper drum and partially around the opposite side of the lower drum to form an air inlet conduit section for the lower drum and an air outlet conduit section for the upper drum, bafile means extending inwardly from said casing side walls and opposed to said wall member, heating means communicating with both of said air inlets, a common exhaust chamber at the bottom of said casing communicating with both of said air outlets and an exhaust fan communicating with said exhaust chamber.

8. The laundry drying apparatus as defined in claim 7 wherein the vertically extending wall member is generally S-shaped.

9. In a laundry drying apparatus, a casing comprising back and side walls, a wall member within the casing which together with the casing side walls forms separated conduits, each having an air inlet opening at the top and an air outlet opening at the bottom, upper and lower perforated drums rotatably mounted in said conduits, said wall member passing partially around one side of the upper drum and partially around the opposide of the lower drum to form an air inlet conduit section for the lower drum and an air outlet conduit section for the upper drum, baflie means extending inwardly from each side wall of said casing and extending partially around said upper and lower drums, respectively, on opposite sides thereof from said wall member, heating means communicating with both of said air inlets, a common exhaust chamber at the bottom of said casing communicating with both of said air outlets, and an exhaust fan communicating with said exhaust chamber.

10. In a laundry drying apparatus, a housing comprising front, back and side walls, a pair of perforated drums rotatably mounted in the upper and lower sections of said housing respectively, a cylindrical casing surrounding each drum and extending between the front and back walls of said housing, each cylindrical casing being provided with an inlet opening in the top wall portion and an outlet opening in the bottom wall portion thereof, said cylindrical casings being spaced from the side walls of said housing, said housing having an air inlet opening in the top section thereof above the upper drum and an exhaust opening in the lower section thereof below the lower drum, bafile means extending from one side wall of said housing to prevent air from passing around one side of the upper cylindrical casing, bafile means extending from the opposite side wall of said housing to prevent air from passing around the opposite side of the lower cylindrical casing, and baffle means connected between said two cylindrical casings to prevent air from flowing from the outlet of said upper cylindrical easing into the inlet of the lower cylindrical casmg.

11. In a laundry drying apparatus, a casing comprising front, back and side walls and having an air inlet at the top thereof, a partition wall within the casing connecting the front and back walls and dividing the air entering said inlet into two separate streams, a perforated drum rotatably mounted in an upper section of said casing and within one of said air streams, a second perforated drum rotatably mounted in a section of said casing below said first drum and within the other air stream, said partition wall passing downwardly around one side of the upper drum and spaced from the adjacent side wall of the casing to form an air inlet conduit section for the lower drum and then passing laterally between both drums and being spaced from the opposite side wall of said casing to provide an air outlet for the upper drum, baffle means within the casing connecting the front and back walls and extending inwardly from said opposite side wall and spaced from said partition wall to form an air inlet for the upper drum, second bafiie means Within the casing connecting the front and back walls and extending inwardly from said adjacent side wall and spaced from said partition wall to form an air outlet for the lower drum, heating means for heating the air in both air streams, a common exhaust chamber within said casing communicating with both of said air outlets, and an exhaust fan communicating with said exhaust chamber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 934,772 Urgelles Sept. 21,1909 1,017,412 Harris et al Feb. 13, 1912 1,172,575 Wood Feb. 22, 1916 1,351,118 Nichols Aug. 31, 1920 1,533,086 Baker Apr. 14, 1925 2,271,757 Boltz Feb. 3, 1942 2,351,429 Huebsch June 13, 1944

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2712182 *Feb 13, 1953Jul 5, 1955Hoyt Mfg CorpDrying mechanism
US2827276 *Mar 5, 1953Mar 18, 1958Rheem Mfg CoLaundry dryer
US2870545 *May 24, 1955Jan 27, 1959W M Cissell Mfg CompanyFabric drying apparatus having means for selectively supplying drying and cooling medium
US7246451Sep 30, 2004Jul 24, 2007Technophar Equipment & Service LimitedTumbler-dryer for capsules
US7913419 *Dec 30, 2005Mar 29, 2011Whirlpool CorporationNon-tumble clothes dryer
US7921578 *Jul 7, 2006Apr 12, 2011Whirlpool CorporationNebulizer system for a fabric treatment appliance
US7997006 *Oct 31, 2007Aug 16, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry machine and control method thereof
US8069582 *Dec 24, 2008Dec 6, 2011Daewoo Electronics CorporationDryer
US8250885Apr 29, 2009Aug 28, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry machine
US8256136 *Nov 12, 2008Sep 4, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry treating apparatus
US8297082Apr 29, 2009Oct 30, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry machine
US8307567 *Apr 29, 2009Nov 13, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry machine
US8387419Apr 29, 2009Mar 5, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry machine
US8424220Jun 11, 2007Apr 23, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry dryer and method for controlling the same
US8677785Apr 29, 2009Mar 25, 2014Lg Electronics Inc.Laundry machine
US8931186Feb 15, 2007Jan 13, 2015Lg Electronics Inc.Drying machine and method for controlling the same
US9206542Jul 21, 2009Dec 8, 2015Lg Electronics Inc.Drying machine and method for controlling the same
US20060070254 *Sep 30, 2004Apr 6, 2006Herman VictorovTumbler-dryer for capsules
US20080000099 *Jul 17, 2007Jan 3, 2008Technophar Equipment And Service LimitedMethod of manufacturing capsules with a tumbler-dryer
US20090126423 *Nov 12, 2008May 21, 2009Sang Hun BaeLaundry treating apparatus
US20090165323 *Dec 24, 2008Jul 2, 2009Daewoo Electronics CorporationDryer
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/127, 34/87
International ClassificationD06F58/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F58/02
European ClassificationD06F58/02