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Publication numberUS2687717 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1954
Filing dateJun 19, 1952
Priority dateJun 19, 1952
Publication numberUS 2687717 A, US 2687717A, US-A-2687717, US2687717 A, US2687717A
InventorsOwen K Murphy
Original AssigneeOwen K Murphy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cushion type motor operated kinesitherapy device
US 2687717 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Allg 31 1954 0.7K. MURPHY 2,687,717

C'USHION TYPE MOTORYOPERATED KINESITHERAPY DEVI CE Filed June 19, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

EY Y

Arron/fm Aug 31, 1954 o. K. MURPHY 2,687,717

CUSHION TYPE MOTOR OPERATED KINESITHERAPY DEVICE Filed June 19, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 y INVENToR.

MMM BY of Mw ITam/fyi Patented Aug. .31, 1954 CUSHION TYPE M KINESITHER OTOR OPERATED APY DEVICE Owen K. Murphy, Adamsville, Pa. Application June 19, 1952, Serial No. .294,457`

(CI. 12S-33) 7 Claims.

This invention relates to a cushion type motor operated kinesitherapy device and more particularly to a simple and durable device of this character with an applicator having gyratory motion and in the form of a cushion that can be readily used for treatments of the human body.

This application is a. companion to my copending application, Serial No. 294,458, Filed June 19, 1952, for Motor Operated Kinesitherapy Device.

As hereinafter more fully described the present invention is concerned with a cushion type of such device having a motor operated gyrator and which device can be applied to the human body. In such appliances as heretofore made, considerable difficulty has been experienced in providing an instrument which is simple, rugged and highly effective. Because of the gyratory motion, the bearings of the motor are particularly susceptible to destructive action, and `undue wear on these parts leads to failures. In the device embodying the present invention a novel and simple construction is providedfor mounting the entire motor unit as an entity, and with a measure of resiliency or freedom of movement which eliminates the cause of failure and at the same time provides a motion or action having both a pleasing and a therapeutic effect. I

Accordingly one of the objects of the present invention is to provide a cushion type motor operated kinesitherapy device which -will operate without changes in characteristics for a long period of time and which has both a pleasing and therapeutic effect.

Another object which is composed of simple and low cost parts that can readily be put together. v I

Another object is to provide such a device in which the motor is adequately ventilated.

Another object is to provide such a device in which the parts are resiliently held together through the medium of the casing or cover which encloses the cushion.

`Another object is to improve the operating characteristics of the cushion, this being accomplished by providing two counterpart core sections which resiliently clamp between them the motor driven applicator` and which also have resilient pads interposed therebetween so that the two core sections are each other to a limited degree.

Other objectsand` advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and drawings in which:

is to provide such a device movable with respect to Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a therapeutic dev1ce made in the form of a cushion which can be used to support the body of a person or can be placed against any part of the body and which contains a gyratory mechanism or applicator to cause the cushion to impart a mild massaging action to the part of the body in contact with the cushion. I

Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section taken generally on line 2 2, Fig. 1.

Figs. 3 and 4 are slightly enlarged vertical transverse sections taken on the correspondingly numbered lines of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a wiring diagram of the electrical components.

In the form of the invention illustrated the numeral I 0 represents an electrical motor having a generally cylindrical casing II and a motor shaft` I2. the motor` shaft I2, the blades of these fans being shaped to move the air longitudinally through the casing II of the electric motor for the purpose of cooling the same. Each fan includes a hub I4 from which its blades I5 radiate, and screwed into each of the fan hubs I4 is a screw I6 which projects radially and has a head I'I at its outer end. One or more weights I8 `are carried by each of the screws I Ii,` these weights being preferablyof washer-like form and held against the corresponding screw head II by a lock nut I9. The screws I6 are arranged in substantially the same plane and to project in substantially the same direction and it will therefore be seen that these screws I6 and their weights I81are cumulative in providing an eccentric weight on the motor shaft I2 which tends to gyrate the motor shaft and the motor as a function of `its operation.

An important feature of the invention resides in the provision of a pair ofrubber rings 20 surrounding each of the opposite ends of the motor casing II. These rings are preferably cementiciously secured, as indicated at 22, to the motor casing and provide a resilient radial extension of the motor casing thereof.

The motor is contained within a wooden core composed of four corner blocks indicated generally at 25 and two plywood panels 26. These four corner blocks are identical in construction and hence a description of one will be deemed to apply to all four. Each of these wooden corner blocks extends lengthwise of the axis of the electric motor I0 interposed therebetween and has one longitudinal corner 28 rounded to conform to the desired rounding shape of the cushion indi- A fan I3 is mounted on each end of cated generally at 29. The corner of each block opposite its rounding corner 28 is beveled, as indicated at to conform to the rubber rings 20 of the motor IU which these beveled faces engage, as best shown in Fig. 3. At at least one end of each of these beveled corners 30 each block is recessed, as indicated at 3| to provide a housing for a rheostat 32 as hereinafter described in detail and to permitthe ready circulation of air from one endof'the cushioni'to the other end and through the motor.

The plywood panels 26 are preferably set into recesses 33 provided in the corresponding outer face of each of the blocks 25, each ofthese'plywood panels being disposed to bridge the space between a companion pair of the wooden blocks 25 and to form a continuationfofwtheexterior faces of these wooden blocks, as best shown in Figs. 3 and 4. Each of these plywood'l panels 25 also preferably engages the two rubber rings '2U surrounding 'thef motor casing.' I0. At Veach side of the cushion the'blocks-:ZE are 'yieldingly held in spaced relation by, soft` spongeA rubber pads or blocks 35. TheseV sponge rubber pads are compressed between. the' faces 35 of the wooden blocks 25 opposite the wooden panels 26 and preferably four of such' rubber" pads or blocks are provided one at each end of each wooden vcorner block .251..

The assembly as above' described' is surn rounded by a relativelyfthick layerSSf ofkv soft foam rubber, this piece of foamrubberzbeing secured, as by a suitable cementSS, to the external faces of thecorner'blocks25 and plywood panels 2S. The parts of the cushionasabove described are= heldin' compressed and: assembled relation by aA cover 40 which is in the form of an open. ended sleeve or tube of ilegible material, such .as a cloth?, leather or plasticiabric. Thissleeve` exerts ray/'compressive force on the externall Efacefof the'foarn `rubber layerY 38 and thisy in turn1`exerts acompressive force on the severalwcoden cornerblocks 25 and plywood panels 26.4` This compressivefforce is' in turn transmitted to the several=sponge rubber pads i' and is also transmitted'to .lthe rubber'rings Zsurrounding the motorvcasing. Il. it will thereioreI beseen1that thelrmotorl I0 isl heldby its rubber rings l l in'compressed-.relation bythe severalfwooden parts-of the core of thecushion and that the gyratoryfimpulses generated by the eccentricy weights l 8 -`of-lthis rmotor areatransmitted through its casing and through its-rubber rings lto the several parts-of the wooden 'core ofthe cushion; It will -iurtherbe seen that'the two opposite flatterl'sidesf-of 'the cushionare free to move independently,of=.eachrother to the eirtent permitted by the sponge rubber pads The oppositefendsfof'.thef cushion are completed iby' `folding 1 over. theuoppositeends of the tubular outerlcover 4!) land tacking, as by` staples (not shown), .to the vends'vof the four wooden blocks 25 One end of the cushion isifurther enclosed `by.-a metal .platel2 the marginal part of which encases the corresponding .folded over end ofv the tubularcover or casing All.: This metal cover is provided with a plurality of louvers 43 in"register'^withrthe opening deiined tby the end frecesses 3110i" the several corner pieces 25 of the woodenfcore'ofthecushion This end plate is shown asssecured .by six` screws vi4 tov either of those two wooden corner pieces 25 connected by a common plywood panelZB. By connecting the metal .plate 42only to these two corner pieces 25 Vthese two corner pieces 25 are Cil free to move as permitted by the sponge rubber pads 35 relative to the other two corner pieces 25 without interference by the end plate 42.

The end plate il! preferably carries the rheostat 32, the adjusting knob 45 of which is arranged externally of the plate and the resistance wire i6 and rotary slide contact 48 of which are arranged inside of this plate. This end plate can also carry'a manual on and off switch 49 the operating finger piece El! or" which is arranged externally of the plate and the operated mechanism, indicated generally at 5|, of which isarranged on the inside of this end plate. To insure against charring of the faces of the wood surrounding and opposing the resistance wire lli of the rheostat 32, these faces can be protected by a facing 52 of asbestos paper which can be sta-pled or secured in any suitable mann ner. As best illustrated in Fig. 4 the motor lil, on and off switch 139 and rheostat 32 are preferably in. series relationship with the opposite sides of a line brought to the cushion through:

atwo wire cord 53' having the usual plug 54.'

The end of the cushion opposite the platen can be enclosed by a `plate @2a which is identical to the rst plate 42 :except therheostat `:'22 or switch Q9. respects the end plateY end plate d2 andsecuredin the samemann'cr; the same reference numerals havey beencemployed and distinguishedby thesufx the description' is yIlot repeated. It'will 'particu'.- larly be noted, however; that the plate VManhas louvers lila topermit circulation of air length wise of the cushion.

in the operation oft Since in other e form of the invention' shown, the vrotation ci the eccentric weights-:lts on the motor shaft l2`imparts a gyratory move# l ment to this motor shaftas well as to .the-,casing -s This .motion is transmitted.:

li of the motor. through the twoY rubber'ringsZ .around the `motor casing to the four corner bloclsfofy the wooden core ofthe' cushion as plywood panels 26 forming a part of ithis core,`

these wooden parts beingheldl in compressive` relation with` the rubber rings 20:

These wooden members transmit .thisfmoti'oirf throughthesponge rubber layer 3B to the tubular cover lil .and to the part of the bodyagainst the cushion. It will be`noted that the wooden.

core for the cushion.` is .divided into -upper and free to movewith' refe.V erence to each other by reason of the' four.v

lower sections which are sponge rubber blocks or pads 35.

Coolingof` the motor is effectediby air drawn` in by the fans |31 on the motor shaftthrough',r

thelouvers :43 in the end plate l2 ati one end of the cushion'and is. discharged through".I

Say,

the louvers lxof the end plate @2a/at thefopposite end of this cushion, this air traveling..

through the longitudinal open .ended space provided bythe wooden core members and also It Wur'be.

through the casing Il of 'themoton noted that the end plates l2` and 42a. are fas+ tened by screws A4; 44a. only to onersectionior half of the wooden core of the cushionsosithat theseV platesrdo not impede section withlreference to theother. of the motor ing-thel knob lation of the manual-switch 49, both of thesecontrol parts being. mounted onthe end Aplate `42.

Itwillbe noted. that the subjectof the. invene tion includes two generally, counterpart core secthat it does'not carry 42a is identicalto.' the er and@ the movement of one.' Thespeed can readily be adjusted by'. turn--l 450i the rheostat 32 and the moe tor` can also be de-energized through manipu posed under stress between the` stationary part` andthe walls of said channels to `serve asthe sole and iioatingr support `between the motor and core sections whereby rotation of the unbalanced rotary part of the motor will cause a bodily movement of the motor in `a relatively small, closed loop, path which is `transmitted through the cushion ringsto the core sections, and by said core sections through the tube or layer of foam rubber to the tubular casing.

I claim: l

1. A therapeutic device, comprising a pair of generally counterpart rigid core structures, a motor disposed between said core structures in fully spaced relation to the walls thereof, said motor having a relatively stationary part and a rotary part journalled in said stationary part,

said rotary part having a predetermined, mechanical, rotary unbalance of substantial amount well in excess of any accidental unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, soft, resilient cushion elements interposed between said stationary part and said walls of said core sections, a tube of soft, resilient cushion material embracing both of said core sections, and a tubular, flexiblecover compressively embracing said tube and core sections to yieldingly urge said core sections toward each other to maintain said cushion elements under stress, said cushion elements serving as the sole and floating support between said motor and core sections, whereby rotation of said rotary part will cause a gyratory movement of said motor in a relatively small, closed-loop path which is transmitted through said cushion elements to said core sections.

2. A therapeutic device, comprising a pair of generally counterpart rigid core structures, a motor disposed between said core structures in fully spaced relation to the walls thereof, said motor having a relatively stationary part and a rotary part journalled in said stationary part, said rotary part having a predetermined, mechanical, rotary unbalance of substantial amount well in excess of any accidental unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, soft, resilient cushion elements interposed between said stationary part and said Walls of said core sections, a layer of soft, resilient cushion material on the outer face of at least one of said core sections, a tubular open ended flexible cover compressively embracing said layer and core sections to yieldingly urge said core sections toward each other to maintain said cushion elements under stress, said cushion elements serving as the sole and oating support between said motor and core sections, whereby rotation of said rotary part will cause a gyratory movement of said motor in a relatively small, closed-loop path which is transmitted through said cushion elements to said core sections, fastenings securing the ends of said cover to the exposed faces of said core sections, and end plates severally secured to one only of said core sections at said exposed ends of said core sections and extending over said fastenings.

a `motor disposed Within mat-` gyratory of said corner blocks and mating, `opposing `central l channels extending therethrough, 'a Amotor disposed `in said mating i channels in fully spacedrelation `to `the walls of said channels, said motor having a relatively stationary part and a rotary part journalled in said stationary part, said rotary part` having `a predetermined, mechanical, rotary unbalanceoi substantial amount well in excess of any accidental unbalance due to inaccuracy of .manufacture, soft, `resilient cushionele'ments interposed between said stationary part and said walls of said channels, a layer of soft, resilient cushion material` on the outer face `of at least one of said core sections, a tubular open ended flexible covercompressively embracing said layer and core sections and with its open ends exposing the ends lof said core sections from which-said channels extend, said cover yieldingly urging said core sections toward each other ments under stress, said cushion elements serving as the sole and floating support between said motor and core sections, whereby rotation of said rotary part will cause a gyratory movement of said motor in a small, closed-loop path which is transmitted through said cushion elements to said core sections, fastenings securing the ends of said cover to said exposed faces of said core sections, and end plates severally secured to one only of said core sections at said exposed ends of said core sections and extending over said fastenings, said plates being provided with louvers in register with said channels.

4. A therapeutic device, comprising a pair of generally counterpart rigid core structures, an electric motor disposed between said core structures in fully spaced relation to the walls thereof, said motor having a relatively stationary part and a rotary part journalled in said stationary part, said rotary part having a predetermined, mechanical, rotary unbalance of substantial amount well in excess of any accidental unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, soft, resilient cushion elements interposed between said stationary part and said walls of said core sections, means resiliently urging said core sections toward each other to maintain said cushion elements under stress, said cushion elements serving as the sole and floating support between said motor and core sections, whereby rotation of said rotary part will cause a gyratory movement of said motor' in a 'relatively small, closed-loop path which is transmitted through said cushion elements to said core sections, end plates severally secured to one only of said core sections at opposite ends thereof, and a manual switch in series with said motor mounted on one of said end plates.

5. A therapeutic device as set forth in claim 4 wherein a rheostat in series with said motor and said manual switch is mounted on said one of said end plates.

6. A therapeutic device, comprising a pair of generally counterpart rigid core sections having mating, opposing central channels extending therethrough, each of said core sections comprising a pair of wooden corner blocks and a panel set intof opposing corners of said corner blocks to form a continuation of the outer faces to form, with said corner blocks, said mating channels on the opposing sides of said core sections, armotor disposed in said mating channels in fully spaced relation to the walls of said channels, said motor having a relatively stationary part and a rotary part jourto maintain said jcushion elel baaneefo substantial amount wellf iriuexcesa of i anwaoeidentaLiunbalanee zduefztozinaccuracy of manutacturle, soft; resilient ieushon 4elements. -interposed'betweenr said-ifstatiorxary:Yr part tand 1 said walls of? said: channels; and: means.; resiliently urginge saidcoreesectionsntoward.:eaehxother `to maintain sai-dscushozrelements under stress,v said cushiorrtelem'ents fservingf` as :the vsole and v.floating sucnpori:i1beimfeerniisaidfn'mtorf and core sections, whereby;'rotation:ozfsaidiotary:part .will cause a gyratoryvmovementeofsaid: motor 1in a relatively smalLz. closedeloopy,4 path. which p is` transmitted througl-sai'd ioushion; elementsf'to said :core sec-l tions.:`

7: Aftherapeuticdevioe;.comprising 1a pairV of generally.; counterpart z, rigidi. core structures, a motorrdisp'osedloetweerrasadv core structures in motonzhavngarelatively:stationary part and a rotary'wpart :journalled::;irn. saidl stationary part, said rotary? part having a predetermined; mechanical); rotary unbalancef'of substantialv amount of`- 'atvleas'ffone` of said 'core sections, anda' tubular,

flexible covercompressively embracing said-layer: and coresectionstoyieldngly lurge said core seoto'ns towardf'eaoh other to main-tain said cushion lolelements-funder stress; said cushion elemerits` serving Iasrthe f sole andY "floating support between said motor andcore-fsectionswhereby rotationv4 of saidirotary part Will-fcause agyratory moveu mentfof 'Said-motorin amelatively small, closed 152 loop: path which* is f transmitted throughsaidf cushion elements to saidcore sections;

.i Number-.-

Namev Date Tompkins Aug."12,v 1947 Wettlaufer Jan. 30,41951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425655 *Mar 22, 1944Aug 12, 1947Edwin H TompkinsTherapeutic device
US2539712 *Oct 5, 1948Jan 30, 1951Wettlaufer William LVibratory therapeutic cushion
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2786465 *Jul 21, 1955Mar 26, 1957William N MoxleyMassage pillow
US2833276 *Aug 17, 1954May 6, 1958Owen K MurphyMotor operated kinesitherapy device
US2840071 *Nov 25, 1957Jun 24, 1958Mcnair Samuel LElectrical vibrating device in combination with a cushion
US2898907 *Apr 16, 1956Aug 11, 1959Chicago Dynamic Ind IncVibratory apparatus
US2905170 *May 16, 1958Sep 22, 1959Seaman LouisChair-bed with floating vibrator housing
US2943620 *Feb 24, 1958Jul 5, 1960Frank J SibertPillow or cushion type vibrator
US2943621 *Aug 26, 1958Jul 5, 1960Modern Aids IncVibrating pillow
US3140711 *Dec 31, 1962Jul 14, 1964Mcgathey Wendell HarryKinesthetic therapeutic exercising device
US4559929 *May 21, 1984Dec 24, 1985Hyman Products Co., Inc.Massage device
US5551952 *Feb 9, 1995Sep 3, 1996Falgout; Andre+E,Acu E+Ee M.Teething ring
US6647572 *Aug 6, 2002Nov 18, 2003Kwang-Ho LeeCushion having embedded therein vibrating motors
US7402145Jun 9, 2004Jul 22, 2008Woggon Dennis AMethod of neuromusculoskeletal proprioceptive re-education and development of a living body using corrective chair and vibration
US8308675Mar 29, 2007Nov 13, 2012Mcneil-Ppc, Inc.Applicator device
US20080243046 *Mar 29, 2007Oct 2, 2008Melinda CettinaApplicator device
DE1133858B *Mar 6, 1958Jul 26, 1962Owen Kenneth MurphyTherapeutisches Kissen mit einem eine vibrierende Bewegungsenergie uebertragenden Motor
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/57, D24/215, 601/70
International ClassificationA61H1/00, A61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2023/0281, A61H2201/0138