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Publication numberUS2687720 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1954
Filing dateAug 29, 1950
Priority dateAug 29, 1950
Publication numberUS 2687720 A, US 2687720A, US-A-2687720, US2687720 A, US2687720A
InventorsHaboush Edward J
Original AssigneeHaboush Edward J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ambulatory splint and traction device
US 2687720 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Allg. 31, 1954 E. J. HABousH AMBULATORY SPLINT AND TRACTION DEVICE fil@ Aug. 29, 195o 2 Sheets-Sheet l FIGJ'.

INVENTOR.

EDWAR J. HABOUSH BY A @lawful-M H|s ATTORNEYS.

A118'- 31, 1954 E. J. HABousH 2,687,720

AMBULATORY SPLINT AND TRACTION DEVICE Filed Aug; 29, 195o 2 sheets-sheet 2 x MIME!!! Y INVENTor. EDWARD J. HABOUSH HIS ATroRNEYs.

Patented Aug.` 31, 1954 2,687,720 AMBULATORY "SPLINT AND T11/ACTION VICE Edward J. Haboush, Brooklyn, N. Y. Application August 29, 1950, Serial No. 181,969

Claims.

This invention relates to orthopedic devices and it relates particulaly to improvements in ambulatory splints, bone lengthening and fracture reducing devices and splints .for receiving or transferring fractured yor lengthened limbs from fracture reducing ratus.

Heretofore, the traction apparatuses used for reducing fractures or for surgically lengthening limbs have used bone pins to `penetrate and support fractured or separated portions of a bone during the reduction of the fracture or during the bone lengthening operation. Such pins, due to their comparative rigidity, lend themselves to ready transfer to an ambulatory splint. However, the diameter `of such pins requires that holes of substantial diameter must be drilled through the bone sections with the result that healing of thebone requires a substantial period of time after the pins are Withdrawn.

Tensioned wires, such as Kirschner wires, are superior to the `pins to the extent that they may be used with less damage to the bone. However., such wires have not been used when the limbis to be transferred to an ambulatory splint because of the diiiiculty in `maintaining the required high tension on the Wires `during the transfer procedure.

The present invention relates to an improved type of splint which may be used with `fracture reducing `and bone lengthening apparatus utilizing tensioned wires.A The improved splint is. constructed and arranged to receive the y.fractured or lengthened `limb from the apparatus Without loss of tension onthe wires. The new splint can be adjusted and made rigid to serve as an ambulatory splint, and, if desired, it can include adjusting mechanism to render it `useful `as a bone lengthening and fracture reducing apparatus.

More particularly, the apparatus includes a plurality of yoke members each of which is provided with a pair of arcuate wire gripping and tensioning jaws adapted `to receive `a portion of a tensioned wire passing through the fractured or lengthened limb. As the jaws are closed to grip the `already tensioned wire, the portions of the wire within the jaws are bent thereby eX- erting increased tension on the wire and gripping it tightly on opposite sides of the limb .to maintain tension when the wire is released from the fracture reducing or bone lengthening apparatus.

The yoke members -vmay be maintained in spaced relation `by pairs "of rigid rods interposed between `each pair of yoke members; Each end and bone lengthening appaof a rod is :connected to a yoke by means of a pair 4of pivotally connected split sleeves which are slidabl'e on the rod and an arm of the yoke to permit `suitable positioning `of the rod relative to the yoke. The two :split sleeves of each connecting member are `connected by means :of a screw, which, when loosened, permits pivoting movement of the sleeves and sliding movement relative to the .yoke and the rod. When the screws `are tightened, the sleeves are clamped securely to the rod 'and the yoke and are fixed relative to each other. In this Way, each yoke maybe anchored rigidly 'to a pair `or to two pairs of spacing rods `by tightening only one screw for yeach `split sleeve connection. This arrangement for clamping or locking in fixed relation greatly simplifies the `adjustment -of the splint, either when used as a transfer splint or an ambulatory splint.

The yokes preferably are made of rod stock of suitable metal, for stainless steel or the like, of circular' cross-section. By vusing such a circular rod, the split sleeves engaging the yokes can be adjusted lengthwise and angularly around the arms `of the yokes to permit almost universal adjustment ofthe yokes relative to the spacing greatly facilitating the adjustment of the splint.

The `splint `can also :be provided with mechanisrn permitting controlled traction to be ap* plied to `the limb for reducing fractures or lengthening limbs.

For a better understanding of `the present invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan View of a typical splint embodying the present invention, partly broken. away;

Fig. 2 is a view in side elevation of the splint shown partly in section to disclose details thereof;

Fig. 8 is a view `in section taken on line 3-3 of Eig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a view in `section taken on line 4--4 of Fig. l;

Fig. 5 isa view in of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 isa view in of Fig` 2;

The form of splint described hereinafter may be of a type including four yoke members lll, I l, l2 and I3 of graduated sizes although more or fewer -`than four of such yokes may be used, if desired. The yokes Hl to I3 are formed of cirsection taken on line 5-5 section taken on line G-l F cular Arod stock such `as stainless steel rod, aluthe yokes and rods;

example, aluminum alloy,`

rods, thereby i The yokes, as shown their arcuate clamping plate or jaw I4 having an inner concave surface [4a generally complementary to the arcuate surface of the arm of the yoke. The clamping plate or jaw I4 may be adjusted toward the yoke by means of a socket head screw I adapted to be turned by a suitable wrench, such as an Allen wrench, to bring the arcuate plate into tight engagement with the portion of the wire W interposed between the jaw or plate I4 and the yoke arm. Rotation of the jaw I4 around the screw I5 is prevented by means of a guide pin I5a fixed to the arm of the yoke and slidably received in a hole I4b in the jaw I4, as shown in Figure 5. It will be seen by an inspection of Fig.` 1 that if the opposite ends of a wire W are gripped tightly and the wire is subjected to tension, tightening of the screw I5 will cause the wire to bend or ex around the arm of the yoke and will subject the wire to even greater tension because, in eiect, the action of the clamping plate or jaw I4 is to lengthen the wire.

In order to avoid bending the wire too sharply as it passes from beneath the edge of the clamping plate or jaw I4, the inner edges of the jaw may be provided with a series of notches I5 (Fig. 4)

which allow the wire to bend on a more gradual curve. These notches also serve to position the wire against movement axially of the arms of the yoke.

By utilizing the four yokes as shown in Figs. l and 2, four wires may be gripped, two wires pass- :Ing through the bone portion on one side of the fracture or cut and the other two passing through the other bone portion on the other side of the fracture or cut.

To enable the bone portions to be xed relative to each other, the several yokes Il), II, I2 and i3 are maintained in spaced relation by means of pairs of spacing rods I1 and I8 interposed between the yokes Iii and II, rods I9 and 23 interposed between the yokes II and I2 and rods 2i and 22 interposed between the yokes I2 and I3. Each rod is connected at one end to a corresponding yoke by means of the universally adjustable connecting devices 23, 24, 25, 26, 21, 28, 23, 3), 3i, 32, 33 and 34. The connecting devices 23 to 3I and 33 are identical in construction as may also be the connecting devices 322 and 34, if desired.v

The connecting device 25, for example, may consist of a pair of generally `U -shaped split sleeves 35 and 36 which are the same in construction. As best shown in Figs. 4 and 5, the sleeve 36 has a rounded base portion 36a. and a pair of spaced apart parallel arms 361) and 36e. These arms are separated by a slot 36d which communicates at its inner end with a circular opening 36e in which the rod I8 is received slidably. The sleeve 35 is similar in construction and has an opening 35a receiving the arm of the yoke I5 (Fig. 2). The

two sleeves are connected by means of a socket head screw 31 which serves as a pivot for connecting the two sleeves 35 and 3'5 and also as a clamping means, when tightened, for squeezing the arms of the split sleeves 35 and 36 together to clamp them tightly around the yoke arm and the rod I8, respectively. A corrugated washer 33 or the like may be positioned between the sleeves to 4 prevent relative movement of the two split sleeves 35 and 36, when the screw 31 is tightened.

When the screw 31 is loosened, the split sleeves 35 and 36 may be rocked about the axis of the screw 31 and can slide along the yoke ID and the rod I8, respectively, into any desired position to permit adjustment of the yoke relative tothe rod, to vary the inclination of the yokes relative to each other and to vary the spacing between them.

The connecting devices 32 and 34 preferably are used to adjust the spacing between the yokes II and I2 and are alike. The device 32 (Figs. 1, 2 and 6) includes a split sleeve 39 similar to the sleeve 35 described. The connected split sleeve 40 differs in that it has an enlarged passage or bore 4ta therein for receiving rotatably an internally threaded bushing 4l. The bushing has flanges 4Ia., 4Ib at its opposite ends to prevent endwise movement of the bushing in the sleeve. The flange 4Ia is noncircularv permitting rotation of the sleeve with a wrench. The slot 45h between the arms of the split sleeve 31 is of such width that the arms 40o and 40d or the sleeve can be squeezed tightly together without clamping the bushing 4I against rotation. The. bushing is rotatable even when the connecting screw 42 extending through the sleeves 39 and 45 is tightened sufciently to hold them rigid with respect to each other.

The threaded bushing 4I receives the threaded end section 26a. on the rod 2G so that the spacing between the pair of yokes II) and Ii and the pair of yokes I2 and I3 may be varied by rotating the bushing 4I when all the yokes are rigidly clamped in position. The rod I5 is connected to the yoke I2 by a connecting and adjusting coupling 34, like the coupling 32 described above so that it too may be adjusted to position the several sets of yokes.

The provision of the adjustable couplings 3?. and 34 and the threaded end portions on the rods I9 and 25 renders the apparatus useful for bone-lengthening operations. Thus, with the yokes and wires in position with respect to the bone, and the yokes locked in position, the bone may be severed in the usual way and the bushings 4I then rotated to separate the pairs of yokes Ill and I I further from the pair of yokes I2 and I3. The severed sections of the bone slide relatively endwise without altering their alignment during adjustment of the spacing of the yokes.

Similarly, the apparatus can be used for reducing fractures and as a traction or ambulatory splint.

It will be understood that the apparatus is susceptible to change in its dimensions, the materials from which it is made may be selected according to requirements, and the shape and design of the parts may be altered without departing from the invention. The form of the invention disclosed herein therefore should be considered as illustrative and not as limiting the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. An ambulatory splint and bone lengthening device comprising a iirst pair of U-shaped yokes, a second pair of U-shaped yokes, each of said yokes having a pair of substantially parallel arms connected by an arcuate base, means at the outer end of each arm for gripping a bone-penetrating member, a rst pair of rods connecting the first pair of yokes, a second pair of rods connecting the second pair of yokes, first connecting means joining each end of a rod to a yoke, said first connecting means including a pair of split sleeves normally slidable on the yoke and a rod, and a connecting and clamping screw passing through and joining said split sleeves, a third pair of rods connecting one yoke of the first pair to one yoke of the second pair, each of said third pair of rods having a threaded end portion, second connecting means including split sleeves and a connecting and clamping screw connecting one end of each rod of the third pair to said one yoke of said rst pair, other connecting means between the opposite ends of the third pair of rods and said one yoke of the second pair, each of said connecting means including a rst split sleeve slidable o-n an arm of the last-mentioned yoke, a second split sleeve connected by a clamping screw to said rst split sleeve, said second split sleeve having a bore therethrough, an internally threaded bushing mounted in said bore for rotation and receiving the threaded end of one of said third pair of rods, and means on said second sleeve andV bushing retaining the latter against relative axial movement.

2. An ambulatory splint and bone lengthening device comprising a first pair of U-shaped yokes, a second pair of U-shaped yokes, each of said yokes having a pair of substantially parallel arms connected by an arcuate base, means at Vthe outer end of each arm for gripping a bone-penetrating member, means connecting said yokes of each pair for angular adjustment and to vary spacing between said yokes of each pair, a pair of rods connecting one yoke of the rst pair to one yoke of the second pair, each of said pair of rods having a threaded end portion, first connecting means including split sleeves and a connecting and clamping screw connecting one end of each rod to said one yoke of said iirst pair of yokes, other'connecting means between the opposite end of each of the last-mentioned rods and'said one yoke of the second pair of yokes including a rst split sleeve slidab-le on each arm of the lastmentioned yoke, a second split sleeve connected by a clamping screw to said rlrst split sleeve, said second split sleeve having a bore therethrough, an internally threaded bushing mounted in said bore for rotation and receiving the threaded end of a rod, and means on said second sleeve and bushing retaining the latter against relative axial movement.

3. An ambulatory splint comprising a pair of U-shaped yokes having substantially parallel arms of `circular cross-section, means on each of said yokes to grip and tension a wire, a pair of spacing rods of circular cross-section interposed between the pair of yokes, each of said rods having a threaded portion at one end and an opposite unthreaded end, internally threaded bushings screwed on said threaded portions, a split sleeve mounted for sliding and rotary movement on each arm of said yokes, a split sleeve mounted for sliding and rotary movement on the unthreaded end of each of said spacing rods, another pair of split sleeves receiving said bushings rotatably and screw means connecting said split sleeves on the unthreaded ends of the rods with split sleeves on one of said yokes and the split sleeves receiving the bushings with the split sleeves on the other yoke to connect them for swivelling movement and to lock them against swivelling movement.

4. An ambulatory splint comprising a pair of U-shaped yokes having substantially parallel arms of circular cross-section, means on each of said yokes to grip and tension a wire comprising; clamping plates having a concave surface substantially complementary to a portion of the crosssection of said arms of said yokes, Wires passing between said arms and clamping plates of each said yokes, set screws passing through each of said plates and threaded into said arms to draw said plates and arms together and to thereby exert tension on said wires, a pair of spacing rods of circular cross-section interposed between the pair of yokes, each of said rods having a threaded portion at one end and an opposite unthreaded end, internally threaded bushings screwed on said threaded portions, a split sleeve mounted for sliding and rotary movement on each :arm of `said yokes, a split sleeve mounted for sliding and rotary movement on the unthreaded end of each of said spacing rods, another pair of split sleeves receiving said bushings rotatably and screw means connecting said split sleeves on the unthreaded ends of the rods with split sleeves on one of said yokes and 'the split sleeves receiving the bushings with the split sleeves on the other yoke to connect them for swivelling movement and to lock them against swivelling movement.

5. A yoke for an ambulatory splint comprising a U-shaped yoke having a pair of substantially parallel arms of circular cross-section, clamping plates each having a concave surface substantially complementary to the curvature of said arms of said yoke to receive a. wire between said plates and said arms, screws extending through each of said plates and arms to draw said plates toward said arms and to exert tension on said wire, guide pins on each of said arms engaging in said plates and holding them against relative rotation when said arms and plates are drawn together and notches in the edges of said plates guiding and positioning said Wire and preventing sharp bending of said wire when said plates and arms are drawn together.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS p. 59. (Copy in Div. 55.)

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2056749 *Jan 15, 1932Oct 6, 1936Thomas Albert AFracture appliance
US2198871 *Aug 4, 1936Apr 30, 1940Haboush Edward JFracture reducing and limb lengthening device
US2214490 *Feb 8, 1937Sep 10, 1940Thomas Albert ABone-setting splint
US2406987 *Jan 4, 1943Sep 3, 1946Roger AndersonFracture splint
CH229303A * Title not available
FR723841A * Title not available
FR775126A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3727610 *Feb 17, 1972Apr 17, 1973Riniker PFixator for diaphyses fractures
US3976061 *Jun 11, 1975Aug 24, 1976Mstislav Vasilievich VolkovApparatus for surgical treatment of bones and joints
US3985127 *Jun 11, 1975Oct 12, 1976Mstislav Vasilievich VolkovApparatus for surgical treatment of the knee joint
US3993055 *Jun 11, 1975Nov 23, 1976Mstislav Vasilievich VolkovApparatus for surgical treatment of bone fractures and diseases
US4033340 *Dec 9, 1974Jul 5, 1977Kalnberz Viktor KonstantinovicSurgical compression-distraction instrument
US5653707 *Nov 1, 1994Aug 5, 1997Smith & Nephew Richards, Inc.External skeletal fixation system with improved bar-to-bar connector
US5681309 *Oct 10, 1995Oct 28, 1997Texas Scottish Rite Hospital For Crippled ChildrenDistractor mechanism for external fixation device
US5741252 *Jun 10, 1997Apr 21, 1998Synthes U.S.A.Adjustable clamp for bone fixation element
US5766173 *May 25, 1995Jun 16, 1998Texas Scottish Rite Hospital For ChildrenDistractor mechanism for external fixation device
US5968043 *Feb 10, 1998Oct 19, 1999Texas Scottish Rite Hospital For ChildrenPlastic double nut mechanism enabling rigid orthopedic distraction
US8147524 *Apr 20, 2006Apr 3, 2012Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Instrumentation and methods for reducing spinal deformities
US8992536Jun 24, 2011Mar 31, 2015Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Coplanar deformity correction system
US20120143191 *Dec 17, 2007Jun 7, 2012Brian FooteJoint fixator
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/54
International ClassificationA61H1/02, A61B17/60, A61B17/64
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/6441, A61H1/0218
European ClassificationA61B17/64G, A61H1/02D