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Publication numberUS2687829 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1954
Filing dateDec 2, 1952
Priority dateDec 2, 1952
Publication numberUS 2687829 A, US 2687829A, US-A-2687829, US2687829 A, US2687829A
InventorsHorrocks Walter E
Original AssigneeHorrocks Walter E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container with spout and cap therefor having means on said spout to puncture said cap
US 2687829 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1954 w. E. HORROCKS 2,587,829

. CONTAINER WITH SPOUT AND CAP THEREFOR HAVING MEANS 0N SAID SPOUT T0 PUNCTURE SAID CAP Filed Dec. 2, 1952 bn-rram V M I F borra I6 20' m W /7 k ehd Ella-4. Ems-.5

III IIIIIIIl/l/ 2! nvvszvron mfflw Patented Aug. 31, 1954 CONTAINER WITH SPOUT AND CAP THERE- FOR HAVING MEANS ON SAID PUNCTURE SAID CAP SP OUT TO Walter E. Horrocks, Lakewood, Ohio Application December 2, 1952, Serial No. 323,610

17 Claims.

My present invention relates to containers provided with puncturing means sealed within the container structure and arranged to puncture and bend the bottom of the primary sealing means outwardly.

An important object is to provide the container with auxiliary sealing means.

Another important object is to provide the container with auxiliary sealing means arranged to prevent mixing with the released contents of the container.

Another object is to provide the container with auxiliary seals having compressible characteristics. 1 Another object is to provide the containers with auxiliary seals having distortable character- 15 105.

Another object is to provide the container with a primary sealing cap adapted to confine and support the auxiliary sealing means around its spout.

A still further object is to provide the container with triple seals.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent during the course of the fol lowing description.

In the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification, and in which like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same.

Fig. 1 illustrates a sectional view of a completely assembled container structure embodying the features of the present invention and showing a third seal at X,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional view showing the preferred type of primary sealing cap,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the outlet spout shown in Fig. 1,

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a container structure provided with an extension spout telescoped over the sealing capand showing the bottom of the primary sealing cap after it has been punctured and bent outwardly,

Fig. 5 illustrates a sectional view of an assembly with the container embodying a modified outlet spout supporting the auxiliary seal with the assembly being supported on a tubular funneling element receiving the released contents,

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of the spout employed in Fig. 5 provided with a cork auxiliary seal and,

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view of a spout provided with a rubber auxiliary seal.

In the accompanying drawing which illustrates examples of the invention without de- 2 r fining its limits, Fig. 1 ing structure C provided with an outlet aperture I0 which coincides with the inner side of a tubular spout portion H which is attached to the container structure 0. The tubular spout portion H is preferably cut at an acute angle as shown at [2 and is provided with a puncturing edge preferably as shown at IS. The spout portion II of the container 0 is primary sealed on .the end with a cap portion preferably of the type 1 shown in Fig. 2 in which its tubular wall surrounds the tubular wall of the spout portion ll withthe bottom of the primary sealing cap in close proximity or in contact with the puncturing edge l3 and the outwardly projecting flange [4 providing a means to rest on the top end of a tubular receiving element l5 as shown in Fig. 5. The spout portion H is provided with a groove or recess l6 which provides a reduced tubular section around the spout I I to receive and retain anauxiliary seal ll substantially as shown, and the primary sealing cap portion is initially maintained about the spout I l with a hermetical seal such as sealing wax or its equivalent as indicated at X which is susceptible to be sheared by axial movement of the cap on the spout.

Fig. 2 shows a preferred primary sealing cap provided with a rounded corner 8 at the flanged end providing a means to initially engage the protruding end IQ of the auxiliary seal I! which is shown in Fig. 3 in which the dotted lines D indicate the line of travel such as when the spout portion II is to enter into the primary cap portion shown in Fig. 2 so that the protruding end IQ of the auxiliary seal I1 initially engages the rounded corner l8 and as the primary cap is forced over the spout II the auxiliary seal [7 is compressed between the Wall of the spout portion H and the wall of the primary sealing cap substantially as shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 4 respectively.

Fig. 3 shows the auxiliary seal I! seated in a groove It provided around the spoutportion ll before the primary cap is placed over the spout II in which the tapered sides 20 of the auxiliary seal I! provide a means for initially entering into the primary sealing cap shown in Fig. 2 and then being further compressed, or distorted, as the case may be by the tubular wall of the primary sealing cap against the tubular wall of the spout portion II substantially as shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a container structure C provided with an outlet aperture H) which surrounds a tubular spout portion II which is shows a container holdthe primary sealing cap is arranged to contact t the top side of the containenCEin. such. a man-.

ner to allow of the short side of; the spout por tion II to bend the punctured bottom of the primary sealing cap outwardly and at the same time confine the auxiliary seal l'l between-the tubular wall of the primary sealing cap and. the

tubular wall of the spout II 'in' such a manner that the auxiliary seal I? can not be dislodged and become mixed with the contents discharging from. the container C.

Fig. 5- illustrates a preferred versionof-the invention in a sectional views-howing thereon-.1 tainer structure provided with an outlet aperturelfl'which surrounds a tubular spout portion, I Iv which is attached to the container O and being;

provided with a reduced end 23 and having-its; primarysealing cap positioned onthe end of a tubular receiving. element such as is standard;

automobile equipment for introducing oil into: thecrank case ofautomobile engines inywhich' the bottom of the primary. sealing cap hasbeenpunctured and bent downward. by the reduced; end 23 of the tubular spout I l in which the auxiliaryseal-l-i surrounding the reduced end 23 ofthe tubular spout ii is confined on the ledge 24' of'the. primarysealing cap, which ledge. is --pro;- vided as when the reduced end 23 of the tubular spout punctures an aperture that is substantially smaller in. diameter than the. inside diameter'of.

the tubular walls of the primary sealing cap and;

thereby confining the auxiliary seal on: theledge:

and bent outwardly'as shown substantially in- Fig. 5,

Fig. 6 shows a. fragmentarysectionalview of; the spout ll shown in Fig. 5 before the spout-is. inserted-into the primary cap, with the, auxiliary sealing means, i lsurrounding the reduced tubular wall 2 30f the spout I i and having the outer side 20;.of thesealing means ll tapered. which,al1ows oflthe'rounded cornerlt of the:primary sealing cap shown in Fig. 2 to easily initially engage they small end of the auxiliaryseal lJland then =1ur.-.

ther gradually compress it, or distort it, asthe case may be, around thetubularwall-of the'spout II and against the tubular wall of the primary sealing.- cap substantially 1 as.-- shown in, Fig. 5 such as when the bottom of the-primary'sealing cap has been puncturedby applied axial p res-.

sure on thecontainer to allow ofthecontainers contents to be discharged into the tubular receiv: ing element l5.

Fig. 7 shows a fragmentary-sectional view of a,

tubular spout H such as is shown in Fig. 1,.Fig,

3, andFig. 4 having a recessor-grooyelii provided around the tubular wall providing v are.-

duced wall section for utilizing an auxiliary seal Ila which will allow or the -rubber ring to distort into the recess or groove and press against;- the inner side of the tubular sealing cap walland It' is to be noted 1 against the tubular wall of the spout ll to provide means for holding an auxiliary sealing means substantially as illustrated in Fig. l and Fig. 4 respectively. It is to be noted that the seals I? and Ila can be made of either cork or rubber elements or their equivalents and the spout ll can be provided with both the recess shown in Fig. A and .thezreduced .en'd'shown in Fig. 5, if it is-sodesired,

It is to be further noted that in addition to holding substances within the container with the primary sealing .cap-the auxiliary sealing means incorporated described herein provides an additional sealingzmeans to prevent the seepage of penetrating substances for which the primary sealing cap may be inadequate, and the hermeticallysealing means-disclosed herewith at X in Fig. 1 provides a means to triple seal the container against allowin of the seepage of penetrating contents from the container and also to maintain, the :primarysealing cap in a temporary fi-xed position on thewspout ll until such a time thatthe seals *areto :be broken to allow of the.

contents with-in thezcontainer to be discharged therefrom. When axial pressure is applied on the bottom :of the container structure, or on the end. of the extendedyspout as the case may be, the puncturing meansjprovided on the spout II will puncture an aperture through the bottom of he r mary, sealingcapand also at the same time break the hermetical seal around the spout II as, shownat-X'inFig'. 1, which thereby with one operation al-lowszof; the triple sealing means to.

instantly release the contents within the contai-ner-tofiowoutwardly through the spout II or 2l-as1thecase may? be,'or .fiow into the tubular receiving element l5 as is shown in the assem.

blage imFig'. 5, and,which.receiving element I5 is applicablefor use with either of the Figures 1, 4, and 5.

It is to be understood that the form of my invention, herein shownand described, is to be taken as preferred examples ofthe same, and that various, changesirr the r shape, size and arrangement of=parts may be resorted to, without departin from the spirit of myinvention, or the. scope. of the subjoinedclaims, and I reserve the;rightito.the use of various elements, or combinationv or? elements, for: constructing the containers and seals without departing from the scope on the appended claims.

Thisapplication. is. an improvement over the subject matter-disclosed in my copendin application Serial No. 198,661, filed, December 1, 1950 for Container, as the present container may be used in. the samemanner as is described therein with. theadditionalauxiliary sealing means described in this application being incorporated in order to provide'a more effective sealed container, and also. to disclose-that the flanged end of the D marysea1ing cap may be hermetically sealed around; the tubular spout H and the primary sealing cap as is indicatedat X in Fig. 1. It is alsodntended. that the containers areto be used .without the-third seal if it is so desired.

with, puncturing means onthe end of the spout, v

5 a primary sealin means providing a cap fitted around the spout above and below the puncturing means, and an auxiliary sealing element arranged around the reduced tubular section of the said spout between the walls of said cap and said spout.

2. A container as described in claim 1 including a third sealing means around the said spout initially holding the primary sealing means to the said spout.

3. A container of the character described comprising a container structure having outlet means, a tubular outlet spout attached to the container about the outlet means, puncturing means on the end of the spout, a primary sealing means providing a cap fitted around the spout above and below the puncturing means, a groove provided around the spout, and an. auxiliary sealing means the spout above and below the puncturing means,

a portion of the wall of the said spout having a reduced tubular wall section therearound, and

an auxiliary seal arranged around the reduced tubular wall section of the said spout between the wall of said cap and said spout.

6. A container as described in claim including a third sealing means around the said spout initially holding the primary sealing means to the said spout.

'7. The assemblage as described in claim 1 including a tubular receivin element arranged to support the said assemblage and funnel the contents from the said container.

8. The assemblage as described in claim 5 ineluding a tubular receiving element arranged to support the said assemblage and funnel the contents from the said container.

9. A container comprising a holding structure having outlet means, a tubular outlet spout attached to the said structure about the outlet means, puncturing means on the end of the said spout, said spout further provided with a reduced tubular section therearound, a slideable primary sealing cap having a cylindrical wall, a bottom, and an outwardly projecting flange including a rounded shoulder mergin the said flange with the said wall, fitted on the said spout around and over the puncturing means, and an auxiliary seal arranged around the reduced tubular section of the said spout between the said section of the said spout and the said wall of said cap.

10. A container as described in claim 9 including a third sealing means arranged around the said spout initially holding the primary sealing means to the said spout.

11. The assemblage as described in claim 9 including a tubular receiving element arranged to support the said assemblage and funnel the contents from the said container.

12. A container of the character described comprising a container structure having outlet means, a tubular outlet spout coinciding with the outlet means and attached to the said container including a reduced tubular section extending to the bottom of the said spout, puncturing means on the end of the said spout, a primary sealing means providing a slideable cap fitted around the said spout above and below the said puncturing means, and an auxiliary sealing means arranged between the wall of the said reduced tubular section and the wall of the primary sealing means.

13. A container as described in claim 12 including a third sealing means around the said spout initially holding the primary sealing means to the said spout.

14. The assemblage as described in claim 12 including a tubular receiving element arranged to support the said assemblage and funnel the contents from the said container.

15. In a container of the character described having a tubular puncturing outlet spout including a reduced tubular section therearound, and a primary sealing cap covering the end of the outlet spout with an auxiliary sealing means arranged around the said reduced section of the spout and a hermetical sealing means arranged around the said spout initially sealing the said cap to the said spout in such a manner that all of said seals may be broken simultaneously when axial pressure is applied to the bottoms of said containers, substantially as described.

16. A container of the character described comprising a container structure having outlet means, a tubular outlet spout attached to the container about the outlet means, said spout provided with a reduced tubular section extending to the bottom end of the spout, puncturing means on the end of the reduced section, and a slideable sealing means providing a cap fitted around the spout above the reduced section and extending around and across the puncturing means of the reduced section.

17. In a container of the character described, as a subcombination, an outlet spout providing a solid tubular wall free from serrated ends with the top end of the spout having a free open end adapted to coincide with the perimeter of an outlet aperture, and the opposite pouring end of the said spout providing a reduced tubular wall section including puncturing means arranged about the pouring end of said spout.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 978,488 Roesch Dec. 13, 1910 1,606,527 Hanes et al. 1 Nov'. 9, 1926 2,063,525 Shickel Dec. 8, 1936 2,071,815 Chamberlain Feb. 23, 1937 2,084,529 Landan June 22, 1937 2,094,869 Ballard Oct. 5, 193'? 2,236,960 Salmund et al Apr. 1, 1941 2,249,832 Hubschman July 22, 1941 2,258,636 Young et a1 Oct. 14, 1941 2,582,112 Ferguson Jan. 8, 1952 2,601,039 Livingstone June 1'7, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 201,794 Switzerland Mar. 1, 1939

Patent Citations
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US2063525 *Mar 29, 1934Dec 8, 1936Schickel William PReceptacle
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US2249832 *May 7, 1937Jul 22, 1941Jacob HubschmanDispensing device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2849156 *Apr 11, 1955Aug 26, 1958Jorgen Mansted Svend AxelDispensing device
US3186599 *Oct 15, 1963Jun 1, 1965Evelyn S LevinsonDispenser for liquid in upright container with controlled atmosphere
US4289255 *Oct 18, 1979Sep 15, 1981Strampe Clarence WOil filter cap
US4673537 *Jun 4, 1986Jun 16, 1987Goettl Adam DTrap for the sump drain of an evaporative cooler
US5280764 *May 26, 1992Jan 25, 1994Levinrad Maxim DDispenser accessory to facilitate loading bottles in a dispenser
US5316058 *Sep 15, 1992May 31, 1994Semyon SpektorContainer having a self-opening pouring spout
US6364180 *Nov 29, 2000Apr 2, 2002Alberto C. CardenasContainer for dispensing oil into an engine
US6915918Jul 7, 2003Jul 12, 2005Richard MerrillRemovable sealing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/83, 141/329, 141/330
International ClassificationB65D47/00, B65D47/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/36
European ClassificationB65D47/36